PLU

Faculty of Health Sciences

Nursing (Learning Disability)

UndergraduateBSc (Hons)

Year of entry:
UCAS code: B761

What you'll study

Learn to change the lives of people with learning disabilities, while gaining a range of professional skills and qualifying as a registered nurse.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Skills for Practice (Practice 1)

    This module provides you with the opportunity to link theoretical knowledge and current evidence with fundamental nursing skills in a safe clinical simulation environment giving you a firm grounding in preparation for clinical practice.

  • Essence of Professional Practice

    This module helps you become academically and emotionally prepared to embark on your journey to registered nurse status. You’ll explore the importance of effective communication, including practical, professional, ethical and legal responsibilities of nursing by utilising emerging problem-solving skills.

  • Life and Social Sciences

  • Learning Disability Nursing Practice 2

    Your first 'real' clinical placement will give you the opportunity to observe and undertake a wide range of aspects of nursing practice under the supervision of your mentor. You will also demonstrate your proficiency in calculating medications.

  • Introduction to Learning Disability Nursing

    This module promotes the role, values and professional identity of the learning disability nurse and focuses on developmental, health and social issues that span the life continuum of people with learning disabilities. You'll have the opportunity to identify a condition associated with learning disability, develop an electronic information pack and deliver a presentation to your peers.

  • Learning Disability Nursing Practice 3

    As your confidence grows, you will continue to build and develop new skills in practice. Understanding the role of the registered nurse - learning disability, is a key feature of this module.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Individual Approaches to Health and Wellbeing

    This module considers the health behaviours of individuals, as well as individualised approaches to health and wellbeing and obstacles to achieving it. You will consider primary, secondary and tertiary interventions in relation to a selection of health concerns taking a biopsychosocial approach.

  • Learning Disability Nursing Practice 4

    This module has been designed to assist you to function more independently in practice as you move to the next level of study. It is intended to help you consolidate your learning whilst continuing to integrate theory into practice.

  • Long Term Conditions and Learning Disability

    This field module draws upon a range of long term conditions that people with learning disabilities may experience in parallel to their primary diagnosis. The focus is the role that the learning disability nurse adopts in recognising these conditions and ensuring that they are treated and managed appropriately.

  • Learning Disability Nursing Practice 5

    This placement is supported by a period of simulated practice allowing you to practice less familiar skills in a safe environment. You will also have the opportunity to experience an alternative area of practice of your choosing and to present this experience to your peers in a poster.

  • Acute Presentations and Learning Disability

    This module equips you with the skills to assess and plan interventions to address the acute presentation of mental health needs that children and adults may present with. Your learning is focused on creating a safe environment whilst assessing and managing risk.

  • Learning Disability Nursing Practice 6

    A key skill you will need to develop is to be able to produce relevant information in an accessible format. This module will provide you with the opportunity to create a piece of accessible information for an individual or group in practice.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Safe and Competent Learning Disability Nursing

    This final academic module forms a patchwork test, which once combined becomes a coherent, unified piece of writing on a practice-based topic of your choosing. You will research and examine the literature underpinning your topic and consider how it will influence practice.

  • Managing Complexity in Learning Disability

    Drawing together all your learning in theory and practice, you'll consider how to effectively support individuals whose situation and needs are complex. You'll explore issues including evidence based care coordination, inclusion, optimum health and continuity from the perspective of individuals in care and their carers.

  • Learning Disability Nursing Practice 7

    You've reached the stage of your programme where your mentor will support you to lead a team within bedded services, manage a span of duty in a community placement, coordinate care for individuals or groups, or a mix of these experiences. Critical reflection on this experience is another feature of the module.

  • Learning Disability Nursing Practice 8

    Increasingly challenging placement experience is accompanied by simulated practice to include updating mandatory training elements. You'll also demonstrate your proficiency in medication calculations.

  • Learning Disability Nursing Practice 9

    Your final, extended, period of consolidated practice. Supported by your sign off mentor and academic support tutor, you'll ready yourself to complete your degree and enter the Nursing and Midwifery Council Register.

"I wanted to be a learning disability nurse to change patients' lives in a positive and impactful way".

David Dale Watch Video

More about this course

People with learning disabilities live, work and socialise in our communities but they need help to do so. That’s where our graduates come in. Half study, half supported practice, this degree takes you into people’s homes, schools, treatment units and care services.

  • Learn in the superb facilities of our new £28-million Health Campus.
  • 100% of our students are in work or further study six months after graduating (UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey, for the academic year 2016/17 published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency 2018).
  • This programme achieved a perfect 100% score for overall student satisfaction in the 2018 National Student Survey (NSS).
  • Our courses are approved by the Nursing and Midwifery Council, the College of Operating Department Practitioners and the Health and Care Professions Council.
  • A 50/50 split between time spent learning through studying and through real-world supported practice.

This three-year programme will equip you with the skills and knowledge to deliver high-quality, evidence-based health care. On graduation, you'll be able to register with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) as a qualified nurse.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

20%

50%

29%

Second year

17%

47%

36%

Final year

100%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Allam Medical Building Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

Benefit from the award-winning facilities of our new £28-million Health Campus with its mock operating theatre, hospital ward and intensive care unit.

Find out more

100% of our graduates are in employment or further study within six months of graduating.

Clinical placements from year one give our students the skills, experience and support to become confident and compassionate health practitioners.

Our one-year, part-time programme, the University Certificate in Health Social Care Practice can be taken prior to the BSc if you don't quite meet our academic entry requirements.

Find out more

Entry requirements

  • 112 Tariff Points from three A Levels (or appropriate Level 3 qualifications e.g. BTEC Subsidiary Diploma)

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

  • GCSE: English, Maths, and Science at Grade 4 or C or above

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 28 points.
  • BTEC L3 Extended Diploma: DMM in relevant subject(s).
  • Access to HE Diploma: Pass with a minimum of 45 Level 3 credits at merit, in a health related subject
  • Alternative maths – Functional Skills L2 Maths
  • Alternative science – BTEC First Diploma – Pass
  • University of Hull Certificate in Practice Skills for Health and Social Care (60 credits at Level 4 in appropriate subjects)

Shortlisted applicants will be invited to an interview. An annual Good Health and Good Character declaration must be completed and a Disclosure and Barring Service check is also required.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 7.0 overall with 7.0 in each skill (EU nationals 6.0 overall with 6.0 in each skill). For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £16,600 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

The latest stats report that 100% of our graduates are in employment or further study within six months of completing their course*.

Some specialise in areas such as supporting people with profound and multiple learning disabilities. Others go into community-based posts in acute assessment and treatment services or multidisciplinary teams. Management and leadership are desirable career options, as are opportunities for practice education and research.

Many of our graduates stay in the area. But some find career success elsewhere in the UK, and some have gone abroad to countries such as Australia.

With a portfolio of continuing professional development opportunities, you'll be able to maintain your relationship with the University after graduation. All nurses need to be able to mentor the next generation of nurses, so the Mentorship in Practice module is usually the first port of call. From there, you can progress to Masters-level study using our flexible framework to train in key areas including leadership and advanced practice. There's also the opportunity to study for a PhD.

We also work with our NHS service partners on more bespoke and specific development for individuals and teams.

*UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey, for the academic year 2016/17 published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency 2018.