Baxter the Robot in Mechatronics Lab clean edit UNI_3232

Undergraduate

BEng Mechatronics and Robotics

Robots and AI are transforming the way we live and work. Benefit from superb facilities on this practical, hands-on course.

Key information

Study mode

Full-time

Course length

3 years

Entry requirements

112 points

A Level grades: BBC

UCAS code

H360

Choose an option

Start date

Course overview

Drones are being used to deliver life-saving medicines to remote areas of the world. Unmanned robots are increasingly sent into hazardous or inaccessible areas. And, while the demand for expertise in this exciting field is booming, the UK lacks qualified personnel.

Mechatronics and Robotics is a high-tech, interdisciplinary course that combines electronics, mechanical engineering and computer science –– and applies them to the design and manufacture of intelligent systems.

You'll learn in our new robotics lab featuring humanoid Baxter and Nao robots, and our MARC (Multi-Actuated Robotic Companion) robots.

Six reasons to study Mechatronics and Robotics at Hull

  1. New Robotics Lab with humanoid Baxter robots
  2. Digitally fabricate prototypes in our FabLab
  3. Access to industry-standard facilities like HIVE*
  4. Teaching is informed by our expert research
  5. Opportunities for placements with local firms
  6. Problem-based teaching and ‘learning by doing’

What you'll study

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

First year modules

  • Compulsory

    Fundamentals of Mechatronics and Robotics 1

    Discover the principles of robotic systems. You’ll learn to program robots to understand sensor inputs and navigate environments, and modify robots to meet new challenges.

    Introduction to Programming and Algorithmic Thinking

    Develop a practical skill that requires both logic and creativity, from understanding language syntax to constructing bigger, more complex systems. 

    Mathematical Tools and Concepts

    This module delivers essential core mathematics knowledge, including polynomial functions, trigonometric functions, series, vectors, matrices and complex numbers.

    Fundamentals of Mechatronics and Robotics 2

    Learn how to design a system to achieve a specific task. From anthropomorphic design to the application of gears and drive systems, you’ll build your own robotic system.

    Object-Oriented Programming and Principles

    Build on your knowledge of programming, to reinforce fundamental concepts and to develop awareness of the issues involved in the implementation of larger-scale software.

    Mathematics, Programming and Digital Logic Design

    Gain essential core mathematics knowledge, as well as techniques for the design and simulation of sequential logic circuits together with programming in C. Skills.

Second year modules

  • Compulsory

    Mechatronic Systems

    Learn about mechanical systems including actuators, drive systems and stress analysis of mechanical systems, through hands-on practical sessions in the lab.

    Mathematics and Control for Engineers

    You'll focus on advanced mathematical used to model and control dynamical systems. You'll also be introduced to Laplace and Fourier transform techniques.

    Artificial Intelligence

    Gain an understanding of the basic theoretical issues of artificial intelligence and the making of intelligent agents both for games and more generally. 

    Microprocessor Design

    Explore the internal architectures of microprocessors and microcontrollers, together with the mechanisms for program execution, communication and interfacing.

    Networking and User Interface Design

    You'll be introduced to computer networks and the role technologies play in creating the user interface for enterprise business web applications.

    Mechatronics, Robotics, Sensors and Simulation

    Learn about sensor systems – understanding how to interpret sensor data and integrate sensor fusion systems. This module also introduces you to simulation tools and systems.

Placement year modules

Your placement is your opportunity to get some real-world work experience under your belt.

Just like in the real world, you’ll be responsible for finding and applying for opportunities, with the added benefit of help and support from university services such as the Careers and Employability service based in Student Central.

The industrial placement is fully assessed and counts towards your final degree result; it therefore requires the successful completion of academic assignments, a portfolio and a final report.

Final year modules

  • Core

    Honours Stage Project

    Tackle a substantial piece of computer-related investigation or software design in an area of your interest. This includes practical development and evaluation of your designs and implementation.

  • Compulsory

    Robotics and Automation

    Develop knowledge of the applications, modelling and analysis of industrial robots and their assembly. You'll explore key features of design and methods of controlling robotic devices.

    Stress Analysis and Dynamics of Mechanical Systems

    Develop your understanding of fundamental theories and techniques relevant to the mechanical engineering problems in stress analysis and dynamics. 

    Computational Intelligence

    On this module, you’ll discover how to simulate real-world systems and allocations, and how to interpret processes which mimic human behaviour.

    Machine Vision and Sensor Fusion

    Key methods in image processing and sensory data fusion will be explored through theoretical analysis and computer simulations.

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

How you'll study

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Overall workload

360 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

840 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

37%
63%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

300 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

900 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

50%
50%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

1,200 hours

Placement Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Indicative assessment proportions

100%
  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

240 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

960 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

23%
10%
67%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Martin Davies Mechatronics and Robotics

"Robotics is the future, so it felt like the perfect course for me."

Entry requirements

Don't meet our requirements?

We offer a Foundation Year to boost your skills and knowledge – it’s a great way to make your way into higher education.

Switch to the foundation year

Points can be from any qualifications on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications 
  • Applicants should have an A level in Maths at Grade C or above.

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 28 points including 5 in HL Maths
  • Access to HE Diploma: Pass Science or Engineering based Diploma with minimum of 45 credits at merit or higher, including 18 credits at merit in Maths.
  • BTEC L3 Extended Diploma: Engineering including merit in Maths for Engineers and Further Maths for Engineers.
  • BTEC L3 National Extended Diploma: Engineering including Merit in Calculus and Further Engineering Mathematics units
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma: Engineering including Merit in Maths for Engineers and Applied Mathematics for Engineering units.

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

Don't meet our requirements?

We offer a Foundation Year to boost your skills and knowledge – it’s a great way to make your way into higher education.

Switch to the foundation year

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. See other English language proficiency qualifications accepted by this University.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Our teaching staff

Click and drag

Take a tour of the facilities

Take a 360-degree look at our robotics lab where you'll work with humanoid Baxter and Nao robots.

Fees and funding

Home / EU

£9,250 per year (subject to approval)*

International

£17,200 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Attainment
Scholarship

If you achieve

112 UCAS tariff points

from three A levels or equivalent, you could receive a reward of

£1,200

Find out more

An affordable city for students

From bills, to meals, to pints – you’ll find that your money goes a lot further in Hull.

Your future prospects

  • Design engineer
  • Research and development specialist
  • Systems engineer
  • Programmer

You’ll find mechatronics and robotics in almost every aspect of modern life, creating a wealth of career opportunities for graduates.

You could help to develop the latest technology – from driverless cars to drones, space vehicles to automated production lines and technology-assisted clothing.

Open Day at University of Hull

Ready to apply?

You can apply for this course through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

APPLY NOW VIA UCAS HOW TO APPLY
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This. Is. Hull.

A place where we stand up to kings, do deals with the world and take a wrecking ball to the slave trade. A place where culture stands out and the phone boxes are a different colour. A place where we're free-thinking, independent and proud of it.

*Hull Immersive Visualisation Environment (HIVE)