drama

Faculty of Arts, Cultures and Education

Music, Theatre and Performance

UndergraduateBA (Hons)

Year of entry:
UCAS code: WW3K

What you'll study

Unleash your creativity. Explore music and theatre through workshops, masterclasses and productions, with the use of industry-standard facilities.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Music in Practice 1

    This module introduces you to a wide range of concepts in music theory. It covers different types of notation, harmony and counterpoint in order to equip you with the fundamental tools to understand and practise music throughout your degree programme, and beyond.

  • Music in Practice 2

    This module continues to teach you how to analyse music across a wide range of styles and genres. The focus on analysis will provide you with the tools to capture observations, and various means of expressing such observations, that will be instrumental in subsequent years of study.

  • Approaches to Theatre 1

    Looking at plays from different periods and historic cultures, you will explore theatre in discussions and performance workshops. This module will also introduce you to two modes of assessment: essay and presentation.

  • Music and Theatre Technical Skills 1

  • Music and Theatre Technical Skills 2

  • Dramaturgy and Performance

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Theatre Practice 1

    Working with a staff project leader, you'll develop your theatre-making skills through research and planning activities, devising exercises and practical workshops, all related to a specific performance project.

  • Production Practitioner 2

    You will further develop your technical production skills by forming production teams which simulate professional working practice. You'll typically find yourself in roles which focus on design and management (technical managers/designers, wardrobe supervisor/designer, stage manager, production manager, public relations and box office management).

  • Medieval Theatre

    Investigating a range of genres - mystery plays, miracle plays, saints’ plays, moralities, farces, interludes, fools’ plays and other festive dramas - you will explore the inventiveness of the medieval dramatic medium in terms of ideas, language, characterisation and staging.

  • The Materials of Composition

    Develop your own compositional approach. This module introduces you to key techniques for manipulating pitch, rhythm and timbre via the study of melody, harmonies, consonance, dissonance, clusters, pulses, meters, rhythms, form, structure, and instrumental effects.

  • Electronic Composition

    This module focuses on the creation of live popular and experimental electronic and electroacoustic music and builds upon skills gained in the Creative Music Skills I/II, Electronic Composition strand. You'll be introduced to the advanced techniques involved in producing pieces in a stereo context.

  • Game Audio

    Explore aspects of sound design for games and discover some of the creative, technical and aesthetic challenges faced by sound designers working in this field. Develop insights into commercial industry practice and acquire vocational skills as you work with interactive audio and game middleware.

  • Rock and Popular Musicology

    In the first half of this module, you will explore current trends in popular musicology, including semiotics, gender, race, protest, poetics, the canon and theories of influence. In the second, you'll study some techniques of contemporary rock journalism.

  • Film Music

    You will learn to think about, analyse and discuss how music shapes films and television shows. You do not need to have any knowledge of music to study this module as it focuses on the interpretation and effects of music in cinematic and televisual contexts.

  • Theatre Practice 2

    You will work with other students to create a performance based on the skills developed during Theatre Practice 1. You'll engage in a combination of staff-led and student-led workshops and rehearsals, leading to a practical performance outcome.

  • Intercultural Shakespeares

    You will study recent film adaptations and appropriations of key Shakespeare plays produced and set in India, China, Japan and North America. You'll look at issues of intercultural adaptation, and consider what new insights can be brought to the performance and reimagination of Shakespeare's works by actors, directors and other creative practitioners in a variety of contemporary global contexts.

  • Audio-Visual Composition

    Create original audio-visual films - exploring the manipulation and generation of visual media, including animation, and effects processing. Develop your compositional skills and experiment with direct audio-visual mapping as you acquire industry relevant skills and the potential to work on interesting mixed-media projects and showreels in your final year.

  • Songwriting

    This practical module will hone your skills as a songwriter. You'll be expected to write one song per week to a given brief, and then produce an EP of original material. Peer critique is encouraged, and no genre is excluded.

  • Studio Techniques

    This practical module introduces you to the facilities within our Salmon Grove Studios. Through a series of workshops and demonstrations, you'll learn how to use industry-standard hardware and software in order to create high-quality multi-track recordings.

