medical

Undergraduate

BEng Biomedical Engineering

93% student satisfaction in Medical and Biomedical Engineering, ranking us 2nd in the UK.*

Key information

Study mode

Full-time

Course length

3 years

Typical offer

120 points

A Level grades: BBB

UCAS code

H160

Choose an option

Start date

Course overview

Biomedical Engineering deals with the development of medical devices – in particular, those related to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine which can be used to replace or regenerate cells, tissues and organs.

You'll be taught by experienced engineering professionals and by NHS clinicians and clinical engineers from local hospitals. Through a combination of virtual learning systems and traditional teaching, you'll develop the techniques to solve complex problems.

You'll also learn practical dissection skills in the lab to gain a complete understanding of human anatomy and the medical engineering issues which may arise for surgeons.

Biomedical Engineering at Hull is highly rated by our students. We're ranked second in the UK for student satisfaction in Medical and Biomedical Engineering and number 1 for the organisation and management of the course. And we're in the top ten for teaching, learning opportunities, assessment and feedback, academic support, learning resources and community and student voice too*.

Learn more about your course in our subject sessions

On-demand session

Engineering

engineering-subject-session

Six reasons to study Biomedical Engineering at Hull

  1. 93% student satisfaction in Medical and Biomedical Engineering, ranking us 2nd in the UK.*
  2. Accredited by three leading industry bodies#
  3. Direct pathway to becoming a Chartered Engineer
  4. Close links with industry and NHS clinicians
  5. Study advanced ideas using the latest tech
  6. Hands-on lab work including surgical techniques

What you'll study

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

First year modules

  • Compulsory

    Engineering Global Challenge I

    Learn the basics of CAD (SolidWorks) and apply the skills to solve a defined contemporary problem as part of an interdisciplinary engineering team.

    Fundamentals of Engineering

    Introducing the key principles and concepts of mechanical and electrical and electronic engineering; ranging from digital electronics to basic stress analysis concepts.

    Mathematics for Engineers

    Gain knowledge of the characteristics of a range of functions and techniques appropriate to engineering, developing expertise in analysis, interpretation and problem solving.

    Practical Skills for Engineers

    An introduction to key experiments and construction skills required for electrical and electronic engineers, as well as hands-on experience in the mechanical engineering manufacturing workshop.

    Programming and Control

    Communication of mathematical problems and solutions, as well as logic simulation and C programming results for academic, specialist and non-specialist audiences.

    Thermofluids

    Gain knowledge, comprehension and hands-on experience of using a range of mathematical functions and techniques appropriate to the application of Engineering Thermofluids to engineering processes.

Second year modules

  • Compulsory

    Physiological Measurement and Maths

    This module introduces you to physiological measurements in the context of medical engineering, including the devices used in clinical practice. 

    Mechanical Engineering Design

    An opportunity to apply engineering design tools and techniques to solve real-world engineering problems. This module will take you through the product design process right from initial design specification, though to manufacturing planning and prescription.

    NHS Medical Engineering in Practice and Stress Analysis

    Gain first-hand experience of medical engineering in the healthcare setting by spending time in a number of different departments in local NHS hospitals. 

    Introduction to Cell Mechanobiology and Maths

    Learn how cells detect, modify, and respond to physical and chemical stimuli within the extra cellular matrix. This module also develops core engineering skills in engineering maths.

    Materials and Manufacture

    Explore the reasons engineering structures can fail, sometimes unexpectedly, through fatigue and fast fracture, corrosion and creep, as well as processes to reduce such problems. 

    Engineering Global Challenge 2

    Develop and enhance a range of professional skills as a basis for professional registration as an Incorporated or Chartered Engineer. 

Placement year modules

Your placement is your opportunity to get some real-world work experience under your belt.

Just like in the real world, you’ll be responsible for finding and applying for opportunities, with the added benefit of help and support from university services such as the Careers and Employability service based in Student Central.

The work you do will be logged and assessed and will count towards your final degree result.

Final year modules

  • Core

    Individual Project (Medical Engineering)

    Apply and extend your engineering knowledge and professional skills by working on a substantial individual project throughout the academic year.

