Richard Noble

Dr Richard Noble

Research Associate (HIFI)

Faculty and Department

  • Faculty of Science and Engineering
  • Department of Biological and Marine Sciences

Summary

Richard is an experienced researcher in the Hull International Fisheries Institute, specialising in the assessment, conservation and management of freshwater fish communities and habitats. His role comprises a combination of research, consultancy and teaching. Current research focuses on the response of fish to environmental management and fish-friendly innovative technologies for hydropower (FITHydro). Richard's experience includes research for government agencies and water companies, together with pan-European projects that developed tools for the assessment of ecological status using fish (FAME and EFI+) and projects that developed qualitative modelling of concepts in ecology and ecosystems (DYNALEARN). During his career, Richard has been involved in research that has contributed to national and international programs. This has ranged from research on fish communities in wetlands during his PhD for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds under the LIFE-funded programme that has successfully protected and enhanced the status of bitterns in the UK, to contributions to the implementation of the Water Framework Directive through EU level research projects and direct contributions to the UK Technical Advisory Group. A recent professional highlight was being elected in 2017 as a Fellow of The Institute of Fisheries Management, the professional body for fisheries management in the UK, as recognition of my contribution to the institute and fisheries management.

Conference Proceeding

Towards a holistic indicator of flow disturbance impact: fish community size spectra

Alonso Gonzalez, C., Herranz, J., Solana Gutierrez, J., Garcia De Jalon Lastra, D., & Noble, R. (2016). Towards a holistic indicator of flow disturbance impact: fish community size spectra. In Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Ecohydraulics. Melbourne, Australia, 7-12 February 2016

Journal Article

Upstream passage of adult sea trout (Salmo trutta) at a low-head weir with an Archimedean screw hydropower turbine and co-located fish pass

Dodd, J. R., Bolland, J. D., Hateley, J., Cowx, I. G., Walton, S. E., Cattaneo, M. E. G. V., & Noble, R. A. A. (2018). Upstream passage of adult sea trout (Salmo trutta) at a low-head weir with an Archimedean screw hydropower turbine and co-located fish pass. Marine and Freshwater Research, 69(12), 1822-1833. https://doi.org/10.1071/MF18125

Problem-based learning supported by semantic techniques

Lozano, E., Gracia, J., Corcho, O., Noble, R. A., & Gómez-Pérez, A. (2015). Problem-based learning supported by semantic techniques. Interactive Learning Environments, 23(1), 37-54. doi:10.1080/10494820.2012.745431

Demography of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) ammocoete populations in relation to potential spawning-migration obstructions

Nunn, A. D., Taylor, R. J., Cowx, I. G., Noble, R. A. A., Bolland, J. D., & Harvey, J. P. (2017). Demography of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) ammocoete populations in relation to potential spawning-migration obstructions. Aquatic conservation : marine and freshwater ecosystems, 27(4), 764-772. https://doi.org/10.1002/aqc.2748

Overcoming the dichotomy of implementing societal flood risk management while conserving instream fish habitat – A long-term study from a highly modified urban river

Angelopoulos, N. V., Harvey, J. P., Bolland, J. D., Nunn, A. D., Noble, R. A., Smith, M. A., …Cowx, I. G. (2018). Overcoming the dichotomy of implementing societal flood risk management while conserving instream fish habitat – A long-term study from a highly modified urban river. Journal of environmental management, 224, 69-76. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2018.07.030

Postgraduate supervision

Richard welcomes applications in any field related to freshwater fish ecology, ecological assessment of the response of fish populations / communities to environmental change, and fisheries management and conservation. Current PhD supervisions - Jamie Dodd, Fish passage performance