Sociology

Faculty of Arts, Cultures and Education

Sociology

UndergraduateBA (Hons)

Year of entry:
UCAS code: L300

What you'll study

Study the forces that drive society – from Brexit to #MeToo – creating websites, podcasts, photo blogs and short videos.

We offer a foundation year to boost your skills and knowledge if you don't quite meet our academic entry requirements.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Visualising the Other

    This module will introduce you to the concept and idea of the "other". You will be exploring how difference is socially constructed, how they play out on a visual level, and how visual material is used to include some and exclude others.

  • Introducing the Sociological Imagination

    This module maps the relationship between the individual and society. It will encourage you to think of yourself as a sociologist and to consider your place in the world.

  • World Perspectives: Understanding Global Diversity

    This module will introduce you to sociological debates about global cultural difference and diversity. You'll earn to question taken for granted assumptions about global cultural difference and diversity and learn that they are often products of particular socio-historical circumstances.

  • Social Theory: The Question of Modernity

    Discover how the kind of society we live in has been theorised over the last 150 years by exploring the work of 'the founding fathers'; Marx, Durkheim and Weber and their 'offspring', including major theorists like Bourdieu.

  • Collecting Social Data

    The module takes an integrative approach to research ethics and design. This provides a foundation for critical skills in understanding research, as well as the practical skills to conduct independent research.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Apocalypse and Utopia

    Narratives of the end of the world are omnipresent in popular culture. You will study the relevance of apocalyptic and utopian narratives and how they are used to elicit hope or instil fear in politics, urban planning, technology research, or warfare. You will also be introduced to key technical skills important for today's digital society.

  • Passport Languages

    The Passport Foreign Language scheme provides you with the opportunity to develop your language skills. You can join a module to learn a new foreign language or to improve your existing language skills and intercultural competence. Languages include French, German, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Chinese, Japanese and Russian.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Exploring Post-Theory

    This module continues the exploration of social theory by going beyond the mainstream and the conventional. It introduces excluded and marginalised voices: post-feminists, 'queers', ex-colonials, post-modernists and post-humans.

  • Visual and Material Cultures

    Explore how the visual (e.g. popular media, music) and material (e.g. fashion, food) expresses norms and produces culture. You will become a "visual researcher" yourself and create a piece of visual research.

  • Inequalities, Social Divisions and Social Conflict

    In the era of austerity, social mobility in the UK has flatlined and social inequalities have become a cause for increasing political debate and public disquiet. You will consider the following topics: the relationship between politics, power and inequalities; the form and scale of inequalities; social class and social divisions; inequalities in relation to gender, ‘race’ and disability; the ‘problem of youth’; and the causes and consequences of social conflict through the window of the English riots, 2011.

  • World Citizens and Digital Challenges

  • Analysing Social Data

    This module builds on the Collecting Social Data research methods module and focuses on the next stages of social research, involving analysis and interpretation of research data. You will cover a range of approaches for analysis and interpretation of a variety of qualitative and quantitative social research data.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Magic, Ritual and Myth: Decolonising Otherness

    Learn about the 'otherness' of the non-Western other and how its most misunderstood beliefs and practices - magic, ritual and myth - can be de-colonised and become familiar.

  • Race and Social Justice

    You will review the historical origins and current patterns of settlement of minority ethnic communities within Britain. You'll reflect on the ‘race card’ in British politics, on hate crime, on the demonisation of asylum seekers and on the politicisation of immigration. You'll consider the disproportionate and racist policing of Britain’s black and Asian communities. You'll also gain an appreciation of the considerable political, cultural, social and economic contributions of minority communities and new immigrants to Britain.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Dissertation (Social Sciences)

    The dissertation module provides you with the opportunity to study a topic of your own choice in greater depth. You will investigate your chosen research question drawing on and applying the skills and knowledge developed throughout your program.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Sociology of Popular Culture

    Examine the social significance of popular culture and investigate how it can both reinforce and challenge inequalities of race, class, gender and sexuality. You'll explore key theories and concepts by engaging with a variety of popular cultural forms. A series of workshops also integrate feedback and feed-forward sessions that assess current performance and offer constructive guidance on how to do better.

