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Faculty of Science and Engineering

Mechanical and Medical Engineering

UndergraduateBEng

Year of entry:
UCAS code: HB38

What you'll study

Gain the skills to save lives and pursue a career in one of the fastest growing and most dynamic sectors of the economy.

Besides the three-year option, there are more specialised versions of this course.

  • You can add a year’s work placement
  • You could study abroad for a year
  • Extend your study to Masters level with an extra year
  • A foundation year boosts your skills and knowledge if you don't quite meet our academic entry requirements

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Mathematical Tools and Concepts

    This module delivers essential core mathematics knowledge, including polynomial functions, trigonometric functions, series, vectors, matrices and complex numbers. You'll be introduced to Mathworks' Matlab to solve mathematically described engineering problems as well as to present and process results from experiments and simulations.

  • Fundamentals of Medical Engineering

    This module introduces you to key medical engineering concepts such as the principles of forces, moments, and basic stress analysis concepts. You'll explore materials that are commonly used in technological environments and explain their properties. Additionally, human anatomy and physiology is also explored.

  • Introduction to Design and Mechanical Engineering Practice

  • Mathematics and Engineering Thermodynamics

    Develop mathematical skills in calculus and explore fundamental concepts in engineering thermodynamics. Topics in mathematics include differentiation, integration and differential equations. This is complemented by topics in thermodynamics including the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, heat engine cycles and their applications.

  • Mechanical Engineering Science

    This module builds on the fundamentals of statics, stress and materials. You'll analyse and determine equilibrium conditions and the state of stress for defined mechanical systems, as well as describing processing routes and factors that influence the properties of engineering materials.

  • Engineering Global Challenge 1

    Develop and enhance a range of professional skills as a basis for professional registration as an Incorporated or Chartered Engineer. You'll focus on areas such as team working, leadership, project planning, data collection, measurement, business skills, and self-reflection.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Physiological Measurement and Maths

    This module introduces you to physiological measurements in the context of medical engineering, including the devices used in clinical practice. In addition, you'll develop understanding of more advanced mathematical techniques needed to solve engineering problems, including techniques for the modelling and control of dynamical systems.

  • Mechanical Engineering Design

    Gain hands-on experience producing a full design solution to solve a problem based on a loosely-defined customer requirement. This involves following the product design process from specification writing through to detailed design.

  • NHS Medical Engineering in Practice and Stress Analysis

    Gain first-hand experience of medical engineering in the healthcare setting by spending time in a number of different departments in local NHS hospitals. You'll then learn how to undertake the stress analysis of mechanical and medical parts with simple geometries under practical loading conditions.

  • Mathematics and Fluid Mechanics for Mechanical Engineers

    Gain knowledge and hands-on experience of using a range of mathematical functions and techniques to solve engineering problems. At the same time, you'll learn the fundamental and engineering aspects of fluid mechanics and apply this knowledge to solve multivariable mathematics and fluid mechanics problems.

  • Materials and Manufacture

    Explore the reasons engineering structures can fail, sometimes unexpectedly, through fatigue and fast fracture, corrosion and creep (metallic and polymeric), as well as processes that can reduce such problems. Working within a small group in our mechanical workshop, you'll build a design produced by your group, supported by our technical staff.​

  • Engineering Global Challenge 2

    Develop and enhance a range of professional skills as a basis for professional registration as an Incorporated or Chartered Engineer. You'll focus on areas such as team working, leadership, project planning, data collection, measurement, business skills, and self-reflection.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Your final year allows you to put your knowledge into practice, undertaking a major medical engineering project. This involves working at a professional level, often in conjunction with clinicians from local hospitals or medical companies.

Core module

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Individual Project (Medical Engineering)

    Apply and extend your engineering knowledge and professional skills by working on a substantial individual project throughout the academic year, supported by an academic project supervisor. Activities include project management, research, engineering design, development, reporting and presentation.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Stress Analysis and Applications of Finite Element Analysis

    Develop your understanding of advanced theories and techniques relevant to the solution of complex stress-analysis problems. The theory and application of finite element analysis is also covered using industry-standard software.

