creative music technology

Undergraduate Available in Clearing

BA Creative Music Technology

Explore musical cultures and contexts. And hone technical skills in professional-standard facilities on our JAMES-accredited degree.

Key information

Study mode

Full-time

Course length

3 years

Entry requirements

N/A

See requirements

UCAS code

J931

Choose an option

Start date

Course overview

Masterclasses from industry specialists, technicians, producers and musicians will supplement lectures, seminars and workshops with our own expert staff.

Cutting-edge facilities – including our ambisonic studio, 20 iMac lab, and recording and mixing studios – are available to you 24/7.

You’ll graduate with a portfolio of work produced throughout your studies, including work experience and collaborations with professionals, along with a range of professional experience that prepares you for the next stage of your career.

Apply now through clearing

01482 462236 Apply online

6 reasons to study Creative Music Technology at Hull

  1. Accredited by the JAMES industry organisation
  2. 99% graduate employability rating*
  3. Work with top names like the BBC and Opera North
  4. 24-hour access to industry-standard studios
  5. Set up your own record label with expert support
  6. Play, jam and record with like-minded musicians
JAMES - Joint Audio Media Education Support

What you'll study

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

First year modules

Masterclasses from industry specialists, composers, producers and musicians supplement lectures, seminars and workshops. And there are extracurricular activities too. You can get involved in staff- and student-led ensembles, workshops, collaborative projects and productions.

  • Compulsory

    Creative Music Skills 1

    You'll develop a comprehensive range of general music-based skills relating to performance, technology, songwriting, electronic composition and digital audio. These are all explored in practical, creative ways through interactive seminars and workshops that provide the foundation for further studies.

    Music, Criticism and Culture

    You will study musical aesthetics across diverse genres, developing your critical skills and your ability to construct written arguments. Topics range from authenticity in cover songs to the political arguments of Adorno, Scruton and Cage.

    Studio Production 1

    This module focuses on an introduction to the practical and theoretical aspects of studio recording using both SSL AWS consoles and Avid Control surfaces. Theoretical and hands-on instruction using high quality studio equipment will give you the knowledge and confidence to operate a studio.

    Studio Production 2

    Furthering understanding developed in Studio Production 1, this module looks at the aesthetics and technicalities of studio-based music realisation. Get hands-on with different technical and stylistic approaches to production.

    Creative Music Skills 2

    You’ll continue to develop a comprehensive range of skills in performance, instrumental composition, music production, electronic composition and digital audio. This module is highly interactive and is taught via lectures, seminars and workshops that pave the way for your further studies.

    Popular Music in Context

    You will explore popular music before 1980 from structural, sociological and historical viewpoints. Topics include blues, the French chanson, protest music and theories of harmony in rock songs.

Second year modules

  • Compulsory

    Creative Studio Production

    You will focus on advanced music production techniques including surround sound recording and mixing. Assignments are practically based and revolve around the use of an SSL Duality 48 Channel Desk and an Avid S6.

    Acoustics and Studio Design

    This module is divided into two parts: studio design and an understanding of acoustics. You'll study the theoretical and practical application of acoustic formulae, speech perception, the fundamentals of music, research methods and design. The first assignment involves the design of a studio, and the second is a presentation on an agreed topic.

  • Optional

    The Materials of Composition

    Develop your own compositional approach. This module introduces you to key techniques for manipulating pitch, rhythm and timbre via the study of melody, harmonies, consonance, dissonance, clusters, pulses, meters, rhythms, form, structure, and instrumental effects.

    Electronic Composition

    This module focuses on the creation of live popular and experimental electronic and electroacoustic music and builds upon skills gained in the Creative Music Skills I and II: Electronic Composition strand. You'll be introduced to the advanced techniques involved in producing pieces in a stereo context.

    Performance 1

    This module will enable you to develop skills in music performance using your voice or a chosen instrument in popular, jazz or classical traditions. You can specialise in solo playing, small group playing in bands or chamber ensembles, accompaniment, conducting or directing.

    Performance 2

    This module will enable you to develop skills in music performance using your voice or a chosen instrument in popular, jazz or classical traditions. You can specialise in solo playing, small group playing in bands or chamber ensembles, accompaniment, conducting or directing.

    Rock and Popular Musicology

    In the first half of this module, you will explore current trends in popular musicology, including semiotics, gender, race, protest, poetics, the canon and theories of influence. In the second, you'll study some techniques of contemporary rock journalism.

    Film Music

    You will learn to think about, analyse and discuss how music shapes films and television shows. You do not need to have any knowledge of music to study this module, as it focuses on the interpretation and effects of music in cinematic and televisual contexts.

    Game Audio

    Explore aspects of sound design for games and discover some of the creative, technical and aesthetic challenges faced by sound designers working in this field. Develop insights into commercial industry practice and acquire vocational skills as you work with interactive audio and game middleware.

    Songwriting

    This practical module will hone your skills as a songwriter. You'll be expected to write one song per week to a given brief, and then produce an EP of original material. Peer critique is encouraged, and no genre is excluded.

    Audio-Visual Composition

    Create original audio-visual films, exploring the manipulation and generation of visual media, including animation and effects processing. Develop your compositional skills and experiment with direct audio-visual mapping as you acquire industry relevant skills and gain the potential to work on interesting mixed-media projects and showreels in your final year.