  • Compulsory

    Stress Analysis and Applications of Finite Element Analysis

    Examine advanced theories and techniques to solve stress-analysis problems. The theory and application of finite element analysis is also covered using industry-standard software.

    Prosthetics, Orthotics and Assistive Technologies

    Study the principles and biomechanics behind the design of prosthetics, orthotics and assistive devices.

    Artificial Organs and Micro/Nanotechnology for Biomedical Applications

    Explore devices for the replacement or augmentation of bodily functions and their application; the principles behind their design and the processes and technology used to manufacture these devices.

    Biomaterials and Orthopaedic Devices

    Examine the key structural biological materials in the human body and the biomedical materials currently available to the medical engineer for implantation in the body.

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

How you'll study

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Overall workload

360 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

840 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

44%
15%
41%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

252 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

948 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

52%
48%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

1,200 hours

Placement Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Indicative assessment proportions

100%
  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

360 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

840 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

24%
76%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Imogen Falconer Medical and Biomedical Engineering

"The course content looked interesting, especially having the opportunity to do actual work in the mechanical engineering workshop, and visit NHS departments was the cherry on top."

Entry requirements

Typical offer

  • A level grades BBB

  • BTEC grades DMM

  • Points required 120

Work out your estimated points

Don't meet our requirements?

We offer a Foundation Year to boost your skills and knowledge – it’s a great way to make your way into higher education.

Switch to the foundation year

Points can be from any qualification on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from 

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications
  • Applicants should have an A level in Maths at Grade B or above, or alternative Level 3 qualification.

Alternative qualifications

  • IB Diploma: 28 including 5 in HL Maths
  • Access to HE Diploma: Pass Science or Engineering based HE Diploma with minimum of 45 credits at merit or higher, including 18 credits at merit in Maths.
  • BTEC L3 Extended Diploma: Engineering including merit in Maths for Engineers and Further Maths for Engineers.
  • BTEC L3 National Extended Diploma: Engineering including Merit in Calculus and Further Engineering Mathematics units
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma: Engineering including Merit in Maths for Engineers and Applied Mathematics for Engineering units.

Worried you don’t quite meet our entry requirements?

We consider experience and qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations above.

But it’s not just about the grades – we’ll look at your whole application. We want to know what makes you tick, and about your previous experience, so make sure that you complete your personal statement.

If you have any questions, our admissions team will be happy to help.

Don't meet our requirements?

We offer a Foundation Year to boost your skills and knowledge – it’s a great way to make your way into higher education.

Switch to the foundation year

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. See other English language proficiency qualifications accepted by this University.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

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Take a tour of the facilities

Take a 360-degree look at our FabLab with its CNC (Computer Numerical Control) 3D printers, laser scanners and cutters.

Fees and funding

UK

£9,250 per year*

EU/International

£17,550 per year

International applicants may need to pay a tuition fee deposit before the start of the course. Visit our tuition fee deposit page for more information.

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

The fees shown are for 2021 entry. The fees for 2022 have not yet been confirmed and may increase.

UK students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course and a maintenance loan of up to £9,488 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of our website.

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies)
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

An affordable city for students

From bills, to meals, to pints – you’ll find that your money goes a lot further in Hull.

Your future prospects

  • Medical device designer
  • Biomedical researcher/developer
  • Rehabilitation engineer
  • Clinical engineer

Our courses give you the skills to succeed in an industry worth more than £300 billion (Kalorama, 'The Global Market for Medical Devices', 2017). Medical engineers often work in hospitals, research facilities and regulatory agencies.

Major medical device companies, such as Smith & Nephew and Johnson & Johnson, employ graduates to design and deliver projects. Many of our students receive offers of employment even before they graduate.

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This. Is. Hull.

A place where we stand up to kings, do deals with the world and take a wrecking ball to the slave trade. A place where culture stands out and the phone boxes are a different colour. A place where we're free-thinking, independent and proud of it.

*National Student Survey (NSS) 2021, HEIs only.

#The Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM)