Mental Health Nursing

Faculty of Health Sciences

Social Work

UndergraduateBA (Hons)

Year of entry:
UCAS code: L500

What you'll study

Gain a grounding in social work practice and theory, with insight into issues like homelessness, drug and alcohol abuse and disability.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Throughout your study, you will undertake two placements of 70 and 100 days in duration. We have a wide range of statutory and voluntary placements available throughout the Humber region, which provide both stimulating and supportive opportunities to integrate theory and practice.  

Core Modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Becoming a Professional

    An integration of professional values, theoretical knowledge and practice skills in order to prepare you in every sense for social work practice.

  • Human Development Across the Lifespan

    You will study child, adolescent and adult development, with a particular focus on the themes of attachment, separation and loss. There are also practice skills exercises to help you develop skills in observation, communication and assessment.

  • Social Work and Society

    Explore key sociological theories and concepts which inform our understanding of societal structures and processes. You will learn about social divisions and social inequalities which affect people's lives.

  • Social Work: Theory and Practice

    Explore and critically reflect on the role of theory in social work practice. You'll cover topics such as power; values and anti-oppressive practice; systems and context; theories of change; collaboration and partnership; communication and relationship; and the social work process, to name just a few.

  • Social Work and the Law

    The module provides an overview of the legislative frameworks in England in regard to adult social care, children’s social care and mental health, with an emphasis on human rights and values. It will provide an overview of how the law is developed, including relevant social policy and political influences.

  • Becoming a Research - Minded Practitioner

    This module introduces you to the importance of developing a critical and continuing understanding of knowledge and research and enables you to translate current research findings into social work practice.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

In year two, you will complete your first 70-day placement and study.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Social Work with Adults

    This module focuses specifically on social work with adults in the community. It will address the subject of social care for disabled people and people with long term health needs and will introduce you to adult protection, as well as the harm and abuse of adults.

  • Developing Critical Approaches to Mental Health

    ​You will study the social, political and economic contexts within which contemporary mental health and distress is situated. You'll also examine the legislative framework which governs the understanding and management of mental health problems. 

  • Becoming a Professional: Risks, Rights and Responsibilities

    This module introduces you to the concepts of rights and risk and considers this in relation to the responsibilities of both child and adult social workers.

  • Understanding the Contexts of Service Users' Lives

    This module combines theory and practice, utilising service user and practitioner input and running alongside the placement module. You will refine reflective practice whilst integrating theories, methods and models with practice experiences.

  • First Placement (70 days)

    This module represents the first social work practice placement of 70 days, undertaken with a social work agency or organisation. Exciting and challenging, this experience will help you develop and refine your knowledge and skills and will be assessed by a practising social worker.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

In your third year, you will be given the opportunity to study a specialist module alongside your second placement of 100 days and core modules.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Becoming a Professional: Decision Making and Professional Judgement

    Explore the processes of professional decision making, which will encourage you to invoke curiosity and challenge. With a strong practice focus, you will learn about the synthesis of increasingly complex information, including factors that have potential to distort decision making processes.

  • Last Placement (100 days)

    You will undertake a 100 day Practice Placement, which will be in a contrasting setting to your first placement and will include some statutory work. There are also specialist opportunities such as palliative social work. You are assessed with the same practice capability framework, but must reach the domains at a higher level for this placement.

  • Understanding the Contexts of Social Work Practice

    Develop a critical perspective on social work practice by gaining insight into the political, social and economic context, making connections with frontline social work. Service user and practitioner input will be included to maximise the teaching experience.

  • Social Work with Children and Families

Plus two options from the following

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Domestic Abuse

    Develop a critical appreciation of concepts, theories and knowledge which underpin social work responses to domestic abuse. With a strong practice focus, the module will draw on specialist practitioners to provide contemporary perspectives exploring risk, safeguarding and gender. Prepare to be challenged.

  • Working with Young Offenders

    You will study young offenders in a manner which enables you to think critically about the youth justice system in relation to the welfare needs of young people. You'll gain an understanding of the distinctive social work contribution to multi-professional practice.

