Undergraduate

Mechanical and Medical Engineering

Hull lecturer holding up a coronavirus face guard that the University designed during the Covid pandemic.
Hull lecturer and student measuring an anatomical model of a human skeleton in the Medical Engineering Lab.
A human hand shaking a robotic hand in greeting.
Hull student sits at a computer examining a medical engineering bird skull scan.

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Learn from engineering professionals, NHS clinicians and clinical engineers. And spend time in local hospitals gaining CV-boosting experience.
Our graduates go on to work in hospitals, research facilities, and major medical device companies such as Smith & Nephew and Johnson & Johnson.
You’ll get hands-on with biomaterials, medical tech and devices, including prosthetics, orthotics, endoscopy, ultrasound, EMG and ECG.
Your transferable skills will open up careers in a range of industries. And with a national shortage of engineers, you're likely to be in high demand.
Hull lecturer holding up a coronavirus face guard that the University designed during the Covid pandemic.
Hull lecturer and student measuring an anatomical model of a human skeleton in the Medical Engineering Lab.
A human hand shaking a robotic hand in greeting.
Hull student sits at a computer examining a medical engineering bird skull scan.
FabLab

Code

Duration

Mode

This is one of the fastest growing sectors of the economy. At Hull, you’ll gain the skills to save lives and succeed in a global industry worth more than £300 billion.

You’ll apply engineering principles and scientific methods to solve problems in healthcare. And focus on the design, analysis and manufacture of medical devices, such as prosthetics or orthopaedic devices.

You’ll spend time in local hospitals getting first-hand experience of medical engineering in practice. Plus, you can even go for a whole year on placement with the likes of Smith & Nephew.

  • 100%

    of students in work or further study 15 months after graduating 1

  • Accredited

    by major engineering bodies such as IMechE, IET, & IPEM

  • Boost your CV

    with a placement year

  • NHS clinicians

    and engineers teach on this course

  • Direct route

    to Chartered Engineer status 2

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Course overview
Module options

About this course

We combine engineering, medicine and biology. You’ll get hands-on with medical tech, including endoscopy and ultrasound. You’ll test biomaterials and medical devices, such as prosthetics and orthotics. You’ll practise taking physiological measurements through EMG and ECG. And you’ll work in our specialist teaching and research labs. These include the FabLab, and the Health and Human Performance Lab.

You'll learn from experts. People who teach advanced ideas on the application of mechanical engineering for a range of medical purposes. Encompassing industry-standard computer-based methods and experimental techniques. And you’ll also spend time in local hospitals gaining CV-boosting experience. We have close links with medical device companies and the NHS. Which ensures our course is relevant and responsive to current demands and future trends in medical technology.

As well as our three-year course, we offer four- and five-year options. Choose from a built-in placement year or an integrated Masters (MEng) – or both. And Mechanical and Medical Engineering shares a common first year. So you can switch degrees in the second year if you want to choose a different pathway.

Scheduled study hours and how you’re assessed

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

How you'll be assessed depends on the course you study, and the modules you choose. You may be assessed through a mix of examinations, coursework, presentations and group projects.

Choose your modules

Each year, you’ll study modules worth a certain number of credits, and you need 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits – so you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more. In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120. Some modules are compulsory, some are optional, so you can build a course that’s right for you.

Preparing for Learning in Higher Education

This module is designed to give you the best possible start to your university studies, making sure you have all the essential skills you need to succeed. Through lectures and workshops we will teach you how to write in an academic style, how to find quality sources, how to reference work, culminating in writing up a mini-research project.

Core20 credits

Foundation Mathematics A

You will study pure mathematics topics, including proof, algebra, trigonometry, differentiation, integration, exponentials, logarithms, sequences and series. The applied topic is probability and statistics.

Core20 credits

Foundation Mathematics B

This module extends the knowledge gained in the Foundation Mathematics A - pure mathematics topics. You will also study functions and vectors. The applied topic is mechanics.

Core20 credits

Introduction to Physics 1

This is the first of two foundation year modules that prepare you for studying physics or mathematics at degree level. You will study the basics of mechanics, properties of matter, electricity and magnetism.

Core20 credits

Introduction to Physics 2

This is the second of two foundation year modules that prepare you for studying physics or mathematics at degree level. You will study the basics of oscillations, waves, and quantum and nuclear physics.