    Studies in Musical Style from 1815

    This module investigates topics and issues in music from the 1810s to the early 1960s, building on the context of the late 19th century. You'll investigate music from Beethoven to Mahler and Sibelius and you'll look at early modernism and developments in the musical avant-garde up to the early ‘60s.

    Psychology of Music Performance

    This module will enable you to explore music performance from a psychological point of view. You'll investigate strategies for sight-reading, practising and memorising music, ways to cope with performance anxiety, techniques for solo and ensemble playing, and ways to express music in sound and through the body. You'll also consider the nature-nurture debate and performers’ personalities.

Final year modules

  • Optional

    Special Study (Music)

    This module allows you to undertake an extended project with a specialist and dedicated supervisor through one-to-one tutorial teaching. Your project could take the form of a dissertation or it could be a creative project, such as an EP.

    Acoustic Space: Soundscapes and Psychoacoustics

    You examine the premise of sound as spatial representation and explore its implications. Ambisonics - 360° surround sound - forms a contextual paradigm for further technical engagement with the topic.

    Composing for Film

    Discover the creative and technical challenges of commercial film scoring from a practical perspective as you explore a variety of film-scoring approaches, tools and industry conventions. Gain an understanding of the dramatic and narrative functionality of film music as you explore the story-telling power of music with reference to historical context.

    Advanced Performance 1

    This module will enable you to develop skills in music performance vocally or on a chosen instrument in popular, jazz or classical traditions. You can specialise in solo playing, small group playing (bands or chamber ensembles), accompaniment, conducting or directing.

    Advanced Performance 2

    This module will enable you to develop skills in music performance vocally or on a chosen instrument in popular, jazz or classical traditions. You can specialise in solo playing, small group playing (bands or chamber ensembles), accompaniment, conducting or directing.

    Music, Politics and Contemporary Thought

    You will be introduced to a range of critical, theoretical and analytical approaches in musicology. You'll cover topics including musical analysis, new and critical musicology, gender studies, music historiography, the sociology of music and music philosophy.

    Shakespeare Music

    You will gain stylistic and historical insights into a variety of musical works in western cultures inspired by the plays of Shakespeare from the 17th to the 20th centuries. You'll develop an understanding of musical representations of literary sources by examining musical compositions which employ Shakespeare’s works as the basis for their compositional idea or content.

    Global Pop

    Encounter the music traditions of Africa, Brazil, Cuba and India through performance and composition, and explore the influence they exert on today's popular music around the world.

    Radio Production

    This module explores radio broadcasting as the context to develop and hone precision composition and production skills for a demanding climate. You'll explore the medium in context and the technical creativity required to produce portfolios of musical and functional material for broadcast.

    Composing for Spaces and Places

    Focus on site-specific composition and the performance of such compositional works. Develop your compositional skills by introducing them to a number of creative interpretations of specific spaces and places, including open-form works, promenade performances, landscape composition, sound installation, and collaborative contexts such as dance or theatre.

    Music Industry Careers

    Take control of a record company, assuming various roles as you promote and release new music, learning aspects of the record industry through first-hand experience.

    Individual Project (Music) (T1)

    This module gives you the opportunity to study a topic of your own choosing with expert supervision. The choice of topic is very broad and you may offer an empirical study, an extended piece of music criticism, a folio of compositions, or a mixed-media project.

    Live Sound

    You will get theoretical and hands-on instruction in using live sound equipment. At the end of the module, you'll have produced a technical rider for a show and completed a soundcheck for a band's performance.

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

How you'll study

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Overall workload

372 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

828 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

8%
12%
80%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

204 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

996 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

29%
71%
  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Overall workload

216 hours

Scheduled study Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions.

984 hours

Independent study Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently.

Indicative assessment proportions

13%
15%
72%
  • Examination

    Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

  • Practical

    Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

  • Coursework

    Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Music BMus Pippa Brazier UNI-2165
Pippa Brazier Music

Why I chose Music at Hull

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Entry Requirements

During Clearing we look at all of your qualifications and experience, not just your academic grades – you’re more than just letters on a page!

Some courses still do have requirements such as previous study in your subject area, or specific GCSE grades. Others have additional requirements such as an interview or a satisfactory DBS check.

Please call us now on 01482 462236 to find out if we have a course that’s suitable for you.

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. See other English language proficiency qualifications accepted by this University.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Our teaching staff

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Take a tour of the facilities

You'll enjoy 24-hour access to our industry standard 48-track SSL recording complex and 3D surround-sound 16.4 ambisonic studio.

Fees & funding

Home / EU

£9,250 per year*

International

£14,000 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Attainment
Scholarship

If you achieve

112 UCAS tariff points

from three A levels or equivalent, you could receive a reward of

£1,200

Find out more

An affordable city for students

From bills, to meals, to pints – you’ll find that your money goes a lot further in Hull.

Your future prospects

  • Sound engineer
  • Studio producer
  • Session musician
  • Music teacher
  • Music therapist
  • Broadcaster

We emphasise the practical and creative aspects of music making – so when you graduate, you'll be well versed in industry-relevant hardware and software.

This programme has been designed with employment and professional skills development in mind.

Open Day at University of Hull

Ready to apply?

You can apply for this course through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

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This. Is. Hull.

A place where we stand up to kings, do deals with the world and take a wrecking ball to the slave trade. A place where culture stands out and the phone boxes are a different colour. A place where we're free-thinking, independent and proud of it.

*Percentage of students in work or further study within six months of graduating: UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey for the academic year 2016/17, published by HESA 2018