  • Sacred Spaces-Sacred Media

    Religion is studied as a communication system that influences and is greatly influenced by various communication technologies. You will research online environments, such as social media platforms or video games, exploring them as new 'sacred spaces'.

  • Understanding and Interpreting Quantitative Data Analysis

    This module provides valuable quantitative research skills required for the dissertation and the job market. You will learn how to present quantitative results in a meaningful and informative way and to develop skills that allow you to accurately interpret and critically assess statistical output.

  • Understanding Islam(ophobia)

    This module introduces you to the concept of Islamophobia. You will ask whether there is an overlap between Islamophobia, racism, and xenophobia. You will also explore the impact of colonialism on the emergence of political Islam.

  • Cyberspace, Identity and Youth

    Explore contemporary, sociological understandings of cyberspace, place, young people and identity. This module critically engages with a range of contemporary mobile and internet technologies.

  • Transnational Organised Crime

    Become familiar with the historic and contemporary theories and concepts that inform our understanding of transnational organised crime (TOC). You will work on an individual and a group basis to consider a range of contemporary areas of transnational crime, including the trade in illegal drugs and arms; people trafficking for the sex trade and forced labour; cybercrime and online child abuse; terrorism; corporate crime; and environmental and wildlife crimes.

“The Social Sciences taught at Hull are extensive and cover a wide variety of issues, and the support is first class.”

Dan Norton Watch this video

More about this course

Explore society and social life as it's lived and experienced in all its complexity and cultural diversity. Sociology at Hull focuses on real events that are reshaping the world around us. You'll engage with key issues such as identity politics, culture, inequalities, globalisation, media, conflict, religion and belief, and deviance. You can choose from a wide range of options, graduating with a breadth of knowledge about social structures and social life.

  • You can spend time abroad, studying one of your modules in Hong Kong.
  • 99% of our students are in work or further study six months after graduating (Destinations of Leavers Survey, for the academic year 2016/17, published by HESA 2018)
  • You'll produce material in various formats: creating websites, podcasts, posters, photo blogs and video clips
  • At Hull, you don't just sit and listen, you do the subject - gaining the practical skills that social scientists use to investigate and explain our constantly changing world

You'll develop an understanding of social and cultural diversity, historical transformation, and of shifting boundaries and forms of society. The practical and transferable skills gained on this degree equip you for employment in a range of professional careers.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

100%

Second year

100%

Final year

18%

82%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

Studying sociology and social sciences at Hull means examining the forces and events – like Brexit – that shape the world around us.

Right from the start, you'll gain practical skills that social scientists use to investigate and explain our constantly changing world.

Our students learn by doing sociology, including creating websites, podcasts, posters, photo blogs and short video clips.

Entry requirements

2019 Tariff points: 112 points. Points can be from any qualifications on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications 

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 28 points.
  • Access to HE Diploma: pass with minimum of 45 credits at merit.

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £14,000 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

From the start of your course, a friendly team of experienced careers advisers, employer liaison and information staff are here to assist you, whether or not you have any firm ideas about the next step in your career.

We run an extensive programme of events to develop your career awareness and helping you to explore opportunities, including employer talks and careers fairs. We offer one-to-one advice and guidance - a truly personal service - which supports you and your career plans - and you will have a named careers adviser for your subject.

The Careers Service offers a range of services to assist you to develop the skills looked for by employers, including skills workshops, practice interviews and practice ability tests. It has extensive information, both web-based and in printed format, which is kept up to date with the latest job and work experience vacancies.

We maintain very close links with graduate employers on a local, national and international level, so we can offer you the best advice available. We also work closely with academic colleagues and student committees to provide specific opportunities, information and events for your course. Many of our academic programmes offer you the opportunity to undertake an internship or work placement.

One of the things that make our Careers Service stand out from those at other universities is that we continue to offer you careers services beyond graduation. Once you have begun studying at Hull, we are here to guide you at any point.

Our Careers Service was one of the first to be accredited against the new matrix quality standards for advice, information and guidance services.