Undergraduate

BA Music, Theatre and Performance

Unleash your creativity. Explore music and theatre through workshops, masterclasses and productions – with the use of industry-standard facilities.

Key information

Study mode

Full-time

Course length

3 years

Entry requirements

112 points

A Level grades: BBC

UCAS code

WW3K

Choose an option

Start date

Course overview

Live in a city with a thriving cultural scene, and learn your craft through workshops, masterclasses, concerts, shows and productions – led by specialist staff and practitioners of international expertise.

This degree gives you opportunities to improve your skills to a professional standard in our state-of-the-art facilities. You'll develop your ability to experiment with different ideas and to work confidently in music and theatre research.

As the current UK City of Culture, Hull is the ideal place to study this programme. You'll also benefit from access to a top-class concert venue and a Grade II listed working theatre.

Six reasons to study Music, Theatre and Performance at Hull

  1. 99% graduate employability rating*
  2. Top-class concert venue – Middleton Hall
  3. Access to a Grade II-listed working theatre
  4. Partnerships with top names like Opera North
  5. 24-hour access to cutting-edge recording studios
  6. Follow your passions with wide choice of modules

What you'll study

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

First year modules

  • Compulsory

    Approaches to Theatre 1

    Looking at plays from different periods and historic cultures, you'll explore theatre in discussions and performance workshops. 

    Production Project

    You will extend your understanding of performance, developing practical and critical skills and focusing on collaborative practice, which will culminate in a performance outcome.

    Safe Working Practices

    Develop competency in specialist areas of theatre production. You'll explore safe working practices and technical possibilities so you can get the most out of our performance spaces.

    Popular Music in Context

    You will explore popular music before 1980 from structural, sociological and historical viewpoints. Topics include blues, the French chanson, protest music and theories of harmony in rock.

    Creative Music Skills 1

    Develop skills in performance, technology, songwriting, electronic composition and digital audio. We explore these in practical, creative ways via interactive seminars and workshops.

    Creative Music Skills 2

    Continue to develop your skills in instrumental composition, music production, electronic composition and digital audio on this highly interactive module.

Second year modules

  • Optional

    Theatre Practice 1: Research and Development

    Working with a staff project leader, you'll develop your theatre-making skills through research and planning activities, devising exercises and practical workshops.

    Theatre Practice 2: Production

    You'll work with other students to create a performance based on what you learned in Theatre Practice 1. You'll engage in workshops and rehearsals, leading to a performance.

    The Materials of Composition

    Develop your own compositional approach on a module which introduces you to key techniques for manipulating pitch, rhythm and timbre. 

    Electronic Composition

    This module focuses on creative live electronic and electroacoustic music. You'll learn advanced techniques for producing pieces in a stereo context.

    Performance 1

    Develop performance skills using your voice or a chosen instrument. You can specialise in solo playing, small-group, accompaniment, conducting or directing.

    Game Audio

    Explore sound design for games and discover some the challenges faced by sound designers. You'll get insights into industry practice working with interactive audio and game middleware.

    Rock and Popular Musicology

    This module analyses current trends in popular musicology, including gender, race, protest, the canon and theories of influence. You'll also study techniques of rock journalism.

    Studio Techniques

    This module introduces the facilities in our Salmon Grove Studios. Through workshops and demonstrations, you'll learn to use industry-standard hardware and software.

    Songwriting

    This practical module will hone your skills as a songwriter. You'll be expected to write one song per week to a given brief, and then produce an EP of original material. 

    Music of Our Time

    Explore style and aesthetics in contemporary music, and engage in hands-on creative work.

    Film Music

    You'll analyse and discuss how music shapes films and TV shows. You don't need any musical knowledge for this module: it focuses on the interpretation and effects of music. 

    Audio-Visual Composition

    Develop your compositional skills and create original films, exploring the manipulation and generation of visual media, including animation and effects processing. 

    Performance 2

    Develop performance skills using your voice or a chosen instrument. You can specialise in solo playing, small-group playing, accompaniment, conducting or directing.

    Psychology of Music Performance

    Examine music performance from a psychological point of view. You'll investigate strategies for sight-reading, practising and memorising music, and coping with performance anxiety.

    Studies in Musical Style from 1815

    This module investigates topics and issues in music from Beethoven to Mahler and Sibelius. You'll also examine early modernism and developments in the musical avant-garde up to the early ‘60s.

    Intermediate Technique

    Develop your skills and understanding in one of the following production areas: scenography; stage management; play and scriptwriting.

    Exploratory Practices 1

    This module focuses on the skills for developing a production, including textual and thematic context, practical methodology, creative concept, planning and time management.

    Performance Perspectives 1: Making Meaning

    Consider how theatre communicates with audiences by constructing meaning. You’ll focus on making meaning in performance and how theatre practitioners construct meaning.

    Performance Perspectives 2: Contexts and Criticisms

    Examine frameworks for understanding performance from a range of perspectives. You'll explore theatre historiography, cultural theory, sociopolitical analysis and aesthetics.

Final year modules

  • Choose one

    Special Study (Music)

    Undertake an extended project with a specialist supervisor through one-to-one teaching. Your project could take the form of a dissertation or a creative project, such as an EP.

