philosophy-1900X800

Undergraduate Available in Clearing

BA Philosophy

Go beyond the textbooks. Gain the critical, analytical and intellectual skills that make employers sit up and take notice.

Key information

Study mode

Full-time

Course length

3 years

Entry requirements

112 points

A Level grades: BBC

UCAS code

V500

Choose an option

Start date

Course overview

Studying philosophy at Hull means doing philosophy: engaging with current issues and emerging philosophical challenges. That will help you to build and use the skills and methods that only a training in philosophy can provide.

You'll grapple with fundamental questions about the nature of reality, consciousness and what it is to be human. You'll debate the issues of the day, from cutting-edge genetics to artificial intelligence.

And you can get involved with Peer-Assisted Study Sessions (PASS), where our philosophy students hand down their enthusiasm and wisdom from one year group to the next. 

Apply now through clearing

01482 466100 Apply online

6 reasons to study Philosophy at Hull

  1. 96% student satisfaction with learning resources*
  2. Debate the big issues and challenge assumptions
  3. Carry out your own independent research project
  4. Gain transferable key skills valued by employers
  5. Fortnightly debates with students and staff
  6. Philosophy has been taught at Hull since 1927

What you'll study

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

First year modules

  • Compulsory

    The Problems of Philosophy

    You will be introduced to some of the key issues of philosophy, covering central theories and arguments in the fields of moral, political and social philosophy, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of mind. You'll also reflect critically on the foundations of philosophy and receive training in clear, concise and accurate expression and in the analysis, construction and evaluation of philosophical arguments.

    Reason, Logic and Argument

    You will be introduced to the main concepts and principles of formal and informal reasoning. As well as giving you an introduction to elementary logic, the module provides opportunities to gain competence and confidence in applying appropriate techniques for the analysis and evaluation of arguments, cultivating disciplinary skills and understanding.

    Science and Society

    This module offers you an introduction to the history and philosophy of science, examining the nature of scientific knowledge and practice set in its historical and social context. The subject is explored in relation to some relevant contemporary controversies, such as the relation between naturalism and religion, particularly creationism, with students considering whether, and how, science is different from other modes of investigating and thinking about the world.

    Philosophy, History and Ideology

    Learn how to analyse the structure of contemporary political ideologies and assess the historical interrelations between key philosophical concepts and their political implications.

    The Philosophy of Contemporary Thought and Culture

    This module introduces and explores philosophical questions and influences in their cultural setting; for example, in music, photography, art, film, digital media and entertainment, politics and contemporary commentary.

    God, Evil and the Meaning of Life

    Examine claims about the existence of God and the nature of religious faith. You'll consider whether religious statements are meaningful, whether the fact of pain and suffering counts strongly, or even conclusively, against the existence of God. Debates concerning whether religious beliefs are merely a projection of human desires and whether the idea of life having a purpose stands and falls with a belief in God will also be explored.

Second year modules

  • Compulsory

    Moral Philosophy

    Some of the central theories and arguments in the fields of metaethics, normative ethics, and applied ethics are explored and evaluated. You study key issues such as the nature of morality, moral truth and moral epistemology, and you're encouraged to reflect critically on the foundations of morality.

    20th Century Philosophy

    You will be introduced to some of the key philosophical movements in the recent history of philosophy, and examine the thought of important philosophical figures from different traditions, to understand the motivation for positions in contemporary philosophical debates.

    Contemporary Epistemology

    This module examines the nature of knowledge and claims to knowledge. The sort of questions that interest us include: What is knowledge? What is the difference between opinion or belief and knowledge? When are we justified in claiming to know something? What are the sources of knowledge? Is epistemology reducible to psychology or another science? Does knowing something depend on one’s viewpoint?

    Philosophical Research Methods

    This is both a conceptual and practical module. It combines reflection on key questions, theories and arguments with different conceptions of practising philosophy. There's guidance and training in the investigation, formulation and presentation of a proposal ahead of researching and writing a paper.

    Mind, Brain and Behaviour

    The relation between the mental and the physical is a long-standing philosophical issue with much contemporary relevance and interest. You'll explore the origins of the modern form of this problem in the Cartesian turn in philosophy as well as Descartes’ own attempted solution, psycho-physical dualism.

  • Optional

    Theorising Gender

    Examine differing ways of theorising gender relations, looking at the basis of masculinity and femininity and these notions' involvement in the production of gendered subjectivities. Consider the diversity of gendered constructions, the relationship of gender and sexuality and the intersections of gender with other social divisions drawing on feminist sources, writings on masculinity, critiques from gay and lesbian studies, and recent work on transgendering and transsexuality.

