Skip to main content
Dr David Milan

Dr David Milan

Reader in River Science

Faculty and Department

  • Faculty of Science and Engineering
  • School of Environmental Sciences

Summary

David Milan is a fluvial geomorphologist, and obtained his PhD in 2001 from the Department of Geography, University of Newcastle. Whilst writing up his PhD he worked as an Associate Lecturer in Fluvial and Glacial Geomorphology at the University of Northumbria, and in 2001 obtained a Lectureship in Physical Geography and Environmental Science at the University of Gloucestershire. In 2012 he moved to the Department of Geography, Geology and Environment at the University of Hull, where he is currently Reader in River Science. David recently completed an Institute of Advanced Study Fellowship (2020-21) at Collegium de Lyon, University of Lyon, France.

Dr Milan’s research lies at the interface between fluvial geomorphology and freshwater ecology, and focuses upon monitoring and modelling fluvial dynamics, with special emphasis on sediment transport and associated geomorphic processes in gravel bed and dryland river systems. His research has utilised remote-sensing and has applied LiDAR to assess river bed grain-size, high resolution topographic change, and river habitat. Dr Milan is also involved with applied research into geomorphologically-based Natural Flood Management, assessing impacts of climate change on fluvial systems, and monitoring the impacts of large dams on fluvial processes and fish habitat.

Recent outputs

View more outputs

Book

A Field Guide to British Rivers

Heritage, G., Large, A., & Milan, D. (in press). A Field Guide to British Rivers. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons

Journal Article

Correlating floodplain geochemical profiles with archival historical mining records to establish depositional chronologies of river sediment

Parker, A., Milan, D. J., & McEwen, L. (2022). Correlating floodplain geochemical profiles with archival historical mining records to establish depositional chronologies of river sediment. CATENA, 218, Article 106532. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.catena.2022.106532

Modelling differential geomorphic effectiveness in neighbouring upland catchments: implications for sediment and flood risk management in a wetter world

Milan, D. J. (2021). Modelling differential geomorphic effectiveness in neighbouring upland catchments: implications for sediment and flood risk management in a wetter world. Progress in physical geography, https://doi.org/10.1177/03091333211045514

Climate-change driven increased flood magnitudes and frequency in the British uplands: geomorphologically informed scientific underpinning for upland flood-risk management

Milan, D. J., & Schwendel, A. C. (2021). Climate-change driven increased flood magnitudes and frequency in the British uplands: geomorphologically informed scientific underpinning for upland flood-risk management. Earth surface processes and landforms : the journal of the British Geomorphological Research Group, https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.5206

Presentation / Conference

Geomorphological numerical modelling of woody dams in CAESAR-Lisflood

Wolstenholme, J., Skinner, C., Milan, D., & Parsons, D. (2021, April). Geomorphological numerical modelling of woody dams in CAESAR-Lisflood. Poster presented at EGU General Assembly 2021 (European Geosciences Union), vEGU21: Gather Online

Project

Funder

Grant

Started

Status

Project

Understanding floods from catchment to coast

Funder

NERC Natural Environment Research Council

Grant

£2,000.00

Started

1 January 2017

Status

Complete

Project

Remote sensing soil processes and health for improved Carbon sequestration

Funder

British Academy

Grant

£9,434.00

Started

1 December 2021

Status

Complete

Postgraduate supervision

David welcomes applications for PhD research in:

- natural flood management

- geomorphic change detection using LiDAR

- geospatial analyses of river channel morphology and roughness

- sediment transport processes in gravel-bed rivers

-large wood in rivers

- siltation of salmonid spawning areas

- monitoring and modelling sediment pathways in river systems

Completed PhDs:

Shona Thomson - "Landscape evolution modelling of dryland rivers"

Jason Stopps - ("Sediment sources and delivery to ecological sensitive instream sites, River Lugg, Herefordshire, UK"

Andrew Parker "Sediment sourcing in a catchment heaviliy influenced by histric metal mining: a case study from the South Tyne, UK"

Current PhD supervisions:

Josh Wolstenholme - "Influence of Natural Flood Management (NFM) on fluvial geomorphologic evolution"

Serena Teasdale- "Sticky Coasts: Characterising the role of biological cohesion in modulating erosion in coastal fringe environments"

Awards and prizes

Fellow of the Higher Education Academy

2003

Committee/Steering group role

International Scientific Committee for the 4th international conference on integrative sciences and sustainable development of large rivers

2020 - 2021

BSG Chair of Outreach sub committee

2012 - 2015

Journal editorial role

Editorial Board Member “Water"

2022 - 2024

Editorial Board Member "Remote Sensing"

2019

Top