politics

Faculty of Business, Law and Politics

Law with Politics

UndergraduateLLB

Year of entry:
UCAS code: M1L2

What you'll study

This law degree gives you extensive knowledge of the political system from which our laws emerge – it's a strong foundation to build a career on.

We have partnerships with universities across the globe, and this course gives you the opportunity to spend a year studying in another country.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Systems of Justice

    Develop your understanding of law as a fundamental social institution. You'll develop your intellectual skills and competencies, learn how to 'think like a lawyer', and reflect critically on your understanding of justice, with reference to contemporary social issues.

  • Introduction to Law and its Study

    This module provides you with a basic introduction to law and the key skills necessary for its study. In particular, you will develop and practise skills of academic writing, problem solving and research that are required to successfully study law.

  • Introduction to Comparative Politics

    This module introduces you to comparative politics as an approach to studying states. It combines a thematic assessment of key features of modern states (which provides the basis of comparison) with a country-by-country study: allowing you to begin making comparisons.

  • Criminal Law

    Develop a strong and critical understanding of the core values underlying criminal law in England and Wales. You'll focus on topics including property offences, non-fatal offences against the person, defences and inchoate offences.

  • Introduction to the Politics of the World Economy

    Explore how politics defines the power map of the world's economy and provides the constitution for markets. We'll introduce you to the principal ideas, institutions, policies and institutions that shape the politics of the global economy.

  • Obligations II - The Law of Contract

    Develop an understanding of the main rules and principles relevant to the law of contract under English law. You'll focus on contract formation and enforceability, factors that may render a contract void, the interpretation of contractual terms and potential remedies for breach of contract.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Trusts: Managing for Others

    This module will introduce you to the legal concept of the trust and help to develop an understanding of the role the device plays in facilitating and regulating the management of wealth for others in modern society.

  • Obligations I – The Law of Tort

    You will study the general framework and key concepts of the law of tort. You'll analyse the principles and rules governing liability for negligence, analyse the principles governing tort damages, consider the grounds of liability and evaluate the role of tort law in modern society.

  • Public and European Union Law

    On this module, you’ll learn about parliamentary sovereignty, the rule of law, the separation of powers, branches of government, human rights and aspects of EU law.

  • Administrative Law and Human Rights Law

    Examine the nature of the state and consider the ways the law shapes and controls public power. You'll consider the development of the principles of judicial review and how these might change, as well as the role of the ombudsmen and complaints systems, and the potential role of tort law.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Understanding States and Markets: An Introduction to Political Economy

    Discover the history of ideas in political economy, and the relevance of these ideas for contemporary politics. You’ll explore the ideas of all the major schools, including the work of Adam Smith, Friedrich List, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, Friedrich Hayek, Marianna Mazzucato, Joseph Stiglitz and the student-led campaign for greater pluralism in economics.

  • Electoral and Voting Systems

    Electoral systems aren't neutral: the system creates the results. Stalin said, “It's not the people who vote that count. It's the people who count the votes.” Join the investigation into how far systems of voting determine election results around the world.

  • British Government

    In the age of Brexit, who governs Britain? Discover the institutions of the British state from 10 Downing Street to the Houses of Parliament, from Whitehall to the devolved assemblies, and from the Conservative Party to Labour.

  • Understanding America

    This module will provide you with a general introduction to the political culture and institutions of the United States, and the environment in which those institutions operate. You'll learn about the USA’s international role and behaviour and the complex relationship between the domestic and international aspects of American politics.

  • Understanding the European Union

    Learn about the history and politics of the European Union. You'll assess the EU's main actors, such as the European Council, Commission and European Parliament. And you'll also consider its core policies, including the European Single Market, economic and monetary Union, environmental policy and the Common Foreign and Security Policy, as well as the implications of Brexit.

  • Understanding China

    This module examines the economic transformations of contemporary China in a historical, cultural and political context. You'll evaluate the major issues and challenges facing the People’s Republic of China.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Land Use and Regulation

    Develop insight into the political, social and economic issues surrounding the use and regulation of land. You'll cover topics such as co-ownership, leases, and private and public regulation of the use of land.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Criminal Evidence and Procedure

    Discover the aims and values of our criminal justice system, and learn how the law balances the defendant’s interests with respect for victims and witnesses.

  • Penology

    You'll critically analyse the purpose of punishment and, through active discussions and debate, consider whether our penal system is currently fit for purpose. Topics include prisoners' rights, women offenders, sex offenders and the juvenile secure estate.

  • Employment Law

    This module offers a critical examination of the role of law in the workplace. You'll consider the protection offered to those in work by employment law, the operation of work contracts, remedies available to wronged workers and the law on discrimination in the workplace.

  • Law Clinic

    Experience law in practice, advising real clients with real problems, researching legal issues and writing letters of advice under the supervision of professionally-qualified members of staff.

  • Dissertation

    You will make an original contribution to research by designing, carrying out and writing up your own project on a topic you choose, supported by your dissertation supervisor.

