Dr Fiorenzo Vincenzo

Dr Fiorenzo Vincenzo

Lecturer

Faculty and Department

  • Faculty of Science and Engineering
  • Department of Physics and Mathematics

Qualifications

  • PhD

Summary

I am an astrophysicist working as a Lecturer in the Department of Physics and Mathematics and in the E.A. Milne Centre for Astrophysics at the University of Hull. I started my position in Hull in January 2022.

From October 2019 to December 2021, I worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Ohio State University, in the United States, supported by a Fellowship from the Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics. Most of my research work at the Ohio State University was about studying the Milky Way galaxy, contributing to the science of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

From January 2019 to September 2019, I worked as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Solar & Stellar Physics group at the University of Birmingham (UK), where I combined my expertise in stellar nucleosynthesis, galaxy formation and evolution models, and cosmological chemo-dynamical simulations with the local expertise in stellar physics and asteroseismology. Before Birmingham, from January 2017 to January 2019, I worked as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Hertfordshire (UK), where I worked on cosmological chemo-dynamical simulations of galaxies, by investigating how the chemical abundance patterns evolve in combination with other physical properties of the stars and interstellar medium of galaxies.

My academic journey started at the University of Trieste in Italy, where I defended my PhD in Physics in April 2017.

Teaching:

- Matter At Extremes (Third-year Physics)

Recent outputs

View more outputs

Journal Article

Residual Abundances in GALAH DR3: Implications for Nucleosynthesis and Identification of Unique Stellar Populations

Griffith, E. J., Weinberg, D. H., Buder, S., Johnson, J. A., Johnson, J. W., & Vincenzo, F. (2022). Residual Abundances in GALAH DR3: Implications for Nucleosynthesis and Identification of Unique Stellar Populations. The Astrophysical journal, 931(1), Article 23. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/ac5826

The Seventeenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys: Complete Release of MaNGA, MaStar and APOGEE-2 Data

Abdurro'uf, Accetta, K., Aerts, C., Silva Aguirre, V., Ahumada, R., Ajgaonkar, N., …Zhu, K. (2022). The Seventeenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys: Complete Release of MaNGA, MaStar and APOGEE-2 Data. The Astrophysical journal. Supplement series, 259(2), Article 35. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4365/ac4414

The KLEVER survey: Nitrogen abundances at z ~2 and probing the existence of a fundamental nitrogen relation

Hayden-Pawson, C., Curti, M., Maiolino, R., Cirasuolo, M., Belfiore, F., Cappellari, M., …Vincenzo, F. (in press). The KLEVER survey: Nitrogen abundances at z ~2 and probing the existence of a fundamental nitrogen relation. Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Article stac584. https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stac584

APOGEE Chemical Abundance Patterns of the Massive Milky Way Satellites

Hasselquist, S., Hayes, C. R., Lian, J., Weinberg, D. H., Zasowski, G., Horta, D., …Vincenzo, F. (2021). APOGEE Chemical Abundance Patterns of the Massive Milky Way Satellites. The Astrophysical journal, 923(2), https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/ac25f9

The Impact of Black Hole Formation on Population-averaged Supernova Yields

Griffith, E. J., Sukhbold, T., Weinberg, D. H., Johnson, J. A., Johnson, J. W., & Vincenzo, F. (2021). The Impact of Black Hole Formation on Population-averaged Supernova Yields. The Astrophysical journal, 921, Article 73. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/ac1bac

Research interests

The main questions driving my research can be summarised with the following themes, that are all intertwined with one another in my scientific work.

(i) Galaxy formation and evolution: unveiling the physical processes behind the formation and evolution of galaxies in the cosmos, starting from the Milky Way and its dwarf spheroidal galaxy satellites to the population of galaxies in the Local Universe and at higher redshifts.

(ii) Chemical evolution: studying the origin of the observed chemical abundances in the stars and interstellar medium of galaxies.

(iii) Stellar nucleosynthesis: shedding light on the nucleosynthesis of chemical elements.

(iv) Stellar evolution.

In my research studies, I like to adopt and develop continuously different methods, tools, and mathematical/numerical formalisms with my collaborators to have a physical model that can explain what we observe in the Milky Way and extragalactic systems.