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Faculty of Arts, Cultures and Education

History with a Modern Language

UndergraduateBA (Hons)

Year of entry:
UCAS code: V1R8

What you'll study

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

In your first year, you’ll take one core module in History and two modules in your chosen language. You’ll follow either the beginners and improvers, or the advanced pathway, depending on your fluency in your chosen language.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Chinese / French / German / Italian / Spanish Language 1

    In each year, you’ll undertake two core language modules in each of your chosen languages, at either beginners and improvers or advanced level. Beginners and improvers level is for those without an A Level in languages and you'll start from scratch in a new language - where the emphasis is on key structures and intensive practice. If you have an A Level, you'll study at advanced level and begin to move confidently as you attain real-world language skills and explore various ways to apply these. 

  • Chinese / French / German / Italian / Spanish Language 2

    At beginners and improvers level; still working with native speakers, experienced teachers and language experts, you’ll already be able to look back and see a steady climb as you gain in confidence and proficiency, with more of our dedicated interaction and feedback. At advanced level you'll build on the ground acquired in trimester 1 to apply your practical language skills in a range of contexts. 

You'll also choose one from

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Exploring the Past

    The discipline of history encompasses an almost limitless variety of subjects and approaches. This module introduces you to some of the key areas, moving at a fast pace through seven historical themes.

  • Representing the Past in Film

    What can we learn about the past by studying films that represent it? We examine the aims and nature of history (both 'academic' and 'popular') by using Hollywood, European and British independent films to analyse key historical issues and to investigate the differences between history and biography. This is not a film studies module: film is a prism that we use to help you develop a sophisticated, self-aware approach to history.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Classical Civilisation

    This module explores key cities in the Graeco-Roman world that shape our understanding of 'Classical Civilisation'. From Minoan Knossos and Troy to Athens, Sparta, Rome, Pompeii and Istanbul, we use visual and material culture to examine what we actually know about living, believing and fighting in the ancient world.

  • Heritage and Modern War

    This innovative module explores the different methods used by public historians and heritage bodies to present the history of warfare during the 19th and 20th centuries.

  • The Archaeology of Britain

    Study the development of the British Isles – from the appearance of early humans to the end of the Middle Ages, viewing the key sites and finds that define each step along the way.

  • The Medieval World

    Between the 11th and 13th centuries, Europe experienced a transformation so revolutionary and profound that historians now refer to it as 'the making of Europe'. This module introduces the period which was so central to European history and culture.

  • Early Modern People and Their Worlds

    This module introduces the different ways that historians have sought to explain historical change in Europe – and Europe’s changing place in the world – from the late Middle Ages to the dawn of the modern era. It investigates a distinctive, exciting period of history which has done much to shape the world of today.

  • The Modern World

    The French Revolution of 1789 was arguably the political ‘big bang’ which created the modern world. You'll explore its legacy, as well as that of the Russian Revolution of 1917: an event which defined the 20th century in much the same way as the French Revolution shaped the 19th. 

  • Global Histories: the Non-Western World, 1500–Present

    Our histories are Euro-centric: they interpret events from a western perspective. But even though Europe became the world's primary arbiter between the 18th and 20th centuries, history is poly-centric – with many hubs of civilization, culture, trade and influence. This module presents a more balanced view of the world after 1492, when it's possible for the first time to speak of a true global history.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Thinking About the Past

    This module focuses on historiography: the history of history. It deals with how the subject of history and historical writing have evolved from ancient times to the present day.

  • Communicating the Past: The Virtual Historian

    This module trains you as an apprentice ‘virtual’ historian, giving you the skills to undertake your own original research. But ‘virtual’ has a dual meaning here: you'll explore the availability of sources online and present a source in a context suited for the public by designing an illustrated blog post.

  • Chinese / French / German / Italian / Spanish Language 3

    With more intensive practice, group work, grammar revision, and the development of core skills such as translation, you’ll work with your teachers to ensure you’re reaching a professionally recognised standard, no matter at what level you began your studies.

  • Chinese / French / German / Italian / Spanish Language 4

    Here the practice continues in each language area with intensified emphasis on idiomatic, colloquial and formal registers in different social and cultural contexts. There is also a distinct emphasis on preparation for your time abroad in the countries of your target language(s).

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Into the Wild: US Environmental History from the 19th Century to the Present

    An up-to-the-minute exploration of American environmental history and current approaches to the global climate change crisis. Named 'Best Module' in the 2017 students' union Teaching Awards, which are voted for by our students.

