television

Richard Hoggart Centre for Comparative Cultural Studies

All of our work is directed towards social justice and is immersed in the questions and challenges that make a difference to people’s lives.

Dr Rachel Haworth
Faculty of Arts, Cultures and Education
Dr Rachel Haworth
Director

The Challenge

The Hoggart Centre is inspired by the work of Richard Hoggart (1918-2014) who wrote his major work, The Uses of Literacy (1957), during his time at the University of Hull where he was a staff tutor from 1946 to 1959.

Hoggart broke down the boundaries between 'high' and 'low' art to encourage an interdisciplinary approach to a multitude of cultural forms and practices that had been previously ignored by academics.

He regarded culture as intrinsically related to the social and political domains. As such he saw culture as a form of power, capable of both undermining and supporting marginalised communities.

Hoggart's critical vision of culture, and the discipline of cultural studies that he gave to us, was always intended as a means to achieving social justice. Our research is united by these guiding principles.

The Approach

Our research work brings together academic experts from across multiple disciplines.

It ranges from teaching English to migrant communities, to establishing reading groups with prison inmates to encourage rehabilitation.

We use cultural texts to raise awareness about digital privacy and security, and aim to build new pedagogies in language learning.

Bookshelf

OUR AIMS

  • to continue Hoggart’s legacy of regarding culture as socially and politically embedded
  • to adopt Hoggart’s emphasis upon social justice and his concern for marginalised communities

Projects

Transnational Detectives

Watching the Transnational Detectives: Showcasing Identity, Internationalism and Language Learning on British Television

Crime dramas such as The Tunnel, Babylon Berlin and Inspector Montalbano draw large numbers of British television viewers and are part of a boom in foreign language programmes that are now available to audiences through a variety of platforms and services.

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Watching the Transnational Detectives: Showcasing Identity, Internationalism and Language Learning on British Television

Crime dramas such as The Tunnel, Babylon Berlin and Inspector Montalbano draw large numbers of British television viewers and are part of a boom in foreign language programmes that are now available to audiences through a variety of platforms and services.

But while viewing our favourite crime shows, what else are we discovering about the country we are seeing and the people we are hearing on screen?

Does our viewing influence our attitudes about languages and encourage us to embark on learning a new language? This project examines the ways in which viewers respond to languages and multiculturalism as showcased in a range of well-loved crime dramas from France, Italy and Germany.

It explores the impact these series have on audience’s perceptions of nationhood, foreign languages and cultures, and language learning. Ultimately, it aims to establish the extent to which these programmes successfully encourage multilingualism in 21st century Britain.

This research project is sponsored by the AHRC-OWRI MEITS research initiative.

Find out more.

The full rich life and the abuses of literacy: why we need to keep reading Richard Hoggart

Annual Lecture

Richard Hoggart published his most famous book in 1957, yet his writing remains relevant today. Why should we still read him?

Speaker: Lynsey Hanley

Wednesday 20 March 2019, 5.30pm

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Hoggart ‘Viewing’ Group

Led by Lee Rawlings

Wednesday 6 March 2019, 2pm
Wilberforce, Lecture Room 8

Walter Presents to Yorkshire

Q&A with Channel 4's foreign language drama arm, followed by an advance screening of a new series.

Wednesday 27 March 2019, 5.50pm
Middleton Hall

Researching Popular Culture and the Media

Training seminar

By Cecilia Brioni

Monday 1 April 2019, 3pm

Hoggart ‘Viewing’ Group

Led by Tamsin Boynton

Wednesday 10 April 2019, 2pm
Wilberforce, Lecture Room 9

Hoggart ‘Viewing’ Group

Led by Kathryn Blance

Wednesday 1 May 2019, 2pm
Wilberforce, Lecture Room 9

Training workshop

Conferencing and Networking

By Rachel Haworth

Wednesday 15 May 2019. 2pm
Wilberforce, Lecture Room 9
Bookshelf
Books
Walter Presents
Vintage media
Books
Books
Audience
Members
Research Students

Kathryn Blance

Jo Metcalf, James Zborowski

Tamsin Boynton

French and Italian crime drama series: how they contradict and shape views of culture, language and national identity within the context of the UK audience

Helena Chadderton, Rachel Haworth, Angela Kimyongür, Laura Rorato

Lee Rawlings

Critical Literacy in working class informal learning groups

Martin Nickson, Josef Ploner

Inspired?

Our research impacts the world. Come and join us.

Be part of a vibrant research community at the University of Hull.

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