politics

Faculty of Business, Law and Politics

British Politics and Legislative Studies

UndergraduateBA (Hons)

Year of entry:
UCAS code: L230

What you'll study

Gain a thorough understanding of the British political system. Then apply it to the real world during a unique 12-month placement in Westminster.

The third year of this course is spent in Westminster, working for a Member of Parliament or a peer.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • British Political History since 1945

    This module details the political history of the UK after World War Two. From Eden to the EEC and from Wilson to the 'Winter of Discontent', encounter the people, ideas and policies that have shaped modern Britain.

  • British Government

    In the age of Brexit, who governs Britain? Discover the institutions of the British state from 10 Downing Street to the Houses of Parliament, from Whitehall to the devolved assemblies, and from the Conservative Party to Labour.

  • Introduction to Comparative Politics

    This module introduces you to comparative politics as an approach to studying states. It combines a thematic assessment of key features of modern states (which provides the basis of comparison) with a country-by-country study: allowing you to begin making comparisons.

  • Introduction to the Politics of the World Economy

    Explore how politics defines the power map of the world's economy and provides the constitution for markets. We'll introduce you to the principal ideas, institutions, policies and institutions that shape the politics of the global economy.

  • Understanding the European Union

    Learn about the history and politics of the European Union. You'll assess the EU's main actors, such as the European Council, Commission and European Parliament. And you'll also consider its core policies, including the European Single Market, economic and monetary Union, environmental policy and the Common Foreign and Security Policy, as well as the implications of Brexit.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Philosophy, History and Ideology

    Learn how to analyse the structure of contemporary political ideologies and assess the historical interrelations between key philosophical concepts and their political implications.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • The Contemporary House of Commons

    Study the functions of the UK House of Commons and how they are shaped by the changes in the political environment. Having looked at what MPs do collectively, the module concludes by looking at what members do individually, primarily as constituency representatives.

  • Electoral and Voting Systems

    Electoral systems aren't neutral: the system creates the results. Stalin said, “It's not the people who vote that count. It's the people who count the votes.” Join the investigation into how far systems of voting determine election results around the world.

  • Comparative Legislatures

    Examine the role of legislatures and their functions, looking at how they fit within particular systems of government. You'll explore case studies such as the Westminster model, the US Congress, the Brazilian, German, South African and Chinese parliaments and the European Parliament.

  • Paths of Research

    Discover the full range of research techniques and skills used in the academic study of politics. This module introduces everything you'll need for conducting research in your own area of interest within the field of politics, from statistical analysis to using texts.

  • Parliament in the UK: Approaches to Reform

    Study the UK Parliament in the context of constitutional change, both actual and proposed. Examine the work of the House of Lords and the consequences of incremental change within Parliament. Explore electoral reform, pressure for a Bill of Rights, devolution, referendums and membership of the European Union.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • Terrorism, War and Ethics

    Explore the history and evolution of terrorism and its political and legislative impact, as well as ethical arguments around it. You'll uncover the history of terrorism and learn about violent political groups from the 19th century to the present day.

  • Understanding China

    This module examines the economic transformations of contemporary China in a historical, cultural and political context. You'll evaluate the major issues and challenges facing the People’s Republic of China.

  • The Politics and Philosophy of the Environment

    How should we think about the environment? And how should we act towards to it? You'll study environmental attitudes, the politics and ideology of environmentalism, its ethics and philosophy, pressure groups and political parties, and the principles of environmental policy.

  • Ethnic Conflict Resolution and Peace Building

    Engaging theoretical concepts and empirical cases, this module analyses ethno-national conflicts, their resolution and the challenges of post-conflict peace building. It examines cases such as the Israel-Palestine Conflict, the Northern Ireland peace process, the Darfur Crisis, the Kurds question, and the Tamil-Sinhalese conflict.

Industrial placement

The third year is spent in Westminster working for a Member of Parliament or a peer. While on placement, you’ll also complete the following modules.

  • Research Proposal
  • Research Paper
  • Self-Evaluation Document

You'll be fully supported throughout your internship – both in Westminster by former Hull placement students who now work there full-time, and by our dedicated member of staff in Hull who will be in regular contact.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Long Dissertation

    Develop a specialist subject. Research and write a 12,000 word dissertation with academic supervision. A module of independent study.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester. And some modules may require prior study (taking an earlier module, for example).

  • European Union Politics and Institutions

  • Being Great

    Gain an understanding of the role that great powers play in international politics and of how their existence and role serves to challenge some of the central tenets of traditional international relations thinking. At a time of major shifts in global power, it will enable you to make sense of some of the key issues of contemporary international politics.

  • BRICS: Emerging Powers in International Affairs

    Develop your theoretical and empirical knowledge to understand and comparatively examine the challenges facing the five emerging powers (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) in the shifting power structures of international affairs.

  • The World We’re in: Globalisation and Democratic Governance in Practice

    Explore the politics of globalisation, global governance and provision of global public goods for human development. You'll look at issues such as security, prosperity, financial stability and sustainability through case studies of the United Nations, International Monetary Fund, World Bank, World Economic Forum and World Trade Organization.

  • Critics of Capitalism

    In this module, you study some of the most important critics of politics and the economy in capitalist societies. You'll explore issues such as capitalist oppression, the nature of work, the corruption of music and art by 'big business', vanity and alienation, exploitation, and capitalism's alleged continuing imperialist machinations, as well as exploring alternatives to capitalism.

"I'm currently being taught by Lord Norton of Louth, so I'm being taught by people who are actually currently sitting in the House of Lords."

Lucy Dunwell Watch Video

More about this course

This unique course offers a full 12-month placement working alongside an MP or peer in Westminster. You’ll gain an in-depth understanding of British parliamentary procedures and protocols in this intellectually demanding programme.

  • Our links with a large pool of MPs mean we're likely to be able to match you with a politician whose role reflects your area of political interest.
  • You'll enjoy access to our exclusive seminar series presented by senior Parliamentary officials including Black Rod and the Speaker.
  • 92% of our graduates are in work or further study within six months (UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey for the academic year 2016/17, published by HESA 2018)
  • Our graduates are so widespread at Westminster and Whitehall they're affectionately known as the 'Hull mafia'.

Studying at Hull opens doors to those considering a career in Parliament. Our graduates are well known throughout the major UK political parties. And it's because of the quality and prestige of this course that Hull has produced more special advisors (SpAds) than any other university.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

70%

30%

Second year

42%

58%

Industrial placement

100%

Final year

34%

66%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

The largest Westminster placement scheme in the UK, with unmatched access to MPs.

Our graduates are so numerous at Westminster and Whitehall, they’ve become known as the 'Hull Mafia'.

You could visit Brussels as part of your degree and see the inner workings of the European Union.

Our expert staff are recognised globally as contributing to the cutting-edge of political research.

Entry requirements

2019 Tariff Points: 128 points. Points can be from any qualification on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from 

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 32 points
  • Access to HE Diploma: pass with 45 credits at distinction

Shortlisted applicants will be invited to interview.

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £14,000 per year

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

This course leads to a variety of careers, such as political consultancy, the media, the Civil Service, public relations, political parties, Parliament, charities, as well as international organisations. Recent examples include Head of Operations at Conservative Campaign Headquarters; Managing Director of Edleman Public Affairs; Head of Development (Factual Programmes) at the BBC; Director of UK Government Affairs at Hewlett Packard Ltd; Public Affairs Manager at Network Rail; and Head of Public Affairs at the Royal British Legion.

We like to keep in touch with our graduates and do so by facilitating the Graduates Association. Members are notified of interesting news and events occurring in the world of Politics as