  • Jazz Studies

    In this module, you will study the history of jazz, from its beginnings to the present day, alongside exploring how the music works. You'll also explore a range of different approaches to studying jazz from a variety of different perspectives.

  • Studies in Musical Style from 1815

    This module investigates topics and issues in music from the late 18th century to well into the 20th century. You'll investigate music from Beethoven to Mahler and Sibelius, and you'll look at early modernism and developments in the musical avant-garde up to the early 1960s.

  • Psychology of Music Performance

    This module will enable you to explore music performance from a psychological point of view. You'll investigate strategies for sight-reading, practising and memorising music, ways to cope with performance anxiety, techniques for solo and ensemble playing, ways to express music in sound and through the body as well as consider the nature-nurture debate and performers’ personalities.

  • Free Elective

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Making Performance 1

    Working in student-directed 'companies', you'll carry out independent research and dramaturgical development that works towards the performance of an original production in the following trimester. You'll be allocated a designated production role and work as part of a team in the development of your specialism, as well as the initial stages of the production as a whole.

  • Specialist Project

  • Composing for Film

    Discover the creative and technical challenges of commercial film scoring from a practical perspective as you explore a variety of film-scoring approaches, tools and industry conventions. Gain an understanding of the dramatic and narrative functionality of film music as you explore the story-telling power of music - with reference to historical context.

  • Session Musician Performance

    Experience the range of professional scenarios encountered by session musicians, and so prepare yourself for a career in this area by adapting your existing performance skills specifically for use in the recording studio environment.

  • Shakespeare Music

    You will gain stylistic and historical insights into a variety of musical works in western cultures inspired by the plays of Shakespeare from the 17th to the 20th centuries. You'll develop an understanding of musical representations of literary sources by examining musical compositions which employ Shakespeare’s works as the basis for their compositional idea or content.

  • Global Pop

    Encounter the music traditions of Africa, Brazil, Cuba and India through performance and composition, and explore the influence they exert on today's popular music around the world.

  • Music, Politics and Contemporary Thought

    You will be introduced to a range of critical, theoretical and analytical approaches in musicology. You'll cover topics including musical analysis, new and critical musicology, gender studies, music historiography, the sociology of music and music philosophy.

  • Advanced Interactive Technologies

  • Acoustics and Studio Design

    This module is divided into two parts: studio design and an understanding of acoustics. You'll study the theoretical and practical application of acoustic formulae, speech perception, the fundamentals of music, research methods and design. The first assignment involves the design of a studio, and the second is a presentation on an agreed topic.

  • Making Performance 2

    Working in student-directed 'companies', you'll continue to work in your designated production area towards the performance realisation of the concept developed during trimester one. Your production work will be staged as a public event as part of the annual 'Making Performance' season on campus.

  • Mad, Bad and Dangerous Theatres

    Examining classic controversial plays and celebrated dramas about transgressors in their specific historical, cultural and social contexts, you'll examine theatre which has striven to speak truth to power (and often provoked violent responses).

  • Modern British Theatre

    You will look at plays premiering from the 1990s to the present to consider how theatre interacts with social and political debates. You will develop skills in reading and analysing text and production as well as broadening your knowledge and understanding of contemporary theatre and theatre makers.

  • Beckett in Performance

    You'll undertake close readings of Beckett's plays as texts for performance and as texts which challenge traditional staging conventions. You will also examine Beckett's stagecraft, including the role of the actor and director, his use of media (radio, film and television) and the strategic use of stage space. You'll also be asked to respond practically through an assessed performance project in which your creative role can be negotiated with the tutor.

  • Composing for Spaces and Places

    You will focus on site-specific composition and the performance of such compositional works. You develop your compositional skills by introducing them to a number of creative interpretations of specific spaces and places, including open-form works, promenade performances, landscape composition, sound installation, and collaborative contexts such as dance or theatre.

  • Live Sound

    You will get theoretical and hands-on instruction in using live sound equipment. At the end of the module, you'll have produced a technical rider for a show and completed a soundcheck for a band's performance.

  • Music Industry Studies

    You will engage practically with a range of roles in the contemporary music industry, whilst learning about the theory and history that underpin this rapidly-evolving professional environment.

