Professor Tim Palmer

Professor Tim Palmer

HYMS Professor of Cardiovascular Biology

Faculty and Department

  • Faculty of Health Sciences
  • Hull York Medical School

Qualifications

  • BSc (University of Manchester)
  • PhD (University of Glasgow)

Summary

Tim is Professor of Cardiovascular Biology and Head of the Centre for Atherothrombosis and Metabolic Disease at Hull York Medical School.

Tim obtained an Honours degree in Biochemistry at the University of Manchester and a PhD in Molecular Pharmacology at the University of Glasgow. He carried out postdoctoral training as an American Heart Association Research Fellow in the Cardiology Division at Duke University Medical Centre, North Carolina, USA.

He returned to the UK in 1997 as a Lecturer in Biochemistry at the University of Glasgow and developed an externally funded research programme focusing on cardiovascular cell signalling and disease.

From 2015 he was Professor of Pharmacology and Head of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at the School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences at the University of Bradford before taking up his position in Hull in 2018.

Recent outputs

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Journal Article

Revascularisation Of Type 2 Diabetics With Coronary Artery Disease: Insights And Therapeutic Targeting Of O-Glcnacylation

Bolanle, I. O., Riches-Suman, K., Loubani, M., Williamson, R., & Palmer, T. M. (2021). Revascularisation Of Type 2 Diabetics With Coronary Artery Disease: Insights And Therapeutic Targeting Of O-Glcnacylation. Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2021.01.017

Therapeutic targeting of the proinflammatory IL-6-JAK/STAT signalling pathways responsible for vascular restenosis in Type 2 diabetes mellitus

Florah, T., Moshapa, , Riches-Suman, K., Palmer, T. M., & Palmer, T. M. (2019). Therapeutic targeting of the proinflammatory IL-6-JAK/STAT signalling pathways responsible for vascular restenosis in Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiology Research and Practice, 2019, https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/9846312

A769662 inhibits insulin-stimulated akt activation in human macrovascular endothelial cells independent of AMP-activated protein kinase

Strembitska, A., Mancini, S. J., Gamwell, J. M., Palmer, T. M., Baillie, G. S., & Salt, I. P. (2018). A769662 inhibits insulin-stimulated akt activation in human macrovascular endothelial cells independent of AMP-activated protein kinase. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 19(12), 3886. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19123886

Canagliflozin inhibits interleukin-1ß-stimulated cytokine and chemokine secretion in vascular endothelial cells by AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent and -independent mechanisms

Mancini, S. J., Boyd, D., Katwan, O. J., Strembitska, A., Almabrouk, T. A., Kennedy, S., …Salt, I. P. (2018). Canagliflozin inhibits interleukin-1ß-stimulated cytokine and chemokine secretion in vascular endothelial cells by AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Scientific reports, 8(1), https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-23420-4

Interaction of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 with cavin-1 links SOCS3 function and cavin-1 stability

Williams, J. J., Alotaiq, N., Mullen, W., Burchmore, R., Liu, L., Baillie, G. S., …Palmer, T. M. (2018). Interaction of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 with cavin-1 links SOCS3 function and cavin-1 stability. Nature communications, 9(1), https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-02585-y

Research interests

Professor Palmer’s interests are identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for cardiovascular disease. Localised inflammation of branch points within large blood vessels is a pivotal event in the development of atherosclerotic plaque responsible for hear attack and stroke. Inflammation is driven by long-term exposure to chemical signals termed "cytokines" which trigger multiple pathways that ultimately lead to the defective vascular cell function responsible for cardiovascular disease. These processes are also responsible for the failure of bypass and stenting procedures used for acute treatment of patients who have suffered a heart attack.

Postgraduate supervision

Enquiries from prospective students welcome. 16 students successfully supervised to completion.

Current topics:-

1. Defining mechanisms linking anti-inflammatory signalling with protection of the vasculature from mechanical stress.

2. Identification of novel glucose-dependent alterations responsible for platelet dysfunction in Type 2 diabetes.

3. Defining the molecular basis for re-purposing anti-hyperglycaemic drugs to manage thrombosis in myeloproliferative neoplasm patients.

Awards and prizes

Basic Science Postdoctoral Research Fellow

1996 - 1997

Awarded by American Heart Association (North Caroline affiliate)

Journal editorial role

Editorial Board Member

2018

Editorial Board of Cellular Signalling (Elsevier)

Membership/Fellowship of professional body

Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy

2017