Undergraduate

Physics

Astrophysics student poses in the laboratory next to a telescope
Physics equipment
Physics student using lab equipment
Two students examine the contents of a test tube in a laboratory

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You’ll gain a deep understanding of modern physics and develop valuable skills in data science, programming, problem solving, communication and teamwork.
Physics degrees are highly valued by employers. Our graduates go on to careers in a diverse range of fields from medical physics to R&D to laser systems engineering and more.
Take advantage of a range of extra-curricular events to boost your CV and your network, including careers fairs with opportunities to meet future employers.
Build investigative skills and carry out research tackling as yet unanswered questions.
You’ll be taught by our world-leading academics, learning within our physics lab on this IOP-accredited degree.
Astrophysics student poses in the laboratory next to a telescope
Physics equipment
Physics student using lab equipment
Two students examine the contents of a test tube in a laboratory
Physics Teaching Laboratory

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Physics. It’s how the world works: from the nanoscale to the cosmological.

Here, you can help us chip away at the boundaries of knowledge.

You'll conduct research in areas like advanced materials, lasers and space – tackling as yet unanswered questions. Gain a thorough understanding of fundamental physics and maths concepts. And develop investigative skills to apply these concepts in new areas of science, technology and enterprise.

Highly valued by employers, a Physics degree leads to varied and rewarding careers from research and development to accountancy and management.

  • 10th in the UK overall 1

  • Top 5 in the UK

    for Student Satisfaction 2

  • Institute of Physics

    accredited

  • Home to Viper

    One of the most powerful supercomputers in England

  • Diverse

    student population

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Course overview
Module options

About this course

Discover the concepts and tools to understand modern physics at a deep level on this accredited course.

Advances in new energy sources, modern medical techniques, communications and computers... they’ve all come from physicists with the knowledge to innovate and the skills to deliver.

We’ll help you develop the transferable data science skills that employers value – including in Python, one of the fastest-growing programming languages. You'll pick up sought-after skills in everything from communication and team work to problem solving, alongside programming, maths and research experience.

Nurtured by world-leading academics, you’ll have weekly tutorials in your first two years. And one-to-one feedback sessions with your tutor throughout your degree.

We run a packed calendar of over 100 events every year, spanning widening participation, diversity and curriculum-enhancing activities. We’re part of a unique employability network, the White Rose Industrial Physics Alliance, which runs careers events featuring potential future employers. And our award-winning Changing Face of Physics Campaign means that Physics at Hull has one of the most diverse student populations in the country.

Scheduled study hours and how you’re assessed

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

How you'll be assessed depends on the course you study, and the modules you choose. You may be assessed through a mix of examinations, coursework, presentations and group projects.

Choose your modules

Each year, you’ll study modules worth a certain number of credits, and you need 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits – so you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more. In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120. Some modules are compulsory, some are optional, so you can build a course that’s right for you.

Foundation Mathematics A

You will study pure mathematics topics, including proof, algebra, trigonometry, differentiation, integration, exponentials, logarithms, sequences and series. The applied topic is probability and statistics.

Core20 credits

Introduction to Physics 1

This is the first of two foundation year modules that prepare you for studying physics or mathematics at degree level. You will study the basics of mechanics, properties of matter, electricity and magnetism.

Core20 credits

Preparing for Learning in Higher Education

This module is designed to give you the best possible start to your university studies, making sure you have all the essential skills you need to succeed. Through lectures and workshops we will teach you how to write in an academic style, how to find quality sources, how to reference work, culminating in writing up a mini-research project.

Core20 credits

Foundation Mathematics B

This module extends the knowledge gained in the Foundation Mathematics A - pure mathematics topics. You will also study functions and vectors. The applied topic is mechanics.

Core20 credits

Introduction to Physics 2

This is the second of two foundation year modules that prepare you for studying physics or mathematics at degree level. You will study the basics of oscillations, waves, and quantum and nuclear physics.

Core20 credits

Group Challenge (Sciences)

In a group, you'll formulate questions that can be tested by scientific investigations and take part in weekly workshops with academics.

Compulsory20 credits

This is for students who do not have suitable qualifications in physics and maths for direct entry to the BSc degree. 

6 Modules

Introduction to Experimental Skills and Mathematics for Physics

This module introduces the scientific instruments and experimental skills that you'll need to study physics. You'll develop your maths abilities so that you can solve physics problems.

Core20 credits

Experimental Physics and Mathematics 1

This module further develops your practical and maths skills. You'll explore aspects of practical physics through experiments in teams.

