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Collaborative and AdaPtive Integrated Transport Across Land and Sea (CAPITALS)

The CAPITALS project seeks to develop a user centred multimodal transport application and services to improve the movement of freight across land and sea transport modes.

The
Challenge

A lack of information coordinated within the supply chain has consequences such as unsynchronised ETA/ETD between vessels and vehicles, missed berthing windows, congestion due to inappropriate routing, missed loading and unloading windows, wasted driver hours/fuel, and empty running.

The
Approach

The CAPITALS project seeks to develop a user centred multimodal transport application and services to improve the movement of freight across land and sea transport modes. The project specifically develops solutions to address the lack of effective end-to-end journey coordination in freight transport resulting in inefficiency and higher cost on the maritime-to-port and land-to-port legs of journeys.

The University of Hull Logistics Institute is developing a large scale agent-based simulation platform for multimodal freight movement scenarios. The simulation platform allows testing of various strategies to manage and coordinate freight flows and to understand the impact that the CAPITALS systems can have in specific situations. Due to the size and complexity of multimodal freight flows, spanning large geographic areas, the simulation platform needs to be extremely scalable, drawing on our leading-edge computing methods and infrastructure.

screenshot from capitals simulation

Watch Capitals Project video

Watch the Simulation

 

The Impact

The system performed flawlessly during live prototype with a fleet of HGVs moving loads from the Humber ports. It allowed the drivers to know the status of their loads, including pickup and drop times based on latest ship arrival information and informed them of road conditions. The simulator allowed the system to be simulated according to several operating scenarios and evaluated according to several dimensions including loaded and unloaded travel times, number of orders fulfilled, total distance travelled and CO2 emissions. A gain of up to 20% was observed on some dimensions.

More Info

For more information, please contact:

Professor Amar Ramudhin (A.Ramudhin@hull.ac.uk), Director of the Logistics Institute or Barrie Louw (F.G.Louw@hull.ac.uk), Systems and Operations Manager, Logistics Institute at The University of Hull