  • Individual Project (Music) (T1)

    This module gives you the opportunity to study a topic of your own choosing, with expert supervision. The choice of topic is very wide - you may offer an empirical study, an extended piece of music criticism, a folio of compositions, or a mixed-media project.

  • Individual Project (Music) (T2)

    The same as Individual Project [T1], but in the second trimester, to allow you to tailor the programme to suit your other module choices. It is possible to take both options if you wish to offer two contrasting skills. 

  • Free Elective

"The course had everything that I was looking for and when I came round for an interview day, the city and the University was just great. I fell in love with it."

Pippa Brazier Watch Video

“Hearing how passionate the lecturers were about helping you achieve your potential made me realise Hull was the place I wanted to do my degree.”

Lauren Cloke

More about this course

Learn the craft of music and theatre through workshops, masterclasses, concerts, shows and productions, led by specialist staff and practitioners of international expertise. This degree gives you opportunities to improve your skills to a professional standard in our state-of-the-art facilities.

  • Tailor your degree around your own interests by choosing from a wide range of modules.
  • Enjoy one of the finest concert venues around – the 400-seater Middleton Hall - as well as the Gulbenkian Centre, a Grade ll listed theatre.
  • Our partnerships with professional organisations like Hull Truck Theatre and Opera North can open up internship opportunities for you.
  • Get 24-hour access to our industry-standard 48-track ambisonic recording studio.
  • 99% of our students in both music and drama are in work or further study six months after graduating (UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey for the academic year 2016/17, published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency 2018)

After the success of Hull's year as UK City of Culture 2017, there could hardly be a better place (and time) to study music and theatre. On this course, you'll develop your ability to experiment with different ideas and work confidently in music and theatre research.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

4%

36%

60%

Second year

47%

53%

Final year

62%

38%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

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Hull Campus

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Our music studios and recording equipment rival the best in the industry, including one of the finest ambisonic studios in the UK.

Watch video

Thanks to a £9.5 million investment, our Middleton Hall is now a world-class cultural venue boasting a superb 400-seater concert hall.

Find out more

Six reasons to make music at Hull.

Take a look

Strong links with local and regional organisations including Hull Truck Theatre, Opera North, New Diorama and Out of Joint.

Discover your strengths and passions in lighting, costume design, set design, stage management, acting and directing.

What will the music industry look like in five years?

Find out

Entry requirements

2019 Tariff points: 112 points. Points can be from any qualifications on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications 
  • Applicants should have an A level in Music or Music Technology at Grade C or above, or an equivalent Level 3 music qualification
  • Applicants’ instrumental or vocal performance skills should be at a minimum of Grade 6 level. Musicians who can demonstrate performance at this level but who have not taken practical examinations are also encouraged to apply.

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 28 points including 5 at HL Music
  • Access to HE Diploma: Pass with 45 credits at merit

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £14,000 per year

The University of Hull offers music scholarships on the following instruments:

  • Harp Scholarship (1 award of £1,000 per year)
  • Organ Scholarship (1 award available from September 2019 of £2,000 per year)
  • Robert Marchant String Scholarship (4 awards, restricted to violin, viola, cello and double bass players only - £250 per year)
  • Ouseley Choral Scholarship (1 award, restricted to male vocalists - £150 per year)

To find out more, see our terms and conditions, and download an application form

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

Hull music graduates take up a wide variety of careers, among them freelance performing, conducting, orchestral playing, orchestral management, working for the BBC, music librarianship, publishing, retailing, lecturing, classroom and instrumental teaching, music therapy, cathedral music and instrument making. They are also welcomed by employers in such non-musical fields as the Civil Service, accountancy, insurance and computing.

Our graduates' success rate in finding suitable employment is very high, and prospects are higher still for those with the skills to work in the fast-paced theatre industry. Previous students have headlined some of the most prestigious stages in the world, such as the Royal Opera House, those of the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Bouffes du Nord in Paris. Others have established independent theatre companies, often using final-year production modules as a launch pad to success.

Your search for employment is greatly enhanced by our excellent Careers Service – one of the few that places no time limit on its services. It provides skills workshops, practice interviews, practice ability tests and extensive, up-to-date information, both during your degree and upon graduation.