Core20 credits

The Classical World

This module delivers essential physics covering two main themes: classical mechanics and optics. You'll study Newton's Laws and extend them to simple fluid dynamics.

Compulsory20 credits

Gravitation and Astronomy

On this module you'll study Kepler's Laws; observational astronomy and telescopes; stellar and galaxy evolution; and introductory cosmology.

Compulsory20 credits

Electricity and Magnetism with Computation

Discover electrostatics and magnetostatics and how to apply your knowledge of them. You'll also learn the essentials of Python, which is one of the most popular programming languages.

Compulsory20 credits

From the Quantum World to the Macro World – an Introduction to Quantum Physics and the Properties of Matter

Explore how quantum physics can explain the behaviour of atoms – and how that behaviour can in turn explain the macroscopic properties of the matter around us.

Compulsory20 credits
6 Modules

Experimental Physics and Mathematics 2

In lab classes, you'll develop your technique by creating experiments to solve specific problems. And in mathematics, you'll learn about differential equations and Fourier series. 

Core20 credits

Experimental Physics and Mathematics 3

Develop your own scientific investigations and do scientific research by designing experiments to answer a question that you set. You'll also learn about vector calculus.

Core20 credits

Thermodynamics, Statistical Physics and Special Relativity

This module analyses the equilibrium behaviour of many-body systems from a macroscopic point of view (thermodynamics) and from a microscopic point of view (statistical physics). 

Compulsory20 credits

Intermediate Quantum Mechanics with Advanced Computation

This course continues your exploration of quantum-based concepts. You'll use Schrödinger’s equation and its solutions in different situations and examine angular momentum and spin. 

Compulsory20 credits

The Physics of Waves and Solid State

Study the essentials of wave phenomena leading up to electromagnetic waves and Maxwell's equations. You'll also learn about the electronic properties of solids.

Compulsory20 credits

Physics by Inquiry: Concepts and Relations

During this module, you'll use physics to solve real-life problems from a wide range of topics. There's also a lecture series on famous current and historical areas of physics.

Compulsory20 credits

The laboratory is central to your studies where you learn to design experiments and develop practical skills. A global challenge module provides opportunity to tackle real world problems in an interdisciplinary team. Transfer between most physics courses - including the MPhys and BSc courses - is possible up to the end of the second year.

6 Modules

BSc Project

Plan, research, conduct and report a scientific investigation, either individually or in a group. This might include programming, data acquisition and analysis, and a study of related literature. 

Core20 credits

Advanced Quantum and Plasma Physics

What are the key theories and experiments of nuclear and particle physics? How can we apply quantum mechanics to solve problems in nuclear and particle physics? What is a Hilbert space?

Compulsory20 credits

Numerical Modelling and Simulation with Research Project Planning

In this module, you further develop your Python programming skills. You’ll learn about numerical techniques to solve complex problems in physics and astrophysics. In parallel, you will prepare your final year project guided by your supervisor.

Compulsory20 credits

Matter at Extremes

Discover basic concepts of magnetism and superconductivity and outline their role in key applications. You’ll also learn to describe and define the main characteristics of a plasma.

Compulsory20 credits

Physics of Semiconductor Devices

Gain insight and understanding of the basic physics that underpins several distinct areas in physics-based technologies in optics and electronics. 

Compulsory20 credits

Galactic and Extra-Galactic Astronomy

Develop your understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies as well as basic cosmology.

Compulsory20 credits

You take advanced theoretical, practical and technological topics spanning the wide range of modern physics.

6 Modules

Group Problem Solving

You'll work in groups to solve both experimental and theoretical problems - applying new concepts to unfamiliar situations to develop your research and modelling skills.

Compulsory20 credits

Advanced Quantum and Plasma Physics

What are the key theories and experiments of nuclear and particle physics? How can we apply quantum mechanics to solve problems in nuclear and particle physics? What is a Hilbert space?

Compulsory20 credits

Matter at Extremes

Discover basic concepts of magnetism and superconductivity and outline their role in key applications. You’ll also learn to describe and define the main characteristics of a plasma.

Compulsory20 credits

Experimental Research Skills and Research Project Planning

Develop your ability and confidence in experimental methods and identify the usefulness and limitations of specialist measurement and experimental technology. You'll gain the skills to access and analyse information independently in preparation for undertaking your final stage project.

Compulsory20 credits

Numerical Modelling and Simulation with Research Project Planning

In this module, you further develop your Python programming skills. You’ll learn about numerical techniques to solve complex problems in physics and astrophysics. In parallel, you will prepare your final year project guided by your supervisor.

