Drama_and_Film_Studies

Undergraduate Available in Clearing

BA Drama and Film Studies

You'll gain hands-on experience and get access to a Grade II-listed theatre and state-of-the-art cinema facilities.

Key information

Study mode

Full-time

Course length

3 years

Entry requirements

N/A

See requirements

UCAS code

WP43

Choose an option

Start date

Course overview

By choosing Drama and Film Studies at Hull, you’ll gain unique experience and study in some of the best facilities in the country.

Here, you can develop your talents as a performer, critic, writer, technician or designer. Your learning combines practical and theoretical work. And our range of modules gives you the chance to design your course around your interests.

We also enjoy strong relationships with local arts organisations including Hull Truck Theatre and Opera North.

Apply now through clearing

01482 462236 Apply online

6 reasons to study Drama and Film at Hull

  1. 99 graduate employability rating*
  2. Exclusive access to a Grade II-listed theatre
  3. Access to TV, film and media facilities on campus
  4. Engage with leading names like Hull Truck Theatre
  5. Study with experts in genres from Disney to Horror
  6. Links to many local graduate theatre companies

What you'll study

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

First year modules

  • Compulsory

    Approaches to Theatre 1

    Looking at plays from different periods and historic cultures, you will explore theatre in discussions and performance workshops. This module will also introduce you to two modes of assessment: essay and presentation.

    Approaches to Theatre 2

    This module loosely follows on from Approaches to Theatre 1, exploring play texts theoretically and practically with a view to a particular theme. You'll get to know the other two modes of assessment used in drama: performance and portfolio.

    Safe Working Practices

    Develop competency in specialist areas of theatre production. You'll explore safe working practices and technical possibilities so you can get the most out of our performance spaces.

    The Craft of Filmmaking

    Gain insight into the practical and collaborative elements of filmmaking. This module will introduce you to direction, cinematography, production management, editing and audio, with opportunities for practical application and critical reflection.

    Introductory Performance Techniques

    Develop practical and theoretical skills in theatre making. You'll work with your peers to create short devised performances, responding to plays from classical, Renaissance and contemporary theatre.

    Writing Criticism

    Sharpen your film analysis skills. You'll closely examine a range of different types of cinema and complete a series of written exercises that will help you become a better film critic.

Second year modules

  • Compulsory

    Theatre Practice 1: Research and Development

    Working with a staff project leader, you'll develop your theatre-making skills through research and planning activities, devising exercises and practical workshops all related to a specific performance project.

    Theatre Practice 2: Production

    You will work with other students to create a performance based on the skills developed during Theatre Practice 1. You'll engage in a combination of staff-led and student-led workshops and rehearsals, leading to a practical performance outcome.

  • Optional

    Moving Image Techniques

    This module allows you to explore the medium of moving image while developing core technical competencies. Focusing more on experimentation and creativity than conventional narrative filmmaking, it covers areas such as music video and experimental filmmaking.

    Narration in the Fiction Film

    Examine in detail the storytelling possibilities of cinema, in a module that encompasses classical Hollywood cinema and alternative modes including art cinema, counter-cinema, and parametric narration.

    American Alternative Cinema

    Go beyond the Hollywood mainstream with case studies including independent, cult, exploitation, trash and underground cinema.

    Exploratory Practices 1

    This module focuses on the skills for developing a production, including textual and thematic context, practical methodology, creative concept, planning and time management.

    Intermediate Technique

    You will be encouraged to make connections and develop skills relating to the themes and specific production needs of the parallel core module, Theatre Practice 1. You'll develop your skills and understanding of one of the following key areas of production: scenography, including areas of technical specialism; stage management; play and scriptwriting; and acting and performance.

    Performance Perspectives 1: Making Meaning

    Consider how theatre communicates with audiences by constructing meaning. You’ll focus on making meaning in performance and how theatre practitioners construct meaning.

    Performance Perspectives 2: Contexts and Criticisms

    This module allows you to consider useful critical frameworks for understanding performance from a range of perspectives. You will have the opportunity to explore theatre historiography, cultural theory, socio-political analysis and aesthetics, and to discover how these ideas and others like them can develop our understanding of theatre practice and theory.

    Representing the Real, Disclosing the Truth, and Capturing the Everyday

    You'll explore the huge range of different ways that film and television can represent reality and why, in an era of alternative facts and fake news, representing reality matters. As well as documentary film and television, this module will encompass realist drama, news, lifestyle television and more.

