english

Faculty of Arts, Cultures and Education

English and Film Studies

UndergraduateBA (Hons)

Year of entry:
UCAS code: QP33

What you'll study

Explore, study and analyse English literature and global film. Along the way, you'll benefit from the knowledge of visiting authors and expert lecturers.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Literature Lab

    In this practical module, you'll acquire essential skills for the study of literature, as well as general academic skills. In a relaxed workshop environment, you'll practise close reading of poetry, fiction and drama for example. You'll also develop your skills in essay writing, presenting, academic research and referencing.

  • Literature in a Digital Age

    You will explore literature that engages with the modern world of technology and the internet, from cyberpunk through fantasy to science fiction. Issues include the impact of digital design, audio visual media and gaming on modern writers and their techniques. You'll also pay attention to how these techniques work in practical terms.

  • History of Hollywood Cinema

    ​In this module, you will explore the history of Hollywood cinema. It will be examined within the context of US social, cultural, and political history.​

  • Writing Criticism

    Sharpen your film analysis skills. You'll closely examine a range of different types of cinema and complete a series of written exercises that will help you become a better film critic.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Reading Fiction

    This module explores the techniques, conventions and developments of the novel from the 18th century to the present day. You'll engage with relevant social, historical and political contexts and focus particularly on authors ranging from Austen to Ondaatje.

  • Approaches to Poetry

    This module introduces you to different forms of poetry from the Renaissance to the present day, via a combination of lectures, workshops and seminars.

  • Drama and Performance

    You'll be introduced to a range of plays, ancient and modern, each of which is a theatrical and cultural landmark. Often a provocative one. The selected plays helped shape not only theatrical practice but also our understanding of what it is to be human, both now and in the past.

  • Travels in Text and Time

    Time-travelling across three centuries of English literature, this module introduces you to key English writers and works, from Chaucer’s The Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale, and the late medieval play, Everyman, to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Milton’s Paradise Lost. Breaking down barriers between Medieval and Renaissance literature, it groups texts according to theme and explores how these themes develop in plays and poems written centuries apart.

  • American Film and Society

    You will explore the relationship between Hollywood cinema and American society from the 1930s to the present day, considering how films of different genres and periods have tackled themes such as race, gender, sexuality, class and disability.

  • The Craft of Filmmaking

    Gain insight into the practical and collaborative elements of filmmaking. This module will introduce you to direction, cinematography, production management, editing and audio, with opportunities for practical application and critical reflection.

  • Screen, Nation, Identity

    Explore the relationship between a nation's sense of history and identity, and the stories that it tells about itself on screen.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • The Art of Storytelling

    Learn how film stories are put together, and how to take them apart. You'll explore topics including exposition, closure, suspense and temporal ordering in a module designed to refine your appreciation of the structure of screen narratives.

  • Dissertation / Screen Production Project

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Shakespeare and Early Modern Drama

    This module returns Shakespeare to the vibrant theatrical milieu of late 16th and early 17th-century London, where we encounter him as one among a number of inventive and influential playwrights of the time. It introduces groundbreaking plays of exceptional emotional reach and imaginative daring, written in a range of popular genres during a golden age of English theatre.

  • The Age of Chivalry and Romance

    You'll learn about, and evaluate, the courtly medieval culture of chivalry and courtly love, then see how it was received in the 'real' world of later medieval England. Our guides for this are Sir Thomas Malory's Arthurian epic Morte Darthur and Geoffrey Chaucer's less respectful The Canterbury Tales.

  • Sentiment and Scandal: Literature of the Long 18th Century

    Explore sentiment and satire, sensibility and scandal in a module which focuses upon the diversity, innovations and influence of 18th-century poetry, drama and fiction.

  • Visionaries and Rebels: Romantic Poets from Blake to Tennyson

    You will study Romanticism, a movement which gave birth to some of the greatest poetry in the English language. You'll be introduced to the different genres of Romantic poetry while learning about the political and philosophical background from which the poetry emerged.

  • Brief Encounters with the Victorians

    This module examines shorter narratives of the Victorian period, written by some of the most influential authors of the 19th century. It also addresses key issues of the period relating to industrialisation, class, gender and imperialism.

  • Voyage Out: Travel, Empire and Cultural Encounters

    You'll examine cultural encounters between travellers and the cultures they visit through a study of the literature of travel, including fictional accounts and visual representations, including such as art and film.

  • The Child in British and American Literature and Culture

    Develop insights into the ways in which the contradictory image of the child has been represented in literary texts in Britain and America from the 19th century through to the present day.

  • American Rebels: Reading 20th-Century US Counterculture

    You'll study the literature of US counterculture, centred around the social upheavals of the late 20th century. You'll read authors who cast off expectations of class, race, gender and literary form. And you'll explore the ways that they rebelled against their society through writing.