  • Prosthetics, Orthotics and Assistive Technologies

    This module provides you with an understanding of modern prosthetics, orthotics, assistive devices and their application. You'll study the principles and biomechanics behind their design, and the processes and technology used to manufacture the devices.

  • Biomaterials and Orthopaedic Devices

    This module introduces you to the key structural biological materials in the human body and the biomedical materials currently available to the medical engineer for implantation in the body. The design and development processes of orthopaedic devices to replace or augment damaged or diseased body parts is also explored.

  • Artificial Organs and CADCAM for Medical Engineering

    Gain knowledge of modern devices for the replacement or augmentation of bodily functions and their application; the principles behind their design; and the processes and technology used to manufacture these devices. You'll use state-of-the-art integrated CADCAM systems that are key to the design and manufacture of medical devices.

"The course content looked interesting, especially having the opportunity to do actual work in the mechanical engineering workshop, and visiting NHS departments was the cherry on top"

Imogen Falconer

More about this course

Medical engineering is one of the fastest growing and most dynamic sectors of the economy. Our courses give you the skills to succeed in a global industry worth more than £300 billion. You'll study under hospital clinicians as well as professional and practising engineers.

  • We were named among the top four British universities in the learning resources category in the mechanical engineering subject area (National Student Survey 2018, HEIs), with a score of 93%.
  • Accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM).
  • Graduating from the course provides a direct pathway to becoming a Chartered Engineer – a benchmark in the profession
  • Engineering graduates have some of the best employment prospects and highest starting salaries of any degree discipline.

You'll learn in state-of-the-art facilities from experts who teach advanced ideas on the application of mechanical engineering for a range of medical purposes, encompassing industry-standard computer-based methods and experimental techniques.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

44%

15%

41%

Second year

33%

10%

57%

Final year

50%

14%

36%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

Ranked among the top 10 universities in the country for medical technology degrees by the 2017 Complete University Guide.

Experienced engineers and NHS clinicians from local hospitals teach on our programmes.

Our accredited courses give you the skills to succeed in a £150-billion global industry.

Boost your employability by spending a year applying what you’ve learned to real-life projects on an industrial placement.

Entry requirements

2019 Tariff points: 112 points. Points can be from any qualification on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from 

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications
  • Applicants should have an A level in Maths at Grade C or above, or alternative Level 3 qualification.

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

Alternative qualifications

  • IB Diploma: 28 including 5 in HL Maths
  • Access to HE Diploma: Pass Science or Engineering based HE Diploma with minimum of 45 credits at merit or higher, including 18 credits at merit in Maths.
  • BTEC L3 Extended Diploma: Engineering including merit in core and optional maths units.

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £16,600 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

Prospects for our graduates continue to be excellent, and many receive several firm offers of employment even before graduating. The medical engineering industry is currently worth around £150 billion worldwide and is still expanding rapidly, with many exciting and rewarding opportunities for suitably qualified engineers.

As an engineering graduate, your mathematical and problem-solving skills, ability to understand innovative concepts and experience of working in teams will be in demand in all areas of engineering, which is reflected in attractive starting salaries, which are second only to those for medicine and dentistry graduates.

Medical engineers are typically employed in companies working on the design, development and manufacture of medical devices; in company sales departments or as technical advisors for marketing departments; in hospitals working with clinical colleagues and providing non-clinical services; at academic or government research facilities; at government regulatory agencies; in patent offices; or as professional engineers not constrained by a single discipline.

Engineering graduates are particularly sought after by leading companies and many of our graduates find employment throughout Europe and in the USA, where financial reward and professional recognition for engineers is even higher than the UK. Many students continue to study for higher degrees at Masters or PhD level.