Primary-Teaching-Cropped

Working with Children, Young People and Families

UndergraduateBA (Hons)

Year of entry:
UCAS code: L591

What you'll study

Develop the skills and knowledge for multi-agency working in a range of areas of health, education and social care.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Developing Positive Relationships with Children, Young People and their Families

  • Learning Across the Lifespan

    This module introduces the concept of learning and development throughout the lifespan. It will help you recognise how different contexts (e.g. cultural, environmental and social) influence individual learning and development by analysing a diverse range of theories applied to the study of individual development.

  • Skills for Academic Success in HE

  • Aspects of Child and Family Health

    Study contemporary society's key influences on child health and well being and consider the provision of health care for children and young people in UK. Contemporary issues around well-being, mental and sexual health are explored in this module, along with issues relating to physical health, for example obesity. The impact health decisions and health choices have on children and their families is also considered.

  • Introduction to Professional Practice

    Choose from a range of placement opportunities in education, health and social care to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes to equip you for working in a children’s sector environment.

  • Inclusion, Diversity and Rights

    This module introduces the key principles of inclusion, diversity and rights. It explores the historical context and important milestones towards inclusion, which are examined in relation to exclusion/segregation, and integration, progressing from the 1896 Committee on Defective and Epileptic Children through to the present day.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Second year modules include

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Research Methods and Methodology

    You will learn about a range of research practices within the field of social research including the importance of ethics in research, different research methods and how to collect and analyse data.

  • Promoting Health and Wellbeing in Children and Young People

    Gain an understanding of the importance of safeguarding and promoting the wellbeing of children and young people. The module examines the legal responsibility of those who safeguard and promote children’s wellbeing and explores issues relating to human rights, social justice and multi-professional work.

  • Safeguarding and Promoting the Wellbeing of Children and Young People

  • Continuing Professional Practice

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Final year modules include

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Key Contemporary Issues in Working with Children, Young People and Families

    You will engage in a critical evaluation of global, national and local issues that affect children, young people and their families. For example, mental health, poverty, crime and child exploitation.

  • The Critical Practitioner

    This module introduces reflexive practice and considers the importance of being a critical practitioner in practice. Models of reflection that support reflexive practice will be examined and you will reflect on your own learning journey in order to apply such knowledge.

  • Professional Practice and Partnership Working

    Consolidate your knowledge and work experience and enhance your employability skills for working as a reflective practitioner within the children, young people and families sector.

  • Leadership and Management in Children and Young People’s Services

  • Dissertation

    You will make an original contribution to research by designing, carrying out and writing up your own project on a topic you choose, supported by your dissertation supervisor.

“Coming to Hull enabled me to learn something I am passionate about, work for some great organisations and volunteer for some brilliant causes.”

Katie Hobson

More about this course

Working with children, young people and families involves understanding the way that society's structured – and how that impacts on the lives of individuals, families and their communities.

  • We place a strong emphasis on your employability. So you’ll put your theory into practice through several work placements.
  • 99% of our social work students are in work or further study six months after graduating (UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey for the academic year 2016/17, published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency 2018)
  • Develop the skills for multi-agency working in a range of health, education and social care practice placements.
  • Spend a semester studying abroad at one of our English-speaking partner universities in countries renowned for high quality childcare such as Denmark, Norway, and Sweden.

You'll have the opportunity to study toward forest school certification, which allows you to lead children’s learning experiences in outdoor contexts. We also offer certified training in Safeguarding and Portage: a home-visiting educational service for pre-school children with extra support needs.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

8%

25%

67%

Second year

20%

80%

Final year

5%

95%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

Set yourself up for a rewarding career making a real difference to the lives of children, young people, and adults.

Strong partnerships with hundreds of schools, colleges, community organisations and early years settings.

Specialise in a particular age range and master advanced teaching methods taught by expert staff.

A diverse range of routes into teaching includes undergraduate programmes that incorporate Qualified Teacher Status.

Entry requirements

2019 Tariff points: 104 points. Points can be from any qualifications on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications 

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

  • Applicants should also have GCSE English Language/Literature at Grade 4 or C or above

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 26 points.
  • Access to HE Diploma: pass with merits in a minimum of 30 credits
  • CACHE L3 Extended Diploma: C

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

Any offers made are conditional on the results of an enhanced DBS check and confirmation that any health requirements have been met.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £14,000 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

The range of employment opportunities for graduates in children's and young people’s services is increasingly varied and wide. This programme reflects this high demand for well trained professional practitioners.

Students may decide to focus on education, health, or social care support work, choosing professions in the private, voluntary, health or maintained sector. Areas of employment that graduates might typically enter include: Education Welfare Officer, Special School Teaching Assistant, Family Support Officer, Home Education Assistant, Hospital Nursery Leader, Social Worker, Local Authority Adviser, BBC Children’s TV Researcher, and Independent Support Practitioner to name a few.

This programme also provides you with a solid foundation to continue further study or research. Opportunities include programmes such as a Master’s degree in Social Work or Community and Youth Work, Postgraduate Certificate in Education, or Graduate Teacher Programme.