  • American Gothic

    You will immerse yourself in the darker side of American literature, examining the presence of a Gothic sensibility from the fiery preaching of the early Puritans to contemporary horror novels. You'll study a wide range of popular and literary fiction, exploring the terrors of haunted houses, alien monstrosities and insane protagonists in the specific American contexts in which they were produced.

  • Creative Enterprises

  • Written on the Body: Rethinking Gender and Sexuality

    This module takes a fresh look at contemporary human relations with a focus on sexuality, gender and the body. You'll study novels, poetry and films dealing with abuse and enslavement (Beloved, and The Handmaid’s Tale), new masculinities (High Fidelity and Locke), lesbian and gay writing (Fun Home and Thom Gunn’s poetry), religion and the effect on the body (Minaret), as well as trans and intersex identities (Middlesex and The Passion of New Eve).

  • Screening Genders

    Critically examine the representation of gender on screen through the lens of feminist film theory.

  • American Alternative Cinema

    Go beyond the Hollywood mainstream with case studies including independent, cult, exploitation, trash and underground cinema.

  • US Cold War Culture: From Consensus to Dissent

    Understand how the Cold War shaped American culture, and how American Culture shaped the Cold War. You'll explore the impact of events such as the invention of the atomic bomb, McCarthyism and the Vietnam War on American film, media and society.

  • American Animation History

    In this module, you'll develop a deeper understanding of the history of American animation by taking an in-depth look at the genre.

  • Landmarks of World Cinema

    Examine different national cinemas and draw on the analysis of relevant historical, cultural, and socio-political contexts. You'll explore concepts including debates around defining world cinema; ideas of first, second and third cinema; global and trans-national cinema; the relationship between genre and world cinema; film movements; international stardom; and film distribution practices.

  • Representing Reality, Disclosing Truth and Capturing the Everyday

    You'll explore the huge range of different ways that film and television can represent reality and why, in an era of alternative facts and fake news, representing reality matters. As well as documentary film and television, this module will encompass realist drama, news, lifestyle television and more.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Dissertation / Project Preparation

  • Dissertation or Screen Production Project

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Playing God: Late Medieval Drama, from Page to Stage

    This module explores the vibrant drama of late medieval England, focusing on the street plays performed in cities like York and Chester, on morality plays performed indoors before paying audiences, and on political plays performed in the households of royalty and nobility. Alongside study of the text of each play, you'll have the opportunity to reimagine the plays in performance, using theatre workshops, field trips and play archives to bring the era's drama to life.

  • Authorship and Identity in Renaissance Literature

    You will study how English writers from the Renaissance period (1579 to 1645), both male and female, canonical and more obscure, deliberately fashion themselves as ‘authors’, in relation to previous writers and works from both Classical and Early Modern European literary traditions. The module will introduce you to important techniques such as imitation and translation, and will provide an overview of significant European writers and sources. It will then focus on the following English authors: Edmund Spenser, Samuel Daniel, Lady Mary Sidney Herbert, Aemilia Lanyer, Lady Mary Wroth, Elizabeth Carey, Ben Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, and John Milton.

  • Shakespearean Transformations

    You will explore how Shakespeare borrowed and adapted plays - now anonymous - which had entered the dramatic tradition. You will consider Shakespeare's plays from all genres in the light of theories of adaptation, imitation, conversion and originality.

  • Unruly Subjects and Renaissance Texts

    Our subject is unruliness - how it was defined, represented, attacked and, on occasion, defiantly celebrated in later 16th and early 17th-century English literature. The focus is on how writing, which was regarded with suspicion by the authorities, treats controversial issues of the day such as rebellion, sexual misconduct, cross-dressing and witchcraft and incorporates socially marginal figures whose irreducible and unruly humanity challenges us to reflect on their marginalisation and on those who are similarly marginalised in our times.

  • Writing the Revolution: Sex, Religion and Politics in the Literature of 17th-century England

    You will explore the literature of the mid-17th century in the context of the century's revolutionary turns and counter-turns: civil war, regicide, the establishment of a republic, favouring puritanism, and the Restoration of the monarchy. Among the writers studied will be John Milton, Andrew Marvell and the Restoration playwrights, George Etherege and Aphra Behn.

  • Gothic

    You will analyse the Gothic, from the conception of the genre in the 18th century to its manifestation in contemporary literature and film, focusing on the genre's convergence with contemporaneous social and cultural preoccupations.

  • Secrets and Lies: Victorian Decadence and Degeneration 1860-1901

    Explore the development of new forms of writing which focus on the darker alternative or hidden aspects of Victorian society, such as the new woman, the homosexual man, the foreigner, and the poor, in the context of degeneration theory.

