mechanical
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Faculty of Science and Engineering

Electronic Engineering

With a Foundation Year

UndergraduateBEng

Year of entry:
UCAS code: H603

What you'll study

This accredited course equips you with the specialist knowledge and skills to open doors to rewarding engineering careers.

Besides the three-year option, there are more specialised versions of this course.

  • You can add a year’s work placement
  • You could study abroad for a year
  • Extend your study to Masters level with an extra year
  • A foundation year boosts your skills and knowledge if you don't quite meet our academic entry requirements

Foundation year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

The foundation year is made of modules designed to provide you with the scientific knowledge and study skills you will need to be successful in your degree studies. 

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Foundation Mathematics A

    You will study pure mathematics topics, including proof, algebra, trigonometry, differentiation, integration, exponentials, logarithms, sequences and series. The applied topic is probability and statistics.

  • Foundation Engineering

    This module has been designed to give you a foundation of the skills and knowledge needed to pursue an engineering degree. You will explore topics such as: energy, mechanics, matter and heat transfer, waves and vibrations, electricity and magnetism.​

  • Foundation Mathematics B

    This module extends the knowledge gained in the Foundation Mathematics A - pure mathematics topics. You will also study functions and vectors. The applied topic is mechanics.

  • Engineering Technology

    During this module, you'll explore the role of general engineering in modern society. Beginning with an historical perspective, progressing through basic design skills and knowledge of materials, toward an understanding of the enabling technologies underlying contemporary engineering practice. 

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Preparing for Learning in Higher Education

    This module is designed to give you the best possible start to your university studies, making sure you have all the essential skills you need to succeed. Through lectures and workshops we will teach you how to write in an academic style, how to find quality sources, how to reference work, culminating in writing up a mini-research project.

  • Group Challenge (Engineering and Technology)

    Address one of the 21 key global challenges in engineering set out by the United Nations. Work in teams to identify key stakeholders, end users and potential funding sources, as well as producing an engineering solution for topics such as clean water, reusable energy, access to medical treatment and cleaner cities.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Mathematical Tools and Concepts

    This module delivers essential core mathematics knowledge, including polynomial functions, trigonometric functions, series, vectors, matrices and complex numbers. You'll be introduced to Mathworks' Matlab to solve mathematically described engineering problems as well as to present and process results from experiments and simulations.

  • Fundamentals of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    ​This module provides the first introduction to key principles and concepts of electrical and electronic engineering. You will learn to solve practical electrical problems, analyse simple electrical circuits and use the fundamental principles of digital logic circuits.

  • Practical Skills for Electrical and Electronic Engineers

    ​Through this module, you will acquire hands-on experience of practical work within a laboratory environment. You will learn to design and simulate electric and electronic circuits, to analyse and present experimental results, and you will develop your core professional skills.

  • Mathematics, Programming and Digital Logic Design

    This module delivers essential core mathematics knowledge, including differentiation, integration and differential equations.You'll be introduced to techniques and tools for the design and simulation of sequential logic circuits together with programming in C. Skills which are needed to develop embedded computer system applications.

  • Electrical and Electronic Circuits and Devices

    Learn about the basic concepts of electronic and electrical circuit analysis techniques and apply these to a range of electronic devices and circuit configurations. You'll look at DC and AC circuits composed of passive and active components, culminating in the design, construction and evaluation of a two transistor amplifier circuit.

  • Engineering Global Challenge 1

    Develop and enhance a range of professional skills as a basis for professional registration as an Incorporated or Chartered Engineer. You'll focus on areas such as team working, leadership, project planning, data collection, measurement, business skills, and self-reflection.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Mathematics and Control for Engineers

    Develop more advanced mathematical techniques needed to solve a range of engineering problems. You'll focus on mathematical techniques used to model and control dynamical systems. You'll also be introduced to Laplace and Fourier transform techniques and how they may be applied to linear control systems.

  • Electrical and Electronic Systems 1

    This module covers a number of key areas in electrical and electronic engineering through lectures and laboratories. Topics include analogue circuit design; digital circuit and system design using a hardware description language (HDL); and electrical power networks and machines.

  • Devices, Optoelectronics and Analogue Communications

    ​This module covers intricate areas of electronic and optoelectronic devices and analogue communications. You will learn principles and operation of key semiconductor devices and explore analysis and evaluation of analogue communication systems. Transmission line concepts applicable to high frequency electronics will be also introduced.

  • Vector Mathematics and Digital Communications

    Develop core skills in engineering mathematics with a particular emphasis on vector mathematics and its application to engineering problems. Digital communications systems will be explored with an emphasis on digital modulation and spectrum usage. Information theory will also be introduced.

  • Electrical and Electronic Systems 2

    Develop your knowledge of key concepts in circuit theory, circuit simulation and analogue circuit design. You will practice the design, construction and simulation of analogue and digital circuits through a selection of laboratory exercises and a digital circuit design project.