Compulsory20 credits

Physics of Semiconductor Devices

Gain insight and understanding of the basic physics that underpins several distinct areas in physics-based technologies in optics and electronics. 

Compulsory20 credits
6 Modules

MPhys Project

Plan, research, execute and report a scientific investigation. You'll be assigned either an individual experiment or theoretical project. 

Core40 credits

Self-Assembly and Nanoelectronics

How physics is applied on the nanoscale to achieve functionality in materials and devices including in nanoelectronics and self-assembled structured fluids.

Core20 credits

General Relativity and Further Quantum Mechanics

The physics of the very large and the very small. You’ll learn Einstein’s theory of general relativity and explore topics in quantum mechanics.

Core20 credits

Nanofabrication and Nanophotonics

Here we cover developments in nanophotonic materials and devices, including advanced techniques in the nanofabrication and characterization of devices.

Optional20 credits

Topics in Data Science

Cover a selection of topics in data science, which lies at the interface of applied mathematics, probability and statistics, physics and computer science.

Optional20 credits

Capstone Research Topics in Astronomy

​This module will deliver cutting-edge research topics across astronomy and astrophysics. You'll also be trained in the use of modern astrophysics databases.

Optional20 credits

You carry out a major research project, usually related to your option choice. This involves working with a research group in the department, under the guidance of internationally-renowned researchers, enabling you to develop expertise in topics at the frontier of research.

Examples of project titles include: Charge Transport of Novel Perovskite Solar Cells, Quantum Langton’s Ant, Plasmonic Crystals, and Chaotic Modelling in Memristor Circuits.

6 Modules

This course is accredited by

Playlist

Dr Gareth Few

Course Overview 2 mins

Leah Cox

Student story 1 min

Justice & Fairness

Research Highlight 1 min

Isobel Judson

Student story 1 min

Entry requirements

What do I need?

We consider experience and qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations above.

But it's not just about the grades - we'll look at your whole application. We want to know what makes you tick, and about your previous experience, so make sure that you complete your personal statement.

Have questions? Our admissions team will be happy to help.

What do I need?

If you require a student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

See other English language proficiency qualifications accepted by the University of Hull.

If your English currently does not reach the University’s required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees & funding

How much is it?

Additional costs you may have to pay

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme. There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make:

  • Books (you can borrow books on your reading lists from the library, but you may buy your own)
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (incl. travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (incl. travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel, food and more.

How do I pay for it?

How much is it?

Additional costs you may have to pay

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme. There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make:

  • Books (you can borrow books on your reading lists from the library, but you may buy your own)
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (incl. travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (incl. travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel, food and more.

How do I pay for it?

Take a look at our facilities

Supercomputing

You’ll have access to Viper – the highest-spec computer at any university in the North of England.

Physics Laboratory

Gain the tools you need for a broad understanding of modern physics in our physics lab.

Brynmor Jones Library

Our seven-storey library is a superb learning space. As well as over a million books, there’s a variety of study areas, and one amazing view.

Open-access PCs

You’ll find over 400 open-access PCs in our library, as well as over 70 laptops to borrow. There’s also learning rooms with big-screen PCs and private study rooms - plus interactive projector tables.

See more in our virtual tour
viper-supercomputer

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Look around

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viper-supercomputer
Physics Teaching Laboratory
Brynmor Jones Library Observation Deck
Brynmor Jones Library Reading Room
leah cox, astrophysics student, in lab with telescope

Future prospects

You could go on employment within a diverse range of fields such as research and development, ICT systems analysis, education, data science, laser systems engineering, medical physics, pharmaceuticals, nuclear engineering, scientific media, and finance.

Our graduates have secured roles at companies including Rolls-Royce, Thales, QinetiQ, NPL, Reckitt and Clyde Bergemann. Others have gone onto graduate training schemes with the National Grid and the NHS.

This degree meets the educational requirements towards a sought-after qualification as a Chartered Physicist, which opens even more doors to future employment and research opportunities – such as staying on an extra year to gain a Masters.

University of Hull Open Day

Your next steps

Not ready to apply?

Visit our next Open Day, and see all that Hull has to offer for yourself. Talk to our lecturers about your subject, find out what university is really like from our current students, and take a tour of our beautiful campus and amazing facilities.

  1. Physics at Hull is ranked 10th overall, Guardian League Table 2023.
  2. Physics at Hull is ranked 5th in the UK for overall student satisfaction. National Student Survey (NSS) 2022, HEIs only.

 

All modules presented on this course page are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

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