    American Animation History

    In this module, you'll develop a deeper understanding of the history of American animation by taking an in-depth look at the genre.

    Television and Factual Production

    On this module, you'll produce factual content and works suitable for broadcast as part of a small production crew. Take the opportunity to develop your production skills and learn more about television and factual production.

Final year modules

  • Compulsory

    Specialist Project (Drama)

    Dissertation (Film)

    You will make an original contribution to research by designing, carrying out and writing up your own project on a topic you choose, supported by your dissertation supervisor.

  • Optional

    Making Performance 1: Research and Development

    Working in student-directed 'companies', you'll carry out independent research and dramaturgical development that works towards the performance of an original production in the following trimester. You'll be allocated a designated production role in the development of your specialism, as well as the initial stages of the production as a whole.

    East Asian Cinema

    Examine the dynamic and diverse film output of countries including China, South Korea and Japan, and reflect on film as a 'transnational' phenomenon.

    Is Television History?

    Reflect on the ways in which television can both do history and be history, with case studies ranging from period dramas to historical documentaries.

    Making Performance 2: Production

    Working in student-directed 'companies', you'll continue to work in your designated production area towards the performance realisation of the concept developed during trimester one. Your production work will be staged publicly as part of the annual 'Making Performance' season on campus.

    Screen Production Project 1: Planning and Pre-Production

    Turn your film idea into a workable and professional project before you step into production. Learn about what it takes to create a film before pitching your idea, ready for the next steps.

    Screen Production Project 2: Filming and Post-Production

    Create your film. Take the reins and follow the project through from pre-production to shooting, editing, screening and review.

    Disney Studies

    An in-depth exploration of the history and impact of Disney's global entertainment empire.

    Global Nightmares: Contemporary Horror Cinema From Around the World

    This module critically analyses the contemporary horror film in a variety of national contexts. You'll study horror cinema from countries as diverse as the US, Brazil, France, Australia and Iran, including the films It, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, [REC], and À l'intérieur/Inside.

    Exploratory Practices 2

    Through experimental practice, you’ll come to understand a range of range of styles and techniques connected to developing individual and collaborative theatre skills.

    Performance Perspectives 3: Approaching Audiences

    Consider how theatre of different eras, genres, locations and aesthetics has approached audiences, and how the relationship between audience and performance can function.

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

How you'll study

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Overall workload

264 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

936 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

40%
60%
  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

252 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

948 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

6%
31%
63%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

240 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

960 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

6%
26%
68%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Lauren Cloke Drama

"Hearing how passionate the lecturers were about helping you achieve your potential made me realise Hull was the place I wanted to do my degree."

Entry Requirements

During Clearing we look at all of your qualifications and experience, not just your academic grades – you’re more than just letters on a page!

Some courses still do have requirements such as previous study in your subject area, or specific GCSE grades. Others have additional requirements such as an interview or a satisfactory DBS check.

Please call us now on 01482 462236 to find out if we have a course that’s suitable for you.

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. See other English language proficiency qualifications accepted by this University.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Our teaching staff

Click and drag

Take a tour of the facilities

Drama and Film Studies students enjoy access to the Grade II-listed Gulbenkian Centre - your own working theatre.

Fees & funding

Home / EU

£9,250 per year*

International

£14,000 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Attainment
Scholarship

If you achieve

112 UCAS tariff points

from three A levels or equivalent, you could receive a reward of

£1,200

Find out more

An affordable city for students

From bills, to meals, to pints – you’ll find that your money goes a lot further in Hull.

Your future prospects

  • Actor
  • Director
  • Writer
  • Costume designer
  • Stage manager
  • Producer

A drama degree can open doors to a wide range of careers. Our graduates go on to work for world-renowned theatres and theatre companies.

Many others find success in creative industries such as journalism and education.

Open Day at University of Hull

Ready to apply?

You can apply for this course through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

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This. Is. Hull.

A place where we stand up to kings, do deals with the world and take a wrecking ball to the slave trade. A place where culture stands out and the phone boxes are a different colour. A place where we're free-thinking, independent and proud of it.

*99% of drama, music and screen students in work or further study within six months of graduating: UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey for the academic year 2016/17, published by HESA 2018