Core20 credits

Group Challenge (Engineering and Technology)

Address one of the 21 key global challenges in engineering set out by the United Nations. Work in teams to identify key stakeholders, end users and potential funding sources, as well as producing an engineering solution for topics such as clean water, reusable energy, access to medical treatment and cleaner cities.

Compulsory20 credits

This year is designed to provide you with the scientific knowledge and study skills to be successful in your degree studies.

6 Modules

Mathematical Tools and Concepts

This module delivers essential core mathematics knowledge, including polynomial functions, trigonometric functions, series, vectors, matrices and complex numbers.

Compulsory20 credits

Fundamentals of Medical Engineering

Explore key medical engineering concepts such as the principles of forces, moments, and basic stress analysis concepts. You'll also learn human anatomy and physiology. 

Compulsory20 credits

Introduction to Design and Mechanical Engineering Practice

Learn the principles of mechanical engineering and put them into practice. Cover the key topics of computer aided design (CAD), experimental work/laboratory exercises, manufacturing safety, processes and practice.

 

 

Compulsory20 credits

Mathematics and Engineering Thermodynamics

Develop mathematical skills in calculus and explore fundamental concepts in engineering thermodynamics, including heat engine cycles and their applications.

Compulsory20 credits

Mechanical Engineering Science

Analyse and determine equilibrium conditions and the state of stress for defined mechanical systems, and describe processing routes and factors that influence the properties of engineering materials.

Compulsory20 credits

Engineering Global Challenge 1

Develop and enhance a range of professional skills as a basis for professional registration as an Incorporated or Chartered Engineer. 

Compulsory20 credits
6 Modules

Physiological Measurement and Maths

This module introduces you to physiological measurements in the context of medical engineering, including the devices used in clinical practice. 

Compulsory20 credits

Mechanical Engineering Design

An opportunity to apply engineering design tools and techniques to solve real-world engineering problems. This module will take you through the product design process right from initial design specification, though to manufacturing planning and prescription.

Compulsory20 credits

NHS Medical Engineering in Practice and Stress Analysis

Gain first-hand experience of medical engineering in the healthcare setting by spending time in a number of different departments in local NHS hospitals. 

Compulsory20 credits

Mathematics and Fluid Mechanics for Mechanical Engineers

Gain knowledge and hands-on experience of using a range of mathematical functions and techniques to solve engineering problems. 

Compulsory20 credits

Materials and Manufacture

Explore the reasons engineering structures can fail, sometimes unexpectedly, through fatigue and fast fracture, corrosion and creep, as well as processes to reduce such problems. 

Compulsory20 credits

Engineering Global Challenge 2

Develop and enhance a range of professional skills as a basis for professional registration as an Incorporated or Chartered Engineer. 

Compulsory20 credits
6 Modules

Individual Project (Mechanical Engineering)

Apply and extend your engineering knowledge and professional skills by working on a substantial individual project throughout the academic year.

Core40 credits

Stress Analysis and Applications of Finite Element Analysis

Examine advanced theories and techniques to solve stress-analysis problems. The theory and application of finite element analysis is also covered using industry-standard software.

Compulsory20 credits

Prosthetics, Orthotics and Assistive Technologies

Study the principles and biomechanics behind the design of prosthetics, orthotics and assistive devices.

Compulsory20 credits

Biomaterials and Orthopaedic Devices

Examine the key structural biological materials in the human body. And learn about the biomedical materials available to medical engineers for implantation in the body.

Compulsory20 credits

Artificial Organs and CADCAM for Medical Engineering

Explore devices for the replacement or augmentation of bodily functions and their application; the principles behind their design; and the processes and technology used to manufacture these devices.

Compulsory20 credits

Your final year allows you to put your knowledge into practice, undertaking a major medical engineering project. This involves working at a professional level, often in conjunction with clinicians from local hospitals or medical companies.

5 Modules

Your placement is your opportunity to get some real-world work experience under your belt.

Just like in the real world, you’ll be responsible for finding and applying for opportunities, with the added benefit of help and support from university services such as the Careers and Employability service based in Student Central.

Engineering Group Project

Apply and extend engineering knowledge and professional skills by working in a team on a substantial project throughout the academic year, supported by a supervisor.