  • Speaking Pictures: Literature and the Visual Arts

    You will explore the relationship between literature and the visual arts from the Renaissance to the present. You'll examine a wide range of literary texts alongside paintings, works of art criticism and theoretical writings.

  • Childhood Trauma and its Aftermath in Contemporary Fiction

    Explore ways in which contemporary novels and 'misery memoirs' present childhood trauma that impacts on adolescence and adulthood. You'll discuss a range of characters with post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of early bereavement or mistreatment in the domestic sphere, in conjunction with psychological and medical studies of child development.

  • Contemporary Fiction

    You will discover and analyse an exciting range of recently-published novels, considering their relationship with culture, society, history and politics. You'll discuss issues such as the challenge to realism; narrative invention and innovation; internationalism and globalisation; and the connection between literatures of the past and present.

  • Crossing the Line: Frontiers in the Literature of America

    Explore literary representations of border regions in the Americas. You'll examine how cultural exchange, interaction and migration have shaped the US, Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean by reading texts that cross lines between cultures and produce new ways of thinking about national identities.

  • Special Author: Shakespeare

    You will study plays from the whole range of Shakespeare's dramatic career, from the early 1590s to around 1610, with a selection of comedies, histories, tragedies and tragicomedies chosen for study each year.

  • East Asian Cinema

    Examine the dynamic and diverse film output of countries including China, South Korea and Japan, and reflect on film as a 'transnational' phenomenon.

  • Is Television History?

    Reflect on the ways in which television can both do history and be history, with case studies ranging from period dramas to historical documentaries.

  • Disney Studies

    An in-depth exploration of the history and impact of Disney's global entertainment empire.

  • Global Nightmares: Contemporary Horror Cinema From Around the World

    This module critically analyses the contemporary horror film in a variety of national contexts. You'll study horror cinema from countries as diverse as the US, Brazil, France, Australia and Iran, including the films It, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, [REC], and À l'intérieur/Inside.

  • Screen Production Project

  • American History by Hollywood

    From D W Griffith’s 1915 epic, The Birth of a Nation onwards, Hollywood filmmakers have drawn upon the history of the United States as a bountiful source of stories, characters and adventures. Exploring cinematic representations of events such as the American Revolution or the Civil Rights Movement, and figures from Abraham Lincoln to Jesse James, this module compares Hollywood’s version of history with what historical courses say ‘really’ happened in the past.

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More about this course

This combined degree adds depth to your study of English literature by teaching you how to critically approach film and television.

  • Our Larkin Centre for Poetry and Creative Writing attracts internationally renowned visiting authors, as well as new talent.
  • English is taught across a range of genres by published poets, novelists and biographers.
  • Film studies at Hull combines hands-on skills with thought-provoking theory
  • Enjoy facilities including Middleton Hall – a £9.5-million concert venue, cinema and theatre space – as well as extensive access to on-campus TV, film and digital media facilities.

You'll study English and wider Anglophone literatures from a range of genres and periods, from the medieval to the contemporary. You'll also learn how to assess film and television as art, history, culture, entertainment, and commerce. And you'll find opportunities to be part of the literary and creative scene at the university and beyond – contributing to Hull's legacy as UK City of Culture.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

5%

95%

Second year

16%

8%

76%

Final year

13%

5%

82%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

Study English in the city described as the most poetic in England, where Philip Larkin wrote most of his best work.

Gain a first-class grounding in literature, from the medieval era to the 21st century, under the guidance of world-leading experts.

Fantastic facilities include Middleton Hall, with its advanced cinema, as well as dedicated TV, film and digital media resources.

Benefit from our connections with regional film and media organisations, and gain invaluable work experience.

Entry requirements

2019 Tariff points: 112 points. Points can be from any qualifications on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications 

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 28 points.
  • Access to HE Diploma: pass with minimum of 45 credits at merit.

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £14,000 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

We maintain very close links with graduate employers on a local, regional, national and international level.

A number of our graduates have gone onto the traditional kinds of employment associated with arts students, such as journalism, teacher training and the public services. However, this joint degree enables students to enter careers within the film and television industry, while many others begin careers in commerce and industry.

Our graduates take a wide range of positions including public relations officer, secondary school teacher, retail store manager, employment agency consultant, quality assurance technician, pension adviser, and fundraising and appeals organiser.

Hull has long featured among the UK’s top universities for the employability of its graduates, with an excellent Careers Service available to all students during their time here and after graduation. There’s also the option of continuing your studies as a postgraduate, so you may be interested in what we offer at MA, MPhil and PhD levels.