philosophy-1900X800

Undergraduate

BA Philosophy

Go beyond the textbooks. Gain the critical, analytical and intellectual skills that make employers sit up and take notice.

Key information

Study mode

Full-time

Course length

3 years

Entry requirements

120 points

A Level grades: BBB

UCAS code

V500

Choose an option

Start date

Course overview

Studying philosophy at Hull means doing philosophy: engaging with current issues and emerging philosophical challenges. That will help you to build and use the skills and methods that only a training in philosophy can provide.

You'll grapple with fundamental questions about the nature of reality, consciousness and what it is to be human. You'll debate the issues of the day, from cutting-edge genetics to artificial intelligence.

And you can get involved with Peer-Assisted Study Sessions (PASS), where our philosophy students hand down their enthusiasm and wisdom from one year group to the next. 

Six reasons to study Philosophy at Hull

  1. 96% student satisfaction with learning resources*
  2. Debate the big issues and challenge assumptions
  3. Carry out your own independent research project
  4. Gain transferable key skills valued by employers
  5. Fortnightly debates with students and staff
  6. Philosophy has been taught at Hull since 1927

What you'll study

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

First year modules

  • Compulsory

    The Problems of Philosophy

    We'll introduce you to some of the key issues in the subject, covering central theories and arguments in moral, politics and social philosophy, mataphysics and epistemology.

    Reason, Logic and Argument

    As well as introducing you to elementary logic, this module builds your confidence in analysing and evaluating arguments, enhancing your disciplinary skills and understanding. 

    Science and Society

    This module introduces you to the history and philosophy of science, examining the nature of scientific knowledge and practice set in its historical and social context. 

    Philosophy, History and Ideology

    Learn how to analyse the structure of contemporary political ideologies and assess the historical interrelations between key philosophical concepts and their political implications.

    The Philosophy of Contemporary Thought and Culture

    This module explores philosophical questions and influences in their cultural setting; for example, in music, photography, art, film, digital media and entertainment.

    God, Evil and the Meaning of Life

    Examine claims about the existence of God and the nature of faith. Are religious statements meaningful? Does the fact that pain and suffering exist suggest that God doesn't?

Second year modules

  • Compulsory

    Moral Philosophy

    Study key issues such as the nature of morality, moral truth and moral epistemology. And we'll encourage you to reflect critically on the foundations of morality.

    20th Century Philosophy

    Examine the key recent philosophical movements and the thoughts of figures from different traditions, to understand the motivation behind contemporary philosophical debates. 

    Contemporary Epistemology

    This module examines the nature of knowledge. What is knowledge? What's the difference between knowledge and belief? Does knowing something depend on your viewpoint?

    Philosophical Research Methods

    This is both a conceptual and practical module. It combines reflection on key questions, theories and arguments with different conceptions of practising philosophy. 

    Mind, Brain and Behaviour

    The relation between the mental and the physical is a long-standing philosophical issue. Explore the origins of the modern form of this problem and Descartes’ attempted solution.

  • Optional

    Theorising Gender

    Examine theories of gender relations, looking at masculinity and femininity, the relationship of gender and sexuality and the intersections of gender with other social divisions. 

    Environmental Philosophy

    Discuss the main problems in environmental philosophy, drawing on the recent work of philosophers, environmental activists, and contemporary feminist thinkers.

Final year modules

  • Compulsory

    Philosophy Dissertation

    The dissertation gives you the opportunity to carry out your own sustained independent research project on a philosophical topic of your choice.

  • Optional

    Contemporary Aesthetics

    What is art? Should we analyse it aesthetically or institutionally? This module also considers many interesting issues about particular arts, such as music and literature. 

    Wittgenstein on Knowledge and Certainty

    Examine Wittgenstein’s later thought on knowledge and certainty and discuss issues such as scepticism, relativism, world-views, anthropology, religion, diversity and philosophy of psychology.

    Gender, Science and Knowledge

    This is an overview of the ways of theorising the relationship between gender, science, and knowledge. It explores the concepts of objectivity, rationality and nature. 

    Key Philosophical Thinkers

    On this module, you'll explore the central themes in the work of a key philosopher in the history of ideas, considering and evaluating them with reference to contemporary debates. 

    Confucian Philosophy

    This module examines the teachings of Confucius on (among other things) education, society, politics and governance, conduct and ethics or the ideal life. 

    Detection, Depiction, Deception

    Explore the theories of the nature of photography and photographic images, centred on the contested idea that photographs have a special relation to reality. 

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

How you'll study

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Overall workload

228 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

972 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

10%
90%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

204 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

996 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

8%
92%
  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

168 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

1,032 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

4%
96%
  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Clara Wisenfeld Paine Philosophy

Why I chose Philosophy at Hull

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Entry requirements

Don't meet our requirements?

We offer a Foundation Year to boost your skills and knowledge – it’s a great way to make your way into higher education.

Switch to the foundation year

Points can be from any qualification on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from 

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 30 points
  • Access to HE Diploma: Pass with 45 credits at merit

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

Don't meet our requirements?

We offer a Foundation Year to boost your skills and knowledge – it’s a great way to make your way into higher education.

Switch to the foundation year

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. See other English language proficiency qualifications accepted by this University.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Our teaching staff

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Take a tour of the facilities

Our Philosophy students benefit from 24/7 access to the Brynmor Jones Library which boasts more than a million books.

Fees and funding

Home / EU

£9,250 per year (subject to approval)*

International

£14,500 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Attainment
Scholarship

If you achieve

112 UCAS tariff points

from three A levels or equivalent, you could receive a reward of

£1,200

Find out more

An affordable city for students

From bills, to meals, to pints – you’ll find that your money goes a lot further in Hull.

Your future prospects

  • Teaching
  • Journalism
  • Marketing
  • Civil service
  • Public relations

Philosophy, as it's taught at Hull, gives you the skills that employers look for – including analytical thinking, critical debating skills, intellectual integrity and problem solving.

Our graduates go on to successful careers in teaching, lecturing, media production, publishing, print and broadcast journalism, law, politics, Civil Service, public relations, business and the charity sector.

Open Day at University of Hull

Ready to apply?

You can apply for this course through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

APPLY NOW VIA UCAS HOW TO APPLY
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This. Is. Hull.

A place where we stand up to kings, do deals with the world and take a wrecking ball to the slave trade. A place where culture stands out and the phone boxes are a different colour. A place where we're free-thinking, independent and proud of it.

*National Student Survey 2019, HEIs