Undergraduate

BSc Geography

Explore the complex natural and human processes shaping the world - and visit places such as Almeria, Tenerife and Iceland.

Key information

Study mode

Full-time

Course length

3 years

Typical offer

120 points

A Level grades: BBB

UCAS code

F800

Choose an option

Start date

Course overview

BSc Geography focuses on the physical processes that govern the state of the natural environment. Practical work is at the heart of this degree. You'll gain extensive hands-on training in analytical techniques in the laboratory and in the field, as well as studying the theory of environmental variability.

We prioritise learning outside the classroom with core field trips – think locations such as Almeria and Tenerife. 

The cost of all our core field trips during your first and second years is included in your fees. During your final year, there are further optional trips to international destinations, such as Iceland.

Six reasons to study Geography at Hull

  1. Cost of core field trips included in your fees
  2. Ranked third in the UK for research impact#
  3. 92% graduate employability rating
  4. Accredited by the Royal Geographical Society
  5. 93% rating for overall student satisfaction
  6. Develop career-ready skills such as GIS

What you'll study

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

First year modules

Our BA and BSc programmes share a core first year, providing a thorough grounding in human and physical geography before specialising in your chosen pathways.

Fieldwork is integral to our programme and all core field trips, including our second year overseas trips, are provided free of charge. Hull is well placed to explore the geographical diversity of its region with areas from the North Sea Coast to the North York Moors all within easy reach. 

  • Compulsory

    Planet Earth

    A look at the planet we live on and its constituent systems and processes: oceans, atmosphere, biosphere and tectonics.

    Worlds of Connection and Difference

    This module will introduce you to key perspectives in contemporary human geography. It uses the themes of difference and connection to explore a wide range of case studies. 

    Exploring Worlds Around Us

    You’ll find out about many different ways of studying the world around us by exploring a specific field trip location.

    Landscapes of the World

    This module introduces you to different landforms and landscapes found across the globe: from mountains and glaciers to rainforests, coastal and marine environments and deserts.

    Interpreting Environments

    This module introduces you to some key tools we use to interpret the environments around us, such as computer mapping and data analysis. 

    Development and Change

    Our changing world faces many challenges, especially in developing countries. Learn how geographers approach development, inequality, sustainability and governance.

Second year modules

The second and final years of our BSc Geography programme allow you to specialise in physical geography while continuing to take some human geography modules.

You will choose modules from six academic pathways: hazards, Earth surface dynamics, environmental change, sustainability and development, cities and globalisation, and people, culture and place.

  • Core

    Frontiers in Physical Geography

    This module gives you the tools needed to be a physical geographer and make an original contribution to our knowledge of the world.

  • Compulsory

    Field Studies (Physical Geography)

    Visit field locations including Tenerife and Almeria, as well as UK destinations, where you'll design and conduct your own research projects. 

  • Choose one

    Living in the Anthropocene

    You'll consider profound questions about the scale of the impact of human activities on our planet and the prospects for sustainable global environmental stewardship. 

    Green Planet

    Discover the fascinating world of photosynthetic organisms, from single celled marine algae to the giant trees of the tropical rain forests. Practical classes will teach you ways of investigating plants and algae in the lab and in the field.

  • Optional

    Environmental Change

    Investigate how the environment, especially the climate, changes in the past, present and future through a combination of lectures and practical activities. 

    Geohazards

    Explore what constitutes a geohazard, and the specifics of a range of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, flooding, and climate-related hazards.​

    Geomorphology

    Look at Earth surface processes from the source in upland areas to the sink in coastal environments. You'll learn about sediments are eroded, transported and deposited.

    Cities and Globalisation

    Using real examples of cities from around the world, you'll examine urban development patterns and processes in an era of rapid globalisation. 

    Cultural and Historical Geography

    You'll be using sources as diverse as films, music, art, landscape and maps to learn about the cultural, historical and social processes that make our world. 

    Sustainable Futures

    Study key issues relating to the concept of sustainability and attempts to create more sustainable ways of living. 

    Geographical Information Systems

    Develop your understanding of the principles and processes behind GIS, the nature and use of spatial data and the application of GIS on this practical module.

Year abroad modules

You will spend year 3 studying abroad at a university of your choice. During this year, you will follow a programme of study agreed between yourself and the department prior to your departure. You will take all assessments set by the host university while you are overseas, for which marks will be awarded and a final transcript released.

Final year modules

The final year of our BSc Geography programme allows you to specialise further in the areas of geography that you are most interested in.

You will have the chance to spend one semester gaining real-world experience working on a project with an outside organisation from the private, public or non-profit sectors.