  • Medicine, Ethics and the Law

    This module gives you the opportunity to get to grips with hugely controversial issues which often make the headlines. You'll explore the ethical controversies behind the legal principles of topics such as abortion, assisted dying and the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment.

  • Mediation and Alternative Dispute Resolution

    The module has two distinct sections. The first examines the historical and theoretical context of alternative dispute resolution, focusing especially on mediation. The second introduces students to mediation skills via practical workshops based around role-play scenarios.

  • Family Law

    This module covers the study of relationship formation and breakdown, the cohabiting family, same sex relationships, the financial aspects of relationship breakdown and children. You'll experience applying the practical aspects of family law to problem questions.

  • Comparative Legislatures

    Examine the role of legislatures and their functions, looking at how they fit within particular systems of government. You'll explore case studies such as the Westminster model, the US Congress, the Brazilian, German, South African and Chinese parliaments and the European Parliament.

  • UK Politics in an Age of Austerity and Brexit

    Explore the most important contemporary political debates about economic, social and political renewal. You'll cover topics such as: Brexit, austerity, reform of the National Health Service, the future of the welfare state, foreign policy, constitutional reform and the politics of the two major UK political parties.

  • The Contemporary House of Commons

    Study the functions of the UK House of Commons and how they are shaped by the changes in the political environment. Having looked at what MPs do collectively, the module concludes by looking at what members do individually, primarily as constituency representatives.

  • Politics of the Environment

    Analyse attitudes towards the environment and the politics of the environmental movement, pressure groups, political parties, states, the EU and international organisations.

  • Critics of Capitalism

    In this module, you study some of the most important critics of politics and the economy in capitalist societies. You'll explore issues such as capitalist oppression, the nature of work, the corruption of music and art by 'big business', vanity and alienation, exploitation, and capitalism's alleged continuing imperialist machinations, as well as exploring alternatives to capitalism.

  • Parliament in the UK: Approaches to Reform

    Study the UK Parliament in the context of constitutional change, both actual and proposed. Examine the work of the House of Lords and the consequences of incremental change within Parliament. Explore electoral reform, pressure for a Bill of Rights, devolution, referendums and membership of the European Union.

  • Democracy and Legitimacy in the European Union

    This module focuses on the theoretical and empirical context in which democracy and legitimacy have become existential challenges for the European Union.

"When I researched the University, I realised that I'd be taught by experts in their fields of Law."

Angel Valchev Watch video

"I think I've developed a lot more in my own confidence, I've learned a lot about myself as well as everything I've learned about politics."

Lucy Dunwell Watch video

"When I came to study Law, I realised that they were doing so many new innovative things."

Tracey Raymond Watch video

More about this course

You’ll learn to think like a lawyer, undertake legal research and apply your knowledge of legal and political science to broad social problems and challenges. You'll get to grips with the concept of law, legal phenomena and legal systems. And you'll examine political theory and key advances in human security and welfare.

  • 99% of our law students are in work or further study six months after graduating (UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey for the academic year 2016/17, published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency 2018)
  • Hull was ranked in the top 300 universities globally for law in the QS World University Rankings 2017.
  • Gain hands-on experience providing legal advice to members of the public, under expert supervision, in our Legal Advice Centre.

Law at Hull comes with opportunities to get involved in some CV-boosting extracurricular activities. The Student Law Society runs an extensive programme of competitions in mooting, negotiating and client interviewing. You can also get involved on the editorial team of the Student Law Journal.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

37%

2%

61%

Second year

37%

63%

Final year

25%

75%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

Click map to view directions on Google Maps

Law has been taught at Hull since 1927 and our staff are at the forefront of research, scholarship and teaching.

You'll have the opportunity to provide legal advice to real clients through our Legal Advice Centre and Law Clinic.

We operate an extensive Westminster placement learning opportunity that is fully integrated within your degree programme. 

Watch video

Our graduates are so numerous at Westminster and Whitehall, they’ve become known as the 'Hull Mafia'.

Entry requirements

2020 Tariff points: 120 points. Points can be from any qualification on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from 

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 30 points
  • Access to HE Diploma: Pass with 45 credits at merit

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.5 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: Fees for Home/EU students have not yet been confirmed for 2020/21. 2019/20 fees were £9,250 per year*. The University sets fees in line with Government direction.
  • International: £14,500 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

The flexibility of studying Law at Hull means you can gain specialist knowledge in subjects of your choice and the course will provide you with skills that are transferable in a variety of professions - so you have the skills and experience that employers demand.

A number of our graduates embark on legal careers as solicitors or barristers, while many use their degree as a springboard for a career in management, business or the Civil Service.  We put on a variety of careers events to help you to boost your employability and complement the University's Careers and Employability Service provision.

Law graduate destinations include working as barristers, solicitors, legal executives, investment advisers, paralegals, translators, prosecutors and senior prosecutors with the Crown Prosecution Service, circuit judges, Members of Parliament, advocates, lecturers and teachers.

Politics graduate destinations include: Political Researcher; Senior Official in Local Government; Public Relations Officer; Social Science Researcher. (More about Politics alumni).