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Faculty of Business, Law and Politics

Economics

UndergraduateBSc (Hons)

Year of entry:
UCAS code: L100

What you'll study

Develop a deep understanding of economic issues and theories, studying under research-active experts in this field.

Besides the three-year option, there are more specialised versions of this course.

  • You can add a year’s work placement
  • You could study abroad for a year
  • A foundation year boosts your skills and knowledge if you don't quite meet our academic entry requirements

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Principles of Economics 1

    This module provides an introduction to economics for specialists and non-specialists alike. You'll explore both microeconomics (the affairs of consumers, firms and the government) and macroeconomics (the study of the economy as a whole).

  • Mathematics for Economics

    This module provides the mathematical tools for core modules in economics. Mathematical techniques are fundamental to investigating many economic problems. Using maths allows an economist to formalise and solve problems that can't be addressed in other ways.

  • Accounting and Finance

    This module delivers essential basic accounting and finance knowledge. You'll study topics including measuring financial performance; analysing and interpreting financial statements; capital investment appraisal decisions; financing decisions; working capital management; cost behaviour; cost-volume-profit analysis; absorption costing; variance analysis and budgeting.

  • Principles of Economics 2

    This module introduces some key ideas in economics. It will show you why economics is central to understanding the behaviour of individuals and businesses, and why governments intervene in markets.

  • Statistics for Economics

    This module provides a basic grounding in simple descriptive statistics and the use of graphs and charts. It also introduces several key concepts which will be necessary when studying models based on economic theory with real-life data. It involves the use of excel and you will be introduced to regression analysis.

  • World Economy

    This module provides an introduction to the world economy. You'll study the nature of, and change in, the world economy from an economic perspective complemented by a social, political and institutional understanding. You'll develop insights into key contemporary issues associated with international trade, international finance, regional groupings such as the European Community, climate change and others.

Lectures introduce concepts and analytical approaches. These are then revisited in more interactive tutorials and workshops. Guided independent learning, including e-learning, provides further support.

Assessment by exams encourages you to ‘think like an economist’: applying relevant forms of analysis (without reference to textbooks) under pressure. Assessment also includes in-class tests, essays, assignments and presentations.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Compulsory modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Intermediate Consumer Theory

    This module builds on the microeconomics studied at level 4. It provides a deeper insight into the nature of economic theorising, focusing in particular on the behaviour of individuals/households and decision making when the future is uncertain.

  • Intermediate Mathematical Economic Analysis

    Develop your understanding of the mathematical tools necessary to construct and solve economic models. In most economic models, the agents are assumed to maximize or minimize some objective function, and so the main focus is on formulating and solving optimisation problems.

  • Intermediate Macroeconomics

    This module is designed to provide you with a solid background in macroeconomic theory and policy-making, shedding light on the main models of Keynesian, new-Keynesian, classical and neoclassical schools. It looks into issues such as the business cycle; long-term economic growth; consumption behaviour; the role of expectations; inflation and unemployment; money and monetary policy.

  • Theory of the Firm and Welfare Economics

    This module builds on the microeconomics studied at level 4. It provides a deeper insight into the nature of economic theorising, focusing in particular on the behaviour of firms and the role government plays in market economies.

  • Introduction to Econometrics

    This module encompasses theoretical knowledge and practical application of econometric techniques. You'll develop an understanding of how to formulate and estimate econometric models for empirical analysis, and to interpret the results. Multiple least squares regression is the key approach, enabling models to be developed, tested and refined.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Development Economics

    The focus of this module is on developing countries and their opportunities for, and constraints to, economic development. You'll be introduced to the role of economics in understanding the nature and processes of economic development, and explore prominent contemporary economic issues faced by developing countries.

  • Summer School

    Broaden your experience in an international setting and study in one of our partner institutions for up to three weeks over the summer. This module can count towards your degree.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Advanced Microeconomics

  • Advanced Macroeconomics

    Explore macroeconomic theory at advanced undergraduate level. The emphasis is on learning theoretical growth models and analytical techniques as an aide to understanding contemporary macroeconomic issues.

  • Economics Dissertation

    Undertake a substantial piece of independent research. The dissertation aims to develop your abilities in research design, data collection and analysis, and critical interpretation, and apply these to the investigation of a particular problem or issue.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Econometrics

    You will develop knowledge and understanding of the statistical methods and techniques required for data analysis, interpretation and presentation of economic and financial data. This module covers binary and limited dependent variable models, instrumental variable regression models, time series analysis and forecasting, panel data and time varying coefficient models.

  • Labour Economics

    This module takes an analytical look at fundamental themes and issues in modern labour economics. Labour economics spans both microeconomics and macroeconomics, but you'll focus more on microeconomic issues (such as those addressed by the income-leisure model).

  • Financial Economics

    This module focuses on how the financial system is central to the smooth functioning of the economy. You’ll study the roles that financial intermediation, money and the financial markets play within the economic system.

  • Economics of Government

    In many countries, the state's share of spending is more than 30 per cent. This module explores how governments decides on their spending and how they raise the money to pay for it.

"New language skills, friends from every continent and incredible memories!"

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More about this course

BSc Economics provides a thorough grounding in economic principles and analysis. You can tailor the course to your own interests, and you'll study in a business school which has international accreditation from AACSB (held by fewer than 5% of business programmes worldwide).

  • Past graduates include Jeremy Darroch (Chief Executive of Sky) and Muhtar Kent (Chairman of Coca-Coca).
  • We have an established track record of graduates going on to work for the likes of JP Morgan, Rothschild, Rolls-Royce, the Home Office and BP.
  • Study under research-active academics with expertise in areas from labour economics and applied microeconomics to international economics and macroeconomics.

This course offers an attractive combination of skills that employers value. Your studies will range from individuals' and businesses' microeconomic choices to the large-scale decisions of government and supranational organisations.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

82%

8%

10%

Second year

71%

12%

17%

Final year

70%

5%

25%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

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Our graduates go on to successful careers with illustrious organisations such as J P Morgan, Rolls-Royce, The Home Office, Rothschild and BP.

With over 90 years of experience, Hull has a long-established reputation for Economics.

Learn with state-of-the-art business software in our inspiring Grade II listed buildings.

Find out more

Study abroad and gain valuable and life-enriching experience as part of your degree.

Find out more

Entry requirements

2019 Tariff points: 112 points. Points can be from any qualification on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from 

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications 

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

  • Applicants should have GCSE Maths at Grade 4 or C, or Level 2 Functional Skills in Maths

Alternative qualifications

  • IB Diploma: 28 points
  • Access to HE Diploma: pass with minimum of 15 credits at distinction and 15 credits at merit

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £14,000 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

This programme's focus is particularly suitable to academic scholarship. So a natural progression for our graduates will be towards further study on Masters and doctoral programmes.

Graduates will be well placed to enter the Government Economic Service, the UK's principal employer of economists. They will also be qualified for positions in economic consultancies or trade and representative bodies such as the CBI, as well as in industry and commerce.

However, most graduates are likely to gain employment in positions where their acquired knowledge is valuable, rather than essential. So all sectors of the economy are potentially available (including self employment).

Examples of firms which have taken on our graduates recently are BAE Systems, Npower, IBM, Hull Trains, RWE, Young’s Seafood, Deutsche Börse Group and Airbus. Other alumni have joined local authorities or have gone on to train as teachers.

Our dedicated Centre for Professional Success will connect you with businesses and keep you up to date with relevant work placements, company projects, job opportunities and skills to help give you the edge in the employment market.