  • Core

    Dissertation

    You will make an original contribution to research by designing, carrying out and writing up your own project on a topic you choose, supported by your dissertation supervisor.

  • Optional

    Conservation in a Changing World

    Managing and protecting the natural environment is difficult enough, but we currently face rapid and dramatic change in climate, environment and socio-economic structures. Explore the challenges of planning effectively for conservation in a changing world.

    Volcanoes and their Hazards

    Explore the key themes and current research-led understanding of volcanological processes and hazards, volcanic monitoring and management of volcanic crises around the world.

    Palaeoenvironments

    ​This module will take you on a journey through the current Ice Age, which spans the last 2.6 million years. 

    Adapting to Climate Change

    Investigate climate change, its impact on us and our adaptions to it, as well as future climate change scenarios. This module uses a combination of lectures, PC practicals and seminars.

    Rivers and their Management

    A practical look at how we manage rivers, both in terms of the water they carry and their influence of a changing landscape.

    Cities and Regions

    This module introduces you to key concepts and policies related to urbanisation and regional development, focusing on selected examples from North America. 

    Feeding the City

    Explore the production and consumption networks that feed the city, following food from field to fork. Consider the complex systems of farming, food processing, retail and consumption that feed us.

    Green Economy

    Explore different theories, strategies and actions to green our economy and society in response to pressing issues such as climate change, resource scarcity and social inequalities. 

    Geographies of Oppression and Resistance

    You'll cover topics such as neoliberalism and the ‘War on Terror’, totalitarianism, institutions of oppression, the civil rights movement, suffrage campaigns and climate change protests.

    Professional Consultancy Project

    Work with an external host organisation on a research project designed to be useful to them, while being supervised by university tutors. 

    Teaching Project

    This module provides you with real world teaching experience and allows you to conduct a project with a school into an aspect of teaching and learning in your subject. 

    Geotechnologies A: Advanced GIS

    Develop your geospatial analysis and modelling skills with GIS. This will provide you with key expertise when you enter the geographic job market.

    Advanced Field Study

    You’ll research first-hand the challenges of harnessing human and physical resources in a developing country to meet the needs for sustainable development.

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

How you'll study

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Overall workload

264 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

936 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

25%
75%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

180 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

816 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

204 hours

Placement Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Indicative assessment proportions

14%
9%
77%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

1,200 hours

Placement Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Indicative assessment proportions

100%
  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

324 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

876 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

4%
96%
  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Rhianna Phillips Geography

"It felt like home. Everyone was so friendly and helpful, Hull was somewhere I needed to study."

Entry requirements

Don't meet our requirements?

We offer a Foundation Year to boost your skills and knowledge – it’s a great way to make your way into higher education.

Switch to the foundation year

Points can be from any qualifications on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications 

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 30 points.
  • Access to HE Diploma: Pass with 23 credits at merit.

Worried you don’t quite meet our entry requirements?

We consider experience and qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations above.

But it’s not just about the grades – we’ll look at your whole application. We want to know what makes you tick, and about your previous experience, so make sure that you complete your personal statement.

If you have any questions, our admissions team will be happy to help.

Don't meet our requirements?

We offer a Foundation Year to boost your skills and knowledge – it’s a great way to make your way into higher education.

Switch to the foundation year

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. See other English language proficiency qualifications accepted by this University.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

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Take a tour of the facilities

Use facilities such as the flume - a device for studying the bodies of water that dominate our planet.

Fees and funding

Home / EU

£9,250 per year*

International

£17,200 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £9,203 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Scholarships

If you achieve

112 UCAS tariff points or above

from 3 A levels or equivalent, you could receive

£1,200 to £2,000

Find out more

An affordable city for students

From bills, to meals, to pints – you’ll find that your money goes a lot further in Hull.

Your future prospects

  • Environmental consultant
  • Town planner
  • Conservation officer
  • Teacher
  • Hydrographer

Studying geography will give you a range of transferable skills in research, data analysis and communication.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for a diverse range of employers, including the British Army, Middlesbrough FC, KPMG, Yorkshire Wildlife Trust, Associated British Ports and Green Energy.

Open Day at University of Hull

Ready to apply?

You can apply for this course through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

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This. Is. Hull.

A place where we stand up to kings, do deals with the world and take a wrecking ball to the slave trade. A place where culture stands out and the phone boxes are a different colour. A place where we're free-thinking, independent and proud of it.

#For the geography subject area in the Research Excellence Framework, 2014.

†Percentage of students in work or further study within six months of graduating: UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey for the academic year 2016/17, published by HESA 2018

‡Overall satisfaction score for this subject (National Student Survey 2019, HEIs)