  • Social Work and Substance Misuse

    Explore the physiological, psychological, social and legal problems associated with various illicit substances. You'll examine theories that help us to understand why people use substances and why and how they change behaviour. You'll also develop knowledge of a range of interventions that are helpful in effective social work practice.

  • Loss, Dying and Bereavement

    Everyone experiences loss. This module will introduce you to theoretical frameworks for understanding the processes of loss and grief, considering the way in which models of grief can help us to understand the effects of loss and change upon the individual, the family and wider systems.

"The teaching and support was fantastic. Without their help I wouldn't be the practitioner I am now."

Chelsea Higgins Watch Video

"I feel really proud to be a student at Hull. And I really encourage people to come and try it. It feels like home."

Melanie Garlick Watch Video

More about this course

Social work provides a challenging, rewarding and varied career, with opportunities to change people’s lives by working with them when they most need support. Taught by experts with real-world practice experience, you’ll gain insight into issues like homelessness, substance abuse, disability and mental health as well as policies relating to social welfare and the safeguarding of adults and children.

  • 99% of our students are in work or further study six months after graduating (UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey, for the academic year 2016/17 published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency 2018).
  • Many UK students receive support from the NHS Social Work Bursary Scheme which can help significantly with study and living costs.
  • This programme is accredited by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) which means you can apply to register as a qualified social worker on graduation.
  • Our strong relationships with a wide range of statutory and voluntary agencies mean that we can provide you with high-quality placements.
  • We are one of the founding members of the Humber Social Work Teaching Partnership, giving you access to the biggest employer of social work practitioners in the area.

Social workers operate within the context of relationships to support individuals, groups and communities to realise their potential. You’ll be an advisor, counsellor and listener, engaging with service users and their families, whilst liaising closely with organisations such as the police, NHS, schools, probation and the voluntary sector.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

7%

21%

72%

Second year

4%

96%

Final year

100%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

99% of our students are in work or further study six months after graduating

(UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey, for the academic year 2016/17 published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency 2018).

Our strong relationships with a wide range of statutory and voluntary agencies mean that we can provide you with high-quality placements.

BA Social Work graduates are eligible to apply to register with the HCPC as qualified social workers.

Many UK students receive support from the NHS Social Work Bursary Scheme, which can help significantly with study and living costs.

Find out more

We offer flexible routes into BA Social Work with the University Certificate in Health and Social Care Practice.

Find out more

Entry requirements

  • Tariff points: 120 points from 3 A levels (or appropriate Level 3 qualifications e.g. BTEC Subsidiary Diploma)

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

  • GCSE Maths and English Language Grade 4 or C, or equivalent

For guidance on which alternative qualifications are acceptable please contact admissions@hull.ac.uk or Dr Luke Cartwright luke.cartwright@hull.ac.uk.

Alternative qualifications 

Shortlisted applicants will be invited to a Selection Day and will complete a number of assessments as part of our selection process including an interview and written test.

We offer places to applicants whose qualifications, experience, references and quality of application (including the personal statement) persuade us of their excellence.

We are required by our regulatory body, the HCPC, to check that applicants are suitable to undertake social work training. All students who are invited to a Selection Day  must complete a confidential self-declaration form outlining any and all previous convictions and cautions (including those 'spent') and any medical or health conditions that may affect their ability to undertake academic or social work practice tasks.

All declarations are considered by our Support and Suitability Panel, comprising members of academic staff, a member of the University’s student welfare service and a member from one of our partner agencies. If offered a place on the course, students must also complete an enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 7.0 overall, with 7.0 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £14,000 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

As well as social worker, you could pursue a range of other careers, such as mental health practitioner, drug practitioner, community worker, welfare rights advisor, youth justice officer and housing officer.

Some graduates choose to embark upon postgraduate study to enhance their skills in therapeutic practice or research, and some return to the University of Hull to complete doctorates in social work.