  • Engineering Global Challenge 2

    Develop and enhance a range of professional skills as a basis for professional registration as an Incorporated or Chartered Engineer. You'll focus on areas such as team working, leadership, project planning, data collection, measurement, business skills, and self-reflection.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core module

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Individual Project (Electrical and Electronic Engineering)

    Apply and extend your engineering knowledge and professional skills by working on a substantial individual project throughout the academic year, supported by an academic project supervisor. Activities include project management, research, engineering design, development, reporting and presentation.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Embedded Systems

    Extend your understanding of the practical engineering issues raised by the design and programming of real-time, reactive, embedded and networked systems. You'll experience the challenge of designing, building and programming a large scale embedded system during a group-based laboratory exercise.

  • Control System Analysis and Advanced Electromagnetics

    The first part of this module is explores principles of feedback and automation -  essential for systems requiring the function of control, e.g. safe flight systems for aircraft. The second gives you an understanding of how electromagnetism underlies the function of radio systems, electrical machines and other systems where electricity and magnetism are important together.

  • Digital Signal Processing and Transmission

    Extend and develop an appreciation of the underlying concepts and theories of radio signal transmission and propagation and computer based signal processing and control. You'll learn through laboratory experiments to enable aspects of signal transmission and propagation and computer based signal processing to be experienced and measured.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Advanced Electronics and Optoelectronics

    ​This module addresses the design, characteristics and applications of advanced electronic and optoelectronic devices and control systems. You will explore how to select, design, interface and evaluate the devices and systems for modern engineering applications.

  • Control Systems and Instrumentation

    Develop an understanding of control, instrumentation and power electronic systems used in a range of industries. Learn about the techniques to select, design and evaluate systems for particular engineering applications.

"I came to an open day at the university of Hull and the atmosphere was so friendly in the department I was able to talk to the head of school and talk to other students, see the final year projects and it was just so enlightened and just so enthusiast as an environment."

Natasha Pitts

More about this course

Our Electronic Engineering degree gives you a strong foundation in the theory and practice of electronics. It equips you with the specialist knowledge, practical know-how and professional skills to open up opportunities to rewarding careers.

  • Our electrical and electronic engineering courses were the first in the UK to be accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET – formerly IEE).
  • Graduating from this course gives you a direct pathway to becoming a Chartered Engineer – a benchmark in the profession.
  • You use the latest equipment and techniques, guided by experts.
  • The EngineeringUK organisation highlighted a current annual shortfall of 55,000 skilled workers in the engineering sector in Britain.

The expertise you gain as an engineering student – mathematical abilities, problem-solving skills, ability to understand innovative concepts – is valued in all areas of the discipline. This is reflected in starting salaries and average earnings.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

Foundation year

38%

30%

32%

First year

33%

18%

49%

Second year

47%

15%

38%

Final year

38%

16%

46%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

Click map to view directions on Google Maps

Designed in collaboration with industry, our degrees aim to meet a strong and growing demand for talented engineers.

Studying in the Humber region - Britain's 'energy estuary' - creates a wealth of career and placement opportunities.

Electronic Engineering courses were the first in the UK (nearly 30 years ago) to gain Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) accreditation. All of our courses are fully accredited and are recognised qualifications towards Chartered Engineer status.

Our graduates enjoy excellent prospects, with many receiving job offers even before they graduate.

Entry requirements

Foundation Year entry requirements

  • The foundation year is designed for applicants whose qualifications and experience do not allow direct entry to the undergraduate degree.
  • We expect applicants to demonstrate an experience of a related subject and an aptitude for academic work which may be determined by an essay and/or interview alongside the application.
  • For applicants with A levels in subjects other than those key to the degree, we will usually require a minimum of 80 points from Level 3 qualifications.

Alternative qualifications

  • IB Diploma: 24 points
  • Pass the Access to HE Diploma

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £16,600 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

Career prospects for engineering graduates continue to be excellent; many receive several firm offers of employment even before graduating. A report from industry body EngineeringUK highlighted a current annual shortfall of 55,000 skilled workers within the engineering sector in Britain.

Engineering enterprises in the Humber region have an overall turnover of £61 billion and offer a range of challenging and rewarding positions for talented engineering graduates.

The region is rapidly emerging as Europe’s renewable energy capital – 'the energy estuary’ – with engineering giant Siemens and its partner Associated British Ports investing £310 million in a wind turbine production facility at Green Port Hull and Vivergo Fuels’ nearby plant set to become the country’s largest producer of bioethanol.

The skills you gain as an engineering student – your mathematical abilities, problem-solving abilities, understanding of innovative concepts and experience of working in teams – are much in demand in all areas of engineering. This is reflected positively in high starting salaries and average earnings.

You will also find that your engineering degree makes you highly sought-after by leading companies in the global marketplace: your engineering degree from Hull can therefore lead to a career anywhere in the world. Our graduates have gone on to work with companies such as Alstom, BAE Systems, Corus, GlaxoSmithKline, the armed forces and the Health and Safety Executive.

Alternatively, many students decide to stay in Hull to study for higher degrees at Masters and PhD level.