medical

Undergraduate Available in Clearing

BEng Mechanical and Medical Engineering

Gain the skills to save lives and succeed in a global industry worth more than £300 billion.

Key information

Study mode

Full-time

Course length

3 years

Entry requirements

N/A

See requirements

UCAS code

HB38

Choose an option

Start date

Course overview

Apply engineering principles and scientific methods to solve problems in medicine and healthcare in this programme which combines engineering, medicine and biology.

You'll learn from experts who teach advanced ideas on the application of mechanical engineering for a range of medical purposes, encompassing industry-standard computer-based methods and experimental techniques.

Medical engineering is one of the fastest growing and most dynamic sectors of the economy.

Apply now through clearing

01482 462236 Apply online

6 reasons to study Mechanical and Medical Engineering at Hull

  1. Accredited by three leading industry bodies#
  2. Direct pathway to becoming a Chartered Engineer
  3. Study under NHS clinicians as well as engineers
  4. Opt to spend a year in industry or studying abroad
  5. Carry out NHS innovation project in Masters year
  6. Study near top industry names like Smith & Nephew
Engineering council logo IMECHE Logo IET IPEM ULP Accreditation Logo

What you'll study

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

First year modules

  • Compulsory

    Mathematical Tools and Concepts

    This module delivers essential core mathematics knowledge, including polynomial functions, trigonometric functions, series, vectors, matrices and complex numbers. You'll be introduced to Mathworks' Matlab to solve mathematically described engineering problems as well as to present and process results from experiments and simulations.

    Fundamentals of Medical Engineering

    This module introduces you to key medical engineering concepts such as the principles of forces, moments, and basic stress analysis concepts. You'll explore materials that are commonly used in technological environments and explain their properties. Additionally, human anatomy and physiology is also explored.

    Introduction to Design and Mechanical Engineering Practice

    ​This module introduces you to the principles of mechanical engineering and gives you the opportunity to put them into practice. It covers the key topics of computer aided design (CAD), experimental work/laboratory exercises and manufacturing safety and processes.

    Mathematics and Engineering Thermodynamics

    Develop mathematical skills in calculus and explore fundamental concepts in engineering thermodynamics. Topics in mathematics include differentiation, integration and differential equations. This is complemented by topics in thermodynamics including the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, heat engine cycles and their applications.

    Mechanical Engineering Science

    This module builds on the fundamentals of statics, stress and materials. You'll analyse and determine equilibrium conditions and the state of stress for defined mechanical systems, as well as describing processing routes and factors that influence the properties of engineering materials.

    Engineering Global Challenge 1

    Develop and enhance a range of professional skills as a basis for professional registration as a Chartered Engineer. You'll focus on areas such as team working, leadership, project planning, data collection, measurement, business skills, and self-reflection.

Second year modules

  • Compulsory

    Physiological Measurement and Maths

    This module introduces you to physiological measurements in the context of medical engineering, including the devices used in clinical practice. In addition, you'll develop understanding of more advanced mathematical techniques needed to solve engineering problems, including techniques for the modelling and control of dynamical systems.

    Mechanical Engineering Design

    Gain hands-on experience producing a full design solution to solve a problem based on a loosely-defined customer requirement. This involves following the product design process from specification writing through to detailed design.

    NHS Medical Engineering in Practice and Stress Analysis

    Gain first-hand experience of medical engineering in the healthcare setting by spending time in a number of different departments in local NHS hospitals. You'll then learn how to undertake the stress analysis of mechanical and medical parts with simple geometries under practical loading conditions.

    Mathematics and Fluid Mechanics for Mechanical Engineers

    Gain knowledge and hands-on experience of using a range of mathematical functions and techniques to solve engineering problems. At the same time, you'll learn the fundamental and engineering aspects of fluid mechanics and apply this knowledge to solve multivariable mathematics and fluid mechanics problems.

    Materials and Manufacture

    Explore the reasons engineering structures can fail, sometimes unexpectedly, through fatigue and fast fracture, corrosion and creep (metallic and polymeric), as well as processes that can reduce such problems. Working within a small group in our mechanical workshop, you'll build a design produced by your group, supported by our technical staff.​

    Engineering Global Challenge 2

    Develop and enhance a range of professional skills as a basis for professional registration as a Chartered Engineer. You'll focus on areas such as team working, leadership, project planning, data collection, measurement, business skills, and self-reflection.

