Professor Iain Brennan

Professor Iain Brennan

Professor of Criminology

Faculty and Department

  • Faculty of Arts Cultures and Education
  • Department of Criminology and Sociology

Qualifications

  • BSc (Cardiff Metropolitan University)
  • PhD (Cardiff University)
  • MA (University College Cork)

Summary

Professor Brennan is a psychologist who moved into the area of criminology via a PhD in public health.

He continues to integrate these disciplines in his three main areas of research: the prevention of violence and weapon use; the policing of domestic abuse; and the diversion of offenders from the criminal justice system.

His work has featured in leading journals including the British Medical Journal, British Journal of Criminology and Addiction as well as national and international policy documents. He is a member of the Youth Endowment Fund Expert Panel and the editorial board of the British Journal of Criminology.

Following a PhD and three years as a postdoctoral researcher at Cardiff University, Iain joined University of Hull in 2010. In 2016 he led the redesign of the University's criminology programmes and is currently the Director of Research for the Department of Criminology and Sociology and Chair of the University Research Concordat Steering Group.

Undergraduate

BA Criminology

- Offending and Victimisation

BSc Psychology (Hull)

- Forensic Psychology

Recent outputs

View more outputs

Journal Article

Coercive control: Patterns in crimes, arrests and outcomes for a new domestic abuse offence

Brennan, I., & Myhill, A. (in press). Coercive control: Patterns in crimes, arrests and outcomes for a new domestic abuse offence. The British journal of criminology, https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azab072

Policing a new domestic abuse crime: effects of force-wide training on arrests for coercive control

Brennan, I., Myhill, A., Tagliaferri, G., & Tapley, J. (in press). Policing a new domestic abuse crime: effects of force-wide training on arrests for coercive control. Policing and Society, https://doi.org/10.1080/10439463.2020.1862838

Service provider difficulties in operationalising coercive control

Gormally, S., Brennan, I. R., Burton, V., Gormally, S., & O’Leary, N. (2019). Service provider difficulties in operationalising coercive control. Violence against women, 25(6), 635-653. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077801218797478

Weapon-carrying and the reduction of violent harm

Brennan, I. R. (2019). Weapon-carrying and the reduction of violent harm. The British journal of criminology, 59(3), 571-593. https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azy032

Police-initiated diversion for youth to prevent future delinquent behavior: a systematic review

Wilson, D. B., Brennan, I., & Olaghere, A. (2018). Police-initiated diversion for youth to prevent future delinquent behavior: a systematic review. Campbell Systematic Reviews, 14, https://doi.org/10.4073/csr.2018.5

Research interests

Iain's research largely focuses on the application of psychological and criminological theory to the understanding and prevention of community violence.

He also undertakes research work in:

- gun and knife crime

- alcohol-related violence

- crime reporting and victim responses to crime

- community influences on engagement with criminal justice

- domestic abuse

- experimental criminology/evidence-based policing

- information sharing for violence prevention

- diversion from custody

- governance of night time economies

- crime and victimisation surveys

Project

Funder

Grant

Started

Status

Project

Police Initiated Diversion for Youth to Prevent Future Delinquent Behaviour: A Systematic Review

Funder

George Mason University

Grant

£4,600.00

Started

1 July 2016

Status

Complete

Postgraduate supervision

Professor Brennan is happy to hear from potential students interested in undertaking postgraduate research in any of his areas of research interest.

He is particularly interested to hear from potential supervisees in the areas of knife crime/weapon violence, victim responses and interpretations of crime, the policing of domestic abuse and open research in criminology.