    Dissertation (Drama)

    Broaden your understanding of theatre and performance in an area of your own interest.. You'll design and engage with research in your area, supervised by a member of staff.

  • Optional

    Making Performance 1: Research and Development

    In student-directed 'companies', you'll carry out research and dramaturgical development - working towards the performance of an original production in the following trimester. 

    Composing for Film

    Discover the challenges of film scoring as you explore the tools, approaches and industry conventions. You'll also examine the dramatic and narrative function of film music.

    Advanced Performance 1

    Take your vocal or instrumental skills to the next level. You can specialise in solo playing, small-group playing, accompaniment, conducting or directing.

    Shakespeare Music

    On this module, you'll gain stylistic and historical insights into a variety of musical works inspired by the plays of Shakespeare. 

    Global Pop

    Encounter the music traditions of Africa, Brazil, Cuba and India through performance and composition, and explore the influence they exert on today's popular music around the world.

    Music, Politics and Contemporary Thought

    Discover a range of approaches to musicology. You'll cover topics including musical analysis, gender studies, music historiography, the sociology of music and music philosophy.

    Making Performance 2: Production

    You'll continue to work in your designated area towards the performance. Your production will be staged publicly as part of the annual 'Making Performance' season on campus.

    Composing for Spaces and Places

    Focus on site-specific composition and performance. You'll study interpretations including open-form works, promenade performances, landscape composition and sound installation.

    Advanced Performance 2

    This advanced module is another opportunity to hone your performance skills, either vocally or on a chosen instrument in popular, jazz or classical traditions. 

    Advanced Technique

    Explore technical skills relevant to professional practice, as you occupy roles which focus on the design and leadership aspects of your discipline.

    Exploratory Practices 2

    Through experimental practice, you’ll come to understand a range of range of styles and techniques connected to developing individual and collaborative theatre skills.

    Performance Perspectives 3: Approaching Audiences

    Consider how theatre of different eras, genres, locations and aesthetics has approached audiences, and how the relationship between audience and performance can function.

    Psychology of Music and Emotion

    This module gives you an insight into research on the psychology of music and emotion: a fascinating and wide-ranging subject that could lead to many possible future careers.

    Radio Production

    This module explores radio broadcasting as the context to develop and hone precision composition and production skills for a demanding climate. 

    Music Industry Careers

    Take control of a record company, assuming various roles as you promote and release new music, learning aspects of the record industry through first-hand experience.

    Live Sound

    Get hands-on instruction in using live sound equipment. By the end of the module, you'll have produced a technical rider for a show and completed a sound-check for a band.

    Individual Project (Music) (T1)

    Study a topic of your choosing with expert supervision. The choice is broad and you could submit a study, a criticism piece, a folio of compositions, or a mixed-media project.

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

How you'll study

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Overall workload

300 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

900 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

4%
36%
60%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

264 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

936 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

47%
53%
  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

288 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

912 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

62%
38%
  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

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Why I chose Music at Hull

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Entry requirements

Points can be from any qualifications on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications 
  • Applicants should have an A level in Music or Music Technology at Grade C or above, or an equivalent Level 3 music qualification
  • Applicants’ instrumental or vocal performance skills should be at a minimum of Grade 6 level. Musicians who can demonstrate performance at this level but who have not taken practical examinations are also encouraged to apply.

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 28 points including 5 at HL Music
  • Access to HE Diploma: Pass with 45 credits at merit

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. See other English language proficiency qualifications accepted by this University.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Our teaching staff

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Take a tour of the facilities

Students on this creative course benefit from access to our new 400-seater concert venue and performance space.

Fees and funding

Home / EU

£9,250 per year*

International

£14,500 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Music Scholarships

The University of Hull offers music scholarships on the following instruments:

  • Robert Marchant String Scholarship (4 awards, restricted to violin, viola, cello and double bass players only - £250 per year)
  • Ouseley Choral Scholarship (1 award, restricted to male vocalists - £150 per year)

To find out more, see our terms and conditions, and download an application form

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Scholarships

If you achieve

112 UCAS tariff points or above

from 3 A levels or equivalent, you could receive

£1,200 to £2,000

Find out more

An affordable city for students

From bills, to meals, to pints – you’ll find that your money goes a lot further in Hull.

Your future prospects

  • Musician
  • Composer
  • Conductor
  • Music librarian
  • Journalist
  • Teacher

Our graduates' success rate in finding suitable employment is very high, and prospects are higher still for those with the skills to work in the fast-paced theatre industry.

Previous students have headlined some of the most prestigious stages in the world, such as the Royal Opera House, the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Bouffes du Nord in Paris.

Open Day at University of Hull

Ready to apply?

You can apply for this course through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

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This. Is. Hull.

A place where we stand up to kings, do deals with the world and take a wrecking ball to the slave trade. A place where culture stands out and the phone boxes are a different colour. A place where we're free-thinking, independent and proud of it.

*Percentage of students from this subject area in work or further study within six months of graduating: UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey for the academic year 2016/17, published by HESA 2018