Sociology

Undergraduate Available in Clearing

BA Sociology

Study the forces that drive society – from #MeToo to cyber extremism – and create websites, podcasts and short films.

Key information

Study mode

Full-time

Course length

3 years

Entry requirements

112 points

A Level grades: BBC

UCAS code

L300

Choose an option

Start date

Course overview

This is a truly 21st-century sociology degree which encourages you to think about the society of the future, as well as listening to the marginalised voices of today.

Our approach is based on visual sociology. So that’s things like photography, advertising, tattoos, computer icons or filmmaking in a sociological context, for instance.

You can choose from a range of modules covering topics including identity, digital life, politics, inequalities, social justice, popular culture and evil. You’ll pursue your own areas of interest and develop your understanding of the world and the people around you.

Apply now through clearing

01482 462236 Apply online

6 reasons to study Sociology at Hull

  1. 99% graduate employability rating#
  2. Field trips to locations like the V&A in London
  3. Create blogs, podcasts, websites and videos
  4. Gain the skills to explain the ever-changing world
  5. Engage with key issues such as identity politics
  6. Build your research and public speaking skills

What you'll study

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

First year modules

  • Compulsory

    Visualising the Other

    This module will introduce you to the concept and idea of the 'other'. You will be exploring how difference is socially constructed, how it plays out on a visual level and how visual material is used to include some and exclude others.

    Introducing the Sociological Imagination

    This module maps the relationship between the individual and society. It will encourage you to think of yourself as a sociologist and to consider your place in the world.

    World Perspectives: Understanding Global Diversity

    This module will introduce you to sociological debates about global cultural difference and diversity. You'll learn to question taken-for-granted assumptions about global cultural difference and diversity and come to understand that they are often products of particular socio-historical circumstances.

    Social Theory: The Question of Modernity

    Discover how the kind of society we live in has been theorised over the last 150 years by exploring the work of 'the founding fathers'; Marx, Durkheim and Weber and their 'offspring', including major theorists like Bourdieu.

    Collecting Social Data

    The module takes an integrative approach to research ethics and design. This provides a foundation for critical skills in understanding research, as well as the practical skills to conduct independent research.

    Apocalypse and Utopia

    Narratives of the end of the world are omnipresent in popular culture. You will study the relevance of apocalyptic and utopian narratives and how they are used to elicit hope or instil fear in politics, urban planning, technology research, or warfare. You will also be introduced to key technical skills important for today's digital society.

Second year modules

  • Compulsory

    Exploring Post-Theory

    This module continues the exploration of social theory by going beyond the mainstream and the conventional. It introduces excluded and marginalised voices: post-feminists, 'queers', ex-colonials, post-modernists and post-humans.

    Visual and Material Cultures

    Explore how visual phenomena, such as popular media, and material objects, such as fashion and food, express norms and produce culture. You will become a visual researcher yourself and create a piece of visual research.

    Inequalities, Social Divisions and Social Conflict

    In the era of austerity, social mobility in the UK has flatlined and social inequalities have become a cause for increasing political debate and public disquiet. You will consider the following topics: the relationship between politics, power and inequalities; the form and scale of inequalities; social class and social divisions; inequalities in relation to gender, ‘race’ and disability; the ‘problem of youth’; and the causes and consequences of social conflict through the window of the English riots, 2011.

    Digital Citizens and Participatory Cultures

    On this module, you’ll learn how to critically analyse social media for its cultural content and the creation of new knowledge.

    Analysing Social Data

    This module builds on the Collecting Social Data research methods module and focuses on the next stages of social research, involving analysis and interpretation of research data. You will cover a range of approaches for analysis and interpretation of a variety of qualitative and quantitative social research data.

    Decolonising Otherness

    Learn about the 'otherness' of the non-Western other and how its most misunderstood beliefs and practices - magic, ritual and myth - can be de-colonised and become familiar.

Final year modules

  • Compulsory

    Sociology Dissertation and Writing Ethnography Dissertation

    Become an expert in an area that sparks your interest. You’ll investigate and research your topic and then present your findings in a professional and polished way.

    Sociology of Popular Culture

    Examine the social significance of popular culture and investigate how it can both reinforce and challenge inequalities of race, class, gender and sexuality. You'll explore key theories and concepts by engaging with a variety of popular cultural forms. A series of workshops also integrate feedback and feed-forward sessions that assess current performance and offer constructive guidance on how to do better.

    Sociology at Work

    Learn about human development theory and apply this knowledge through the investigation of recent UK employment policy and labour market institutions.

    Modern Day Slavery in the UK

    Modern Slavery in the UK has risen exponentially over the past 20 years, from a few thousand victims at the turn of the Millennium, to an estimated 136,000 today (Global Slavery Index, 2018).  You will consider internationally recognised definitions of modern slavery and of how its incidence and scale is measured. 

  • Optional

    Understanding and Interpreting Quantitative Data

    This module provides valuable quantitative research skills required for the dissertation and the job market. You will learn how to present quantitative results in a meaningful and informative way and to develop skills that allow you to accurately interpret and critically assess statistical output.

    Cyberterrorism and Extremism

    The work you will do reflects real-world practice as you look closer at what’s happening in the world today, and discuss and debate key terms such as ‘cyber’, 'radicalisation', 'terrorism', ‘extremism’ and 'violent extremism'. 

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

How you'll study

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Overall workload

240 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

960 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

100%
  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

240 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

960 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

100%
  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

156 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

1044 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

18%
82%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Dan-Norton
Dan Norton Sociology

Why I chose Sociology at Hull

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Entry Requirements

During Clearing we look at all of your qualifications and experience, not just your academic grades – you’re more than just letters on a page!

Some courses still do have requirements such as previous study in your subject area, or specific GCSE grades. Others have additional requirements such as an interview or a satisfactory DBS check.

Please call us now on 01482 462236 to find out if we have a course that’s suitable for you.

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. See other English language proficiency qualifications accepted by this University.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Our teaching staff

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Take a tour of the facilities

Students on this programme enjoy 24/7 access to the recently restored Brynmor Jones Library which boasts more than a million books.

Fees & funding

Home / EU

£9,250 per year*

International

£14,000 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Attainment
Scholarship

If you achieve

112 UCAS tariff points

from three A levels or equivalent, you could receive a reward of

£1,200

Find out more

An affordable city for students

From bills, to meals, to pints – you’ll find that your money goes a lot further in Hull.

Your future prospects

  • Youth worker
  • Community development worker
  • Teaching
  • International aid worker
  • Social researcher

From the start of your course, a friendly team of experienced careers advisers, employer liaison and information staff are here to assist you, whether or not you have any firm ideas about the next step in your career.

We run an extensive programme of events to develop your career awareness and help you explore opportunities, including employer talks and careers fairs.

Open Day at University of Hull

Ready to apply?

You can apply for this course through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

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This. Is. Hull.

A place where we stand up to kings, do deals with the world and take a wrecking ball to the slave trade. A place where culture stands out and the phone boxes are a different colour. A place where we're free-thinking, independent and proud of it.

#Percentage of social sciences students in work or further study within six months of graduating: UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey for the academic year 2016/17, published by HESA 2018