  • British Identity

    'Britishness' is in crisis. Who are we? The answer has changed radically in the last 150 years. A great imperial nation? A union of Anglo-Saxons and Celts? A country of immigrants? Or the wartime saviour of Europe? Brexit has brought these issues into sharp focus. This module might provide some answers.

  • Emperors, Vikings and Scholars: the Transformation of 'Barbarian' Europe, 750–1000

    The fall of the Roman Empire changed the cultural and political landscape of the West forever. In a region that was once only part of a civilisation straddling three continents arose a new political and cultural phenomenon: Europe. This module begins with the Carolingian empire and moves to the dramatic events of the Viking Age, which engulfed the continent between the eighth and tenth centuries.

  • Cities of Culture

    Rome, Amsterdam, St Petersburg, London, Paris, Vienna, Berlin and New York. Not a list of holiday destinations, but cities at their key cultural moments from the 17th to the 20th centuries. We'll examine the visual culture of these cities in relation to their social, economic and political life.

  • Landscapes: Archaeological and Historical Approaches

    Whether for survival, power and domination or a more spiritual connection, people in the past engaged with the world around them in different ways. This module investigates the ways that historians and archaeologists explore how and why people used to interact with their landscape in the manner that they did.

  • A Millennium of Persecution: Jews and Antisemitism in Europe, c.1000-1945

    This module offers a history of the persecution of European Jewry from the medieval to the modern eras. You'll explore an array of local sources – from the medieval archaeology of York and Lincoln to the archives of first-hand Holocaust testimonies held in our Wilberforce Institute here in Hull.

  • Power and Dominion: Expanding Rule in the Atlantic World, 1066-1865

  • “Ninety Per Cent of Everything”: Shipping and Society since 1650

    In noting that "ninety per cent of everything" transported in the world travels by sea, Rose George contends that "freight shipping has been no less revolutionary than the printing press or the internet, yet it is all but invisible". This module illuminates significant interactions between humanity and the world's oceans. It explores themes such as material and human cargoes, people and places, and control over sea space.

  • Enlightenment, Reform and Revolution

    The 18th century as the period of the Enlightenment and the "age of revolutions" has often been considered the beginning of the "modern world". This module explores key concepts of the political, social and intellectual history of Europe between the "Glorious Revolution" and the fall of Napoleon.

  • America's Wars in Asia

    The USA fought four major wars in Eastern Asia during the twentieth century: the Philippine-American War 1899-1902, the Pacific War 1941-45, the Korean War 1950-53 and the Vietnam War 1965-72. More recently, it has become involved in military ventures in Kuwait, Afghanistan and Iraq.

    This module looks back over the troubled relationship between Asia and the USA from the perspective of the key concepts that have influenced US foreign policy in the 20th century.

  • Game of History

    Millions of people play games, in all of their forms, and many of them are played out in historical settings. Study this module to explore how games shape our understanding of the past, and how history shapes games.

  • Imperialism, Nationalism, and Decolonization: Britain in SE Asia, c. 1850-1950

    This module examines the development of British intellectual, economic, and political interests in South-East Asia from the mid 19th to the mid 20th century. The themes and topics will be grouped under two principal heads: 'imperial expansion and colonial rule' and 'Asian nationalism and imperial contraction'.

  • East and West Germany from 'Zero Hour' to Reunification

    Study the diverging yet interlinked political histories of the two parts of Germany between 1945 and 1990. The reasons for the division of the country into the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the German Democratic Republic (GDR) in 1949 will be examined, and special emphasis will be placed on key turning points and how reunification came about in 1990.

  • The Normans in Europe: War, Power, Identity and Culture

    This module traces the Normans’ evolution from a band of Viking raiders, through their consolidation of lordship in northern France, to their conquests in Britain, Southern Italy and the Holy Land. Along the way, we will explore the Normans’ origin myths and constructed identity, their methods of conquest and rule, their dealings with the church at home and on crusade, and the art, literature and social structures created amidst the interplay of cultures along the Norman frontiers of Europe.

  • The British Empire

    The Victorian and Edwardian period is often described as an 'Age of Imperialism'. Yet what, exactly, does this description imply? Was British imperial expansion a symptom of aggressive self-confidence or of defensive uncertainty? Was the British Empire a 'cost' or a 'benefit' to Britain, and to Britain's dependencies? Did the First World War strengthen or weaken the British Empire?

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Dissertation

    You will make an original contribution to research by designing, carrying out and writing up your own project on a topic you choose, supported by your dissertation supervisor.

  • Special Subject (History)

    The History Special Subject provides an opportunity for you to work closely with a tutor across the year, on a topic relating to your expertise in research and scholarship. Topics vary each year but have included the reign of King John, Family, Law and Society in Early Modern England, the First World War, and History and Hazards.

