Dr James Gilbert

Dr James Gilbert

Lecturer in Zoology/ Deputy Programme Leader, Zoology

Faculty and Department

  • Faculty of Science and Engineering
  • Department of Biological and Marine Sciences

Summary

James completed his PhD on the evolution of insect parental care at Cambridge, and a Marie Curie Fellowship on social behaviour at the Universities of Sydney and Sussex, before joining Hull in 2015.

Recent outputs

View more outputs

Journal Article

Predation drives recurrent convergence of an interspecies mutualism

Feeney, W. E., Brooker, R. M., Johnston, L. N., Gilbert, J. D., Besson, M., Lecchini, D., …Manica, A. (2019). Predation drives recurrent convergence of an interspecies mutualism. Ecology letters, 22(2), 256-264. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13184

Male genital titillators and the intensity of post-copulatory sexual selection across bushcrickets

Lehmann, G. U., Gilbert, J. D., Vahed, K., & Lehmann, A. W. (2017). Male genital titillators and the intensity of post-copulatory sexual selection across bushcrickets. Behavioral ecology, 28(5), 1198-1205. https://doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx094

Aposematism in the burying beetle" Dual function of anal fluid in parental care and chemical defense

Lindstedt, C., Boncoraglio, G., Cotter, S., Gilbert, J., & Kilner, R. M. (2017). Aposematism in the burying beetle? Dual function of anal fluid in parental care and chemical defense. Behavioral ecology, 28(6), 1414-1422. https://doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx100

Skew in ovarian activation depends on domicile size in phyllode-glueing thrips

Gilbert, J. D., Wells, A., & Simpson, S. J. (2018). Skew in ovarian activation depends on domicile size in phyllode-glueing thrips. Scientific reports, 8(1), https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-21635-z

Everything is connected: network thinking in entomology

Evans, D. M., Gilbert, J. D., & Port, G. R. (2017). Everything is connected: network thinking in entomology. Ecological entomology, 42, 1-3. https://doi.org/10.1111/een.12449

Research interests

James is interested in the evolution of parental care and social behaviour – especially how these crucial animal interactions shape, and are shaped by, animals' nutritional environments – and the unforeseen pressures exerted upon parental and social interactions by anthropogenic change.

Postgraduate supervision

I am happy to supervise PhDs on a range of topics related to invertebrate behaviour and ecology. Currently I am supervising projects on nutritional ecology of solitary bees, and the macroevolution of insect parental care and life history, but am always open to creative, interesting suggestions. I do not currently have a funded position to offer, though, so we would have to work together to obtain funding.