Core40 credits

Medical Imaging, Processing and Analysis

You'll become familiar with the use of professional image processing systems and the full workflow from image acquisition to interpretation in a range of imaging modalities.

Compulsory20 credits

Musculoskeletal Modelling

You'll gain the necessary experience and practical skills to undertake complex biomechanical analyses using AnyBody musculoskeletal modelling software.

Compulsory20 credits

Medical Device Development and Cardiovascular Devices

Explore the regulatory requirements and processes that must be followed to meet current medical device directives and obtain device certification, such as the CE mark. 

Compulsory20 credits

Human Locomotion in Health and Clinical Practice

Looking at biomechanical analyses in a clinical setting, explore topics such as lower-limb amputation, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, normal development, and ageing.

Compulsory20 credits
5 Modules

This course is accredited by

Playlist

Engineering in 60s

Course Overview 1 min

A year in industry

Course highlight 2 mins

Engineering facilities

Course highlight 1 min

Accommodation at Hull

University Life 2 mins

Entry requirements

What do I need?

When it comes to applying to university, you'll need a certain number of UCAS points. Different qualifications and grades are worth a different amount of points. For this course, you'll need…

We consider experience and qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations above.

But it's not just about the grades - we'll look at your whole application. We want to know what makes you tick, and about your previous experience, so make sure that you complete your personal statement.

Have questions? Our admissions team will be happy to help.

What do I need?

If you require a student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

See other English language proficiency qualifications accepted by the University of Hull.

If your English currently does not reach the University’s required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees & funding

How much is it?

Additional costs you may have to pay

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme. There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make:

  • Books (you can borrow books on your reading lists from the library, but you may buy your own)
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (incl. travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (incl. travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel, food and more.

How do I pay for it?

How much is it?

Additional costs you may have to pay

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme. There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make:

  • Books (you can borrow books on your reading lists from the library, but you may buy your own)
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (incl. travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (incl. travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel, food and more.

How do I pay for it?

Take a look at our facilities

FabLab

Equipped with the latest 3D printers, laser scanners and cutters, and CNC machines. This is where you’ll digitally fabricate models and prototypes. Then test them.

Centre for Medical Engineering and Technology

Get exclusive access to our medical engineering labs. Here, you’ll get hands-on with medical tech, test biomaterials and medical devices, and practise taking physiological measurements.

Health and Human Performance Lab

This £1.5 million laboratory is a state-of-the-art facility for teaching, research and sport science support in the field of biomechanics.

HERT simulators

Become part of our Hull Electric Racing Team (HERT). As a member of HERT, you’ll help to build a single seater racing car and compete against other students at Silverstone.

See more in our virtual tour

Look around

Look around

Look around

Hull Electric Racing Team F1 Simulator
FabLab
Centre for Medical Engineering and Technology
Sports, Health and Exercise Science Biomechanics Lab
Hull Electric Racing Team F1 Simulator
Three Hull Clinical Anatomy students in lab coats, and one lecturer, examining anatomical models.

Future prospects

Medical engineers often work in hospitals, research facilities and regulatory agencies. Major companies, such as Smith & Nephew (who are based near Hull) and Johnson & Johnson, employ graduates. And many of our students receive offers before they graduate.

Your transferable skills will also open up careers across a range of industries. And with a national shortage of engineers, you're likely to be in high demand.

Our course is fully accredited. This shows employers you’ve studied a degree that meets globally recognised standards. It also puts you on the pathway to Chartered Engineer status. We’re also in the process of becoming accredited by the Women in Engineering Society.

University of Hull Open Day

Your next steps

Like what you’ve seen? Then it’s time to apply.

The standard way to apply for this course is through UCAS. This will give you the chance to showcase your skill, qualities and passion for the subject, as well as providing your academic qualifications.

Not ready to apply?

Visit our next Open Day, and see all that Hull has to offer for yourself. Talk to our lecturers about your subject, find out what university is really like from our current students, and take a tour of our beautiful campus and amazing facilities.

  1. (Medical Engineering) UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Higher Education Graduate Outcomes statistics, for the academic year 2020/21, published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency June 2023.
  2. Our degrees are fully accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). Our BEng courses fully meet the academic requirements for registration as an Incorporated Engineer, and partly for Chartered Engineer. Our MEng degrees fully meet the academic requirements for becoming a Chartered Engineer.

 

All modules presented on this course page are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

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