  • Chinese / French / German / Italian / Spanish Language 5

    Back from the country or countries of your target language(s), the focus here is the consolidation of structures and grammar, as well as the serious development of skills in areas like translation, interpreting, textual exegesis, or subtitling.

  • Chinese / French / German / Italian / Spanish Language 6

    Building on all your work and experience to date, we’ll help to set you on your way to fluent professional and social use of your target language(s). This final module will help you become a career-ready global citizen, able to interact in diverse contexts and on multiple platforms.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Family, Law and Society in Early Modern England

    This module is rich with stories of people’s emotional lives in England between 1550 and 1750. We'll use diaries, correspondence and court records to delve into conflicts (between single people, married couples and within families) over everything from slander to money and property.

  • A Racial History of Modern Britain, 1793-1999

    From the Napoleonic Wars to Brexit, a constant flow of migrants to our shores has shaped Britain. Through seminars, lectures and a field trip to Hull's historic docklands, this module reveals the documentary legacy of successive patterns of prejudice.

  • The Third Reich, 1933-1945

    This module explores the domestic and foreign policies of Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1945. It seeks to explain how and why one of the most cultured nations on Earth – this ‘land of poets and thinkers’ – descended to such depths of barbarity within a few short years.

  • The Anglo-American ‘special relationship’ and the Middle East, 1945-1973

    The module examines Anglo-American relations in the Middle East from the end of World War Two to the Yom Kippur War. The Middle East has been one the world's most unstable and conflict-ridden territories since 1945. It's an ideal test case for examining the dynamics of the ‘special relationship’ – not least because Britain and the United States both had strong, identifiable interests in the region.

  • Crisis and Conflict After the Cold War: Interpreting the Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s

    The Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s destroyed a country of 20 million people. They shattered dreams of a peaceful utopia after the Cold War. And they gave rise to ideas about the 'clash of civilisations' which live on today. By studying controversies about the causes and course of the wars and their international context, you'll investigate how we make sense of the break-up of Yugoslavia and the legacies of the conflict.

  • Hazards and History: Disasters, Wars and Societies

    Disasters and wars are usually only seen as events that cause death and destruction and there is little attempt at theorising them in an historical context as significant causal factors in the shaping of human societies. In this module you'll study how disasters are never really “natural” but are the outcome of interplay between physical hazards and vulnerable human populations.

  • Field, Village, Castle: Medieval Landscapes

    The castle was the medieval powerhouse – it displayed military and political might, subdued populations and represented the attainment of power and status. At the other extreme, the majority of the population occupied a landscape dominated by the field and village. You'll examine the changing fortunes of people across the British Isles from 1000-1500.

  • Visual Culture in France in the 19th Century: Revolution and Representations of Power, Places and People

    You will use visual images to understand key historical shifts in power, politics and culture in France in this most revolutionary of centuries and analyse how images can support and contest the political and social status quo. From images of revolution and regime change, to propaganda campaigns and subversive counter-cultural attacks on French emperors and monarchs, you'll track personality politics, the growth of the middle classes and concurrent challenges to academic notions of art.

  • Edward I and the Origins of English Imperialism

    This module explores a pivotal period in British history, in which King Edward I forged a medieval British ‘empire’ by the strength of his will, the power of ideology, and the creation of the English military machine which would go on to devastate France in his grandson’s reign. Through the close reading of relevant primary sources, you'll consider concepts of race, otherness and empire, and how these were applied in the context of the medieval British Isles.

  • Imperial Colonies: Reinterpreting the American Revolution

    This module looks at the real story of the American Revolution and dispels the myth that it was fought by American ‘patriots’ against the tyranny of George III. You'll discover how the real imperial powers in America were the colonies themselves, which were always largely independent from Britain, and how the conflict of the 1770s was about maintaining that independence, by transforming colonies into states.

  • Commanding the Oceans: Seapower and British Ascendancy, 1688-1815

    You will study the maritime dimensions of Britain's economic, imperial and military ascendancy. You'll consider seapower in its broadest sense, starting from the assumption that the 'wooden world' of the Navy and the wider world interacted closely at almost every point.

  • Monks, Heretics and Reformers: The Religious Revolution of the Central Middle Ages

    You will study the resurgence of popular heresy from the 11th century to the early 13th century, and the monastic reforms and new monastic orders which transformed religious life in the same period. These were part of a wider culture of reform which embraced the Church and the laity, and which have been seen by historians as comprising a ‘religious movement’ which utterly transformed the nature of religion, belief and political authority in Europe.