    Environmental Philosophy

    Discuss the main problems in environmental philosophy, drawing on the recent work of philosophers, environmental activists, and contemporary feminist thinkers.

Final year modules

  • Compulsory

    Philosophy Dissertation

    The dissertation provides you with the opportunity to undertake your own sustained independent research project on a philosophical topic of your choice. This allows you to examine in more depth a question or issue you may have touched upon in another module, or to explore a new question or issue not covered elsewhere in the syllabus.

  • Optional

    Contemporary Aesthetics

    This module considers issues of art and beauty. Some say beauty is an act in the world. Others link beauty to pleasure in perceiving the world. Hume and Kant have subtle theories of this sort that need exploration. What is art? Is it to be analysed aesthetically or institutionally? Many interesting issues about particular arts, such as music and literature, are also considered.

    Wittgenstein on Knowledge and Certainty

    Examine Wittgenstein’s later thought on knowledge and certainty and discuss issues such as scepticism, relativism, world-views, anthropology, religion, diversity and philosophy of psychology.

    Gender, Science and Knowledge

    This module provides a critical overview of the different ways of theorising the relationship between gender, science, and knowledge. It explores the concepts of objectivity, rationality and nature within scientific thinking by focusing on the gendered nature of knowledge, as well as providing opportunities to reflect critically on the idea that science is a cultural product, which is nonetheless factual.

    Key Philosophical Thinkers

    This module introduces you to the writings of a key philosopher in the history of ideas, as well as relevant reading. The central themes in the work of this thinker will be critically considered and evaluated with reference to contemporary debates.

    Confucian Philosophy

    The module focuses on the Analects of Confucius and provides an opportunity to examine the teachings of Confucius on, for example, education, society, politics and governance, conduct and ethics, or the ideal life. It also introduces the word-thought-life procedure, in which we reflect on the application of Confucian thought in relation to one’s own situation.

    Detection, Depiction, Deception

    Explore the theories of the nature of photography and photographic images, centred on the contested idea that photographs have a special relation to reality. You will independently research photographic images found in various contexts. These include photo-journalism, camera phones, social media, forensic evidence, art galleries, museums, advertising and fashion photography.

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

How you'll study

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Overall workload

228 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

972 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

57%
43%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

204 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

996 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

27%
8%
65%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

168 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

1032 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

20%
4%
76%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Clara Wisenfeld Paine Philosophy

Why I chose Philosophy at Hull

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Entry Requirements

Don't meet our requirements?

We offer a Foundation Year to boost your skills and knowledge – it’s a great way to make your way into higher education.

Switch to the foundation year

During Clearing we look at all of your qualifications and experience, not just your academic grades – you’re more than just letters on a page!

Some courses still do have requirements such as previous study in your subject area, or specific GCSE grades. Others have additional requirements such as an interview or a satisfactory DBS check.

Please call us now on 01482 462236 to find out if we have a course that’s suitable for you.

Don't meet our requirements?

We offer a Foundation Year to boost your skills and knowledge – it’s a great way to make your way into higher education.

Switch to the foundation year

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. See other English language proficiency qualifications accepted by this University.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Our teaching staff

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Take a tour of the facilities

Our Philosophy students benefit from 24/7 access to the Brynmor Jones Library which boasts more than a million books.

Fees & funding

Home / EU

£9,250 per year*

International

£14,000 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Attainment
Scholarship

If you achieve

112 UCAS tariff points

from three A levels or equivalent, you could receive a reward of

£1,200

Find out more

An affordable city for students

From bills, to meals, to pints – you’ll find that your money goes a lot further in Hull.

Your future prospects

  • Teaching
  • Journalism
  • Marketing
  • Civil service
  • Public relations

Philosophy, as it's taught at Hull, gives you the skills that employers look for – including analytical thinking, critical debating skills, intellectual integrity and problem solving.

Our graduates go on to successful careers in teaching, lecturing, media production, publishing, print and broadcast journalism, law, politics, Civil Service, public relations, business and the charity sector.

Open Day at University of Hull

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You can apply for this course through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

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This. Is. Hull.

A place where we stand up to kings, do deals with the world and take a wrecking ball to the slave trade. A place where culture stands out and the phone boxes are a different colour. A place where we're free-thinking, independent and proud of it.

*National Student Survey 2019, HEIs