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Faculty of Science and Engineering

Physics with Astrophysics

UndergraduateBSc (Hons)

Year of entry:
UCAS code: F3F5

What you'll study

Explore physics on a grand scale, coming to understand the forces that light stars and form galaxies.

You can combine undergraduate and postgraduate study on this course. Study for an extra year and you’ll graduate with a Masters degree.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Introduction to Experimental Skills and Mathematics for Physics

    This module will introduce you to the scientific instruments and experimental skills that you will need in order to study practical physics. You'll also develop your mathematical abilities so that you can solve problems in physics.

  • Experimental Physics and Mathematics 1

    This module will further develop your practical and mathematical skills. Team-based experimentation will allow you to explore aspects of practical physics and higher complexity physical problems will be accessible to you due to extended skills in mathematics.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • The Classical World

    This module delivers essential core physics covering two main themes: classical mechanics and optics. You will study Newton's Laws and extend them to simple fluid dynamics, as well as applying knowledge of optics in different regimes.

  • Gravitation and Astronomy

    This module delivers essential core physics in the area of gravitation and rotational mechanics through an introduction to astronomy and astrophysics. You will study Kepler's Laws; observational astronomy and telescopes; stellar and galaxy evolution; and introductory cosmology.

  • Electricity and Magnetism with Computation

  • From the Quantum World to the Macro World – an Introduction to Quantum Physics and the Properties of Matter

    This module presents an integrated view of matter, going from the quantum scale to the macro scale. You will explore how quantum physics can explain the behaviour of atoms and how the collective behaviour of atoms can in turn explain the macroscopic properties of matter that we see around us.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Experimental Physics and Mathematics 2

    You'll study this module through a combination of laboratory classes and mathematics. In the laboratory classes you'll develop your experimental technique skills by creating experiments to solve specific scientific problems. In mathematics, you'll learn about differential equations and Fourier Series.

  • Experimental Physics and Mathematics 3

    Develop your own scientific investigations and do authentic scientific research by designing experiments to answer a question that you create. In mathematics, you will learn about Vector Calculus.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Thermodynamics, Statistical Physics and Special Relativity

    This module analyses the equilibrium behaviour of many-body systems from a macroscopic point of view (thermodynamics) and from a microscopic point of view (statistical physics). You'll study the behaviour of systems at significant fractions of the speed of light (special relativity).

  • Intermediate Quantum Mechanics with Advanced Computation

  • The Physics of Waves and Solid State

  • Stellar Structure and Evolution

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Team Experimental Problem Solving & Project Planning

  • Advanced Quantum, Nuclear and Particle Physics

    Explore advanced concepts in quantum physics, nuclear and particle physics.

    What are the key theories and experiments of nuclear and particle physics? How can we apply quantum mechanics to solve problems in nuclear and particle physics? What is a Hilbert space?

    All of those topics will be covered using a mixture of lectures and workshops.

  • Numerical Modelling and Simulation

  • Matter at Extremes

  • BSc Project

  • Galactic and Extra-Galactic Astronomy

“I was reading up on the department and it just seemed perfect.”

Isobel Judson Watch Video

"We got to go to look around CERN - it was just a fantastic experience."

Leah Cox Watch Video

More about this course

Physics with Astrophysics at Hull encourages you to delve into the make-up of the universe: exploring topics from planets in our solar system to distant galaxies and abstract phenomena as you study with experts.

  • Study under experts in areas such as cosmology, galaxy formation and evolution, observational astronomy and solar physics.
  • The University's EA Milne Centre for Astrophysics is a focus for major national and international research collaborations.
  • Sharpen your critical thinking skills and get the chance to publish research papers before you’ve even graduated.
  • Enjoy access to Viper – the most powerful supercomputers of any university in the North of England – and tackle new questions that nobody has yet answered.
  • This degree is accredited by the Institute of Physics (IOP).

We'll give you the theoretical and practical tools to reveal and understand the underlying laws that govern the universe – from the smallest sub-atomic particle to the grand scale of cosmology. Many of our graduates go on to successful careers in some of the world’s best-known laboratories and research facilities.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

59%

13%

28%

Second year

63%

6%

31%

Final year

50%

8%

42%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

Joint 4th in the country for graduate employability in the 2018 Guardian University Guide.

Explore the universe from sub-atomic level to the cosmological under internationally-recognised experts.

Take on the big questions with Viper - the most powerful supercomputer in the north of England

Our research expertise helps some of our students publish academic papers even before they graduate.

Entry requirements

2019 Tariff points: 112 points. Points can be from any qualifications on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications 
  • Applicants should have A Level Maths and Physics at Grade C or above. Applicants taking the reformed A-level must also Pass the practical element

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 28 points (including 5 in Higher Level Maths and Physics)
  • BTEC L3 Extended Diploma: suitable for Foundation Year only
  • Access to HE Diploma: Suitable for foundation year entry only

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £16,600 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

A Physics with Astrophysics degree from Hull is attractive to scientific and technological employers. Our graduates find work in industrial research and development in areas such as laser systems engineering, telecommunications, IT and computing, medical applications and with government organisations.

A large number of graduates continue their studies after graduation. Some get funded MSc places, for example in Nuclear Technology, and others undertake fully funded PhDs, leading to research positions in institutions such as the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy.

Our graduates have found work in the UK and overseas with major companies such as Reckitt Benckiser, Rolls Royce and Atkins Engineering. Graduates are also in high demand in laboratories at Jodrell Bank, National Physical Laboratory or National Nuclear Laboratory. There are opportunities in medical physics within the NHS, with some graduates entering NHS graduate schemes, and also in education as teachers.

Our courses are designed so that employability is at the heart of the curriculum. You will learn valuable communication and presentation skills that have helped our graduates find careers in areas as diverse as oil prospecting, defence, risk management and the Stock Exchange.

You will have access to lifelong careers guidance. The University of Hull’s commitment to employability does not end when you graduate. If you need guidance on your career path, or get to the point when you would like a career change, help and support is always available