  • Luther and his Legacy

    This module examines the historical legacy of one of the most important figures in world history. You'll focus on Luther's impact on aspects of German history (including its cultural and political unity since the Reformation, the notion of a Sonderweg, nationalism, and Nazi antisemitism) and his role as the founder of a Christian church with a global reach.

  • The Parisi

    According to an ancient writer, the Parisi occupied Roman eastern Yorkshire. Our region contains spectacular Iron Age archaeology: burials with chariots, hoards of gold coins, a major iron industry and hundreds of settlements including forts, towns and villas with mosaics. Featuring visits to Hull Museums, this module provides hands-on opportunities to explore this ancient people.

  • Medieval Popular Culture Then and Now

    Discover the lives of medieval people and medieval popular culture in England in the period c. 1350-1500. You'll gain an understanding of the conditions that culminated in the revolts and rebellions of the late 14th century. Along the way, we will look at modern popular representations of the late medieval era (e.g. Monty Python’s Holy Grail and Terry Jones’s Medieval Lives) to examine the emphases given to representations of the medieval intended for popular consumption.

  • Britain and the Slave Trade

    The African slave trade has shaped fundamentally the modern Atlantic world. Explore the history of British involvement in it, and the process by which the trade was abolished in 1807.

  • A Continent of Kings and Queens: Courtly Politics in Early Modern Europe

    You will be introduced to important themes in the history of monarchy, courts and ceremonies, which will reflect the variety and breadth of court studies. In particular, this module highlights the role of courts as prime sites of patronage and 'policy-making' and the role of ceremonies as a key feature of early modern politics.

"I love the variety of options which I have. Being able to study a particular area of history which I enjoy is so rewarding."

Emily Birch

“I found that Hull really offered a wide variety of different languages, so I thought it’d be perfect for what I wanted to do.”

Isabel Jezierska Watch Video

“Out of all of the universities I looked at, none of them had anything that compared to the facilities that Hull offered.”

Chloe Hammond Watch Video

More about this course

Variety is at the heart of our vision of history here at Hull. Historians are just as likely nowadays to study how people lived and loved in times gone by as they are to probe the stories of rulers and battles. At Hull, we recognise history in all of its diversity. You can follow your interests to study social, cultural, art, global, indigenous, military, maritime and economic history. Combine this with the opportunity to learn another language and you’ll gain high level historical and communication skills to give you a competitive edge in the job market.

For a Modern Language, you can study Chinese, French, German, Italian or Spanish. Hull offers excellent language learning facilities, with a dedicated space for languages students. Our dedicated team of advisors offer one-to-one support and a partnership scheme to practise your chosen language with native speakers. In History, you’ll have access to a wealth of resources, both online and in the magnificently refurbished University Library. Specialist study resources are also available at Hull History Centre, the Maritime Historical Studies Centre and the Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation (WISE).

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

8%

11%

81%

Second year

37%

9%

54%

Final year

13%

11%

76%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

Follow your interests in the social, cultural, art, indigenous, military, maritime and economic history of Britain, Europe and the wider world.

Resources include one of the UK's best university libraries, plus the Hull History Centre, Maritime Historical Studies Centre and the Wilberforce Institute.

One-to-one support from our team of language learning advisors in the Shoosmith Language Learning Centre which is open 24/7.

Find out more about our facilities

Five times Hull's history has shaped the world.

Take a look

Entry requirements

2019 Tariff points: 112 points. Points can be from any qualification on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from 

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

  • Applicants should have a GCSE in a foreign language at Grade C or above.

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 28 points
  • Access to HE Diploma: Pass with 45 credits at merit

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £14,000 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

Hull has a distinguished track record in the area of graduate employability. Employers value the skills that students acquire through studying History. Our degree programme will enhance your abilities to analyse complex data and present clear and coherent arguments in essays, presentations and classroom discussions. These skills are readily transferable to most areas of work.

Our graduates have used their historical knowledge to develop careers as academic librarians, archivists, heritage managers, museum/gallery conservators, records managers and information officers. Others have found success in sectors as diverse as accountancy, auditing, television and radio, journalism, local government, publishing, marketing, finance and banking.

Many graduates have elected to continue their studies by taking a Masters degree in History, a Postgraduate Certificate in Education or a vocational training course in areas like Museum Studies, Librarianship, Heritage Studies and Archive Management.

As a Hull graduate, you will continue to have access to the University Careers Service, which provides a wealth of advice and information on the world of work, as well as maintaining close links with local, regional, national and international graduate employers.