maths

Faculty of Science and Engineering

Mathematics

UndergraduateBSc (Hons)

Year of entry:
UCAS code: G100

What you'll study

Gain an understanding of pure and applied mathematics on this accredited course. You'll also get a grounding in probability, statistics, and numerical programming.​

Besides the three-year option, there are more specialised versions of this course.

  • You can add a year’s work placement
  • A foundation year boosts your skills and knowledge if you don't quite meet our academic entry requirements

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Introduction to University Mathematics

    You will study logic, sets and rigorous proofs, which are fundamental to university mathematics. You will also learn to solve mathematics problems on the computer using MATLAB, and to produce professional mathematical reports in LaTeX.

  • Numbers, Sequences and Series

    This module formally introduces the basic number systems used in mathematics and introduces the notion of limits. You will also learn how to evaluate limits of sequences and series and how to determine whether they converge.

  • Calculus

    This module delivers essential core mathematics. You will study, for a function of a single real variable, the limit processes of differentiation and integration, using logic and the language of set theory.

  • Vector and Linear Algebra

    This module delivers essential core mathematics. You’ll explore the following themes: vectors, matrices, vector spaces, linear equation systems, and dimension.

  • Introduction to Probability and Statistics

    This module introduces the basic concepts of probability and statistics. You will learn how to use basic results from probability theory, standard probability distributions and how to statistically estimate and test hypotheses of model parameters.

  • Modelling and Mechanics

    See how mathematics in association with stated assumptions or physical laws can be used to model processes and predict potential outcomes. In particular, you will see how this applies to selected environmental issues and later to Newtonian mechanics and related topics from the physical world.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Analysis

    What exactly do we mean by saying that a function is continuous? smooth? differentiable? This module is about giving precise mathematical definitions to these and other statements about functions that we sometimes take for granted.

  • Linear Algebra and Groups

    This module delivers essential core mathematics. You’ll explore the following themes: abstract vector space theory, linear maps, inner product spaces, group theory, and operation preserving maps.

  • Differential Equations

    Explore various solution generating techniques including Wronskian procedures, Laplace transforms and the method of Frobenius, concluding with the more advanced application of Sturm-Liouville theory and a brief introduction to Fourier analysis.

  • Functions of a Complex Variable

    You will study differentiation and integration of a complex-valued function of a complex-valued variable. You'll investigate power series expansions about isolated singular points of otherwise analytic functions, with application to the evaluation of improper real integrals.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Functions of a Complex Variable

    You will study differentiation and integration of a complex-valued function of a complex-valued variable. You'll investigate power series expansions about isolated singular points of otherwise analytic functions, with application to the evaluation of improper real integrals.

  • Practical Programming with MATLAB

    This module begins by understanding how computers compute and process numbers, and the surprising limitations of numerical mathematics. There are weekly practical lab and coding assignments dealing with various mathematical tasks (e.g. numerical integration, and solving differential equations).

  • Statistical Inference and Methods

    This module expands on the first-year probability and statistics course by exploring hypothesis testing and its applications in a wide range of interesting statistical problems. 

  • Passport Languages

    The Passport Foreign Language Scheme provides you with the opportunity to develop your language skills. You can join a module to learn a new foreign language or to improve your existing language skills and intercultural competence. Languages include French, German, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Chinese, Japanese and Russian.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

The main focus in this phase of the course is your final-year project that will involve an in-depth study of a problem of your own choosing, drawn from the interests of a member of staff.

Core module

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Mathematical Project

    Under the supervision of your supervisor, you will perform an in-depth examination of a mathematical topic.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Numerical Analysis

    Many mathematical problems in the real world are too difficult to solve analytically to yield a nice closed solution (e.g. try solving x=sin x). Instead, you will see how the original mathematical problem can be approximated by a numerical approach and learn to analyse how close the resulting numerical solution approximates the (unknown) exact solution.

  • Differential Geometry

    Properties of curves and surfaces in 3D are studied using tools from Vector Calculus, Linear Algebra and Analysis. Some questions you will study include: How to make a map of the world? What is the Möbius strip? How curved is a sphere or a cube?

  • Game and Decision Theory

    This module introduces the basic notions from game theory and you will learn how to determine optimal strategies for non-cooperative and cooperative games. You will also learn how to make choices under uncertainty in the framework of decision theory.

  • Classical and Quantum Mechanics

    Explore the strange quantum world where the behaviour of subatomic particles is described by integrals, complex numbers, and the rules of probability.

  • Fluid Dynamics

    Using the techniques of vector calculus, you will derive the governing equations of a viscous, incompressible, Newtonian fluid. You will analyse the special case of an inviscid and irrotational fluid flow, before solving archetypical viscous fluid problems, for mainly planar or axial symmetric geometries.

  • Partial Differential Equations

    You will study methods for solving first- and second-order partial differential equations, mainly for scalar-valued functions of two (or more) variables. You will investigate existence and uniqueness and employ the methods of characteristics, separation of variables, Green's functions and integral theorems.

  • Statistical Models

    This module investigates non-parametrical tests, such as goodness-of-fit and rank tests. You will also learn how to use linear regression models and analysis of variance.

"There was a range of different modules you could choose. It was nicely split between the different types of Maths".

Katie Smith Watch video

More about this course

Gain an understanding of pure and applied maths on this rewarding degree. You'll study in small groups, as part of our close-knit mathematical community, under renowned researchers whose specialisms include algebra, geometry, fluid dynamics, astrophysics, probability and statistics.

  • A cash award worth up to £6,300 over three years for high-performing students.
  • This programme is accredited by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications.
  • A strong careers focus, including the option of an industrial placement.

Under expert guidance, you’ll work on projects that will push and develop your abilities in topics at the frontier of mathematics. Our degrees prepare you for your future career by encouraging conceptual and abstract thought.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

73%

27%

Second year

78%

22%

Final year

58%

9%

33%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

We scored a 90% satisfaction rating from our Mathematics students for the quality of learning resources here (National Student Survey 2018, HEIs)

Students with great A level (or equivalent) results qualify for the Gillian Stead Bursary worth up to £6,300 over three years.

Our BSc Mathematics degree is accredited by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications.

Mathematics at Hull is taught by renowned academics whose expertise underpins the modules you study.

Entry requirements

2019 Tariff points: 112 points. Points can be from any qualifications on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications 
  • Applicants should have an A level in Maths at Grade C or above.

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 28 points including 5 in HL Maths
  • BTEC L3 Extended Diploma:  suitable for Foundation Year only
  • Access to HE Diploma: Suitable for Foundation Year only.

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £14,000 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

A degree in Mathematics from the University of Hull will open up opportunities across a wide range of careers including teaching, finance, engineering and many more. Our MMath programme in particular, provides a solid foundation for those intending to pursue a PhD or a career in academic research. It is estimated that over 70% of jobs today require mathematics of some description according to a survey by Deloitte, therefore a degree in Mathematics is highly valued and regarded by prospective employers.

You’ll develop a range of transferable skills including data analysis, problem solving, presentation and communication.

The University's Careers Service works alongside departments to enhance your career prospects, organising activities such as CV writing, mock interviews, training for assessment centres and a series of career talks from employers and ex-students. They will be pleased to meet with you at any stage of your degree, and even after graduation - The University of Hull is one of the few universities which do not place a time limit after which support is withdrawn.