Year abroad modules

You will spend the third year studying in one of our partner institutions in Europe, Asia, North America or Australia, gaining invaluable new skills and life experiences. This will help you to distinguish yourself from other graduates when entering the jobs market.

Placement year modules

Your placement is your opportunity to get some real-world work experience under your belt.

Just like in the real world, you’ll be responsible for finding and applying for opportunities, with the added benefit of help and support from university services such as the Careers and Employability service based in Student Central.

Final year modules

Your final year allows you to put your knowledge into practice, undertaking a major medical engineering project. This involves working at a professional level, often in conjunction with clinicians from local hospitals or medical companies.

  • Core

    Individual Project (Mechanical Engineering)

    Apply and extend your engineering knowledge and professional skills by working on a substantial individual project throughout the academic year, supported by an academic project supervisor. Activities include project management, research, engineering design, development, reporting and presentation.

  • Compulsory

    Stress Analysis and Applications of Finite Element Analysis

    Develop your understanding of advanced theories and techniques relevant to the solution of complex stress-analysis problems. The theory and application of finite element analysis is also covered using industry-standard software.

    Prosthetics, Orthotics and Assistive Technologies

    This module provides you with an understanding of modern prosthetics, orthotics, assistive devices and their application. You'll study the principles and biomechanics behind their design, and the processes and technology used to manufacture the devices.

    Testing Biomaterials and Medical Devices and 3Rs (Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animal Experimentation)

    Examine ways for assessing the biological performance of novel biomaterials and medical devices, and the use of emerging techniques to reduce the number of animal experiments.

    Artificial Organs and CADCAM for Medical Engineering

    Gain knowledge of modern devices for the replacement or augmentation of bodily functions and their application; the principles behind their design; and the processes and technology used to manufacture these devices. You'll use state-of-the-art integrated CADCAM systems that are key to the design and manufacture of medical devices.

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

How you'll study

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Overall workload

360 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

840 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

44%
15%
41%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

504 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

696 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

33%
10%
57%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

1200 hours

Work placement Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Indicative assessment proportions

100%
  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

1200 hours

Work placement Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Indicative assessment proportions

100%
  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

300 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

900 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

50%
14%
36%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Imogen Falconer Medical and Biomedical Engineering

"The course content looked interesting, especially having the opportunity to do actual work in the mechanical engineering workshop, and visit NHS departments was the cherry on top."

Entry Requirements

Don't meet our requirements?

We offer a Foundation Year to boost your skills and knowledge – it’s a great way to make your way into higher education.

Switch to the foundation year

During Clearing we look at all of your qualifications and experience, not just your academic grades – you’re more than just letters on a page!

Some courses still do have requirements such as previous study in your subject area, or specific GCSE grades. Others have additional requirements such as an interview or a satisfactory DBS check.

Please call us now on 01482 462236 to find out if we have a course that’s suitable for you.

Don't meet our requirements?

We offer a Foundation Year to boost your skills and knowledge – it’s a great way to make your way into higher education.

Switch to the foundation year

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. See other English language proficiency qualifications accepted by this University.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Our teaching staff

Click and drag

Take a tour of the facilities

Take a 360-degree look at our FabLab with its CNC (Computer Numerical Control) 3D printers, laser scanners and cutters.

Fees & funding

Home / EU

£9,250 per year*

International

£16,600 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Attainment
Scholarship

If you achieve

112 UCAS tariff points

from three A levels or equivalent, you could receive a reward of

£1,200

Find out more

An affordable city for students

From bills, to meals, to pints – you’ll find that your money goes a lot further in Hull.

Your future prospects

  • Medical device design and manufacture
  • Biomedical research and development
  • Rehabilitation engineer
  • Clinical engineer
  • Hospital clinical engineer

Medical engineers pursue rewarding careers in industry, hospitals, research facilities and regulatory agencies.

Medical device companies. such as Smith & Nephew and Johnson & Johnson. employ graduates to design and deliver projects. Many of our students receive offers before they graduate.

Open Day at University of Hull

Ready to apply?

You can apply for this course through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

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This. Is. Hull.

A place where we stand up to kings, do deals with the world and take a wrecking ball to the slave trade. A place where culture stands out and the phone boxes are a different colour. A place where we're free-thinking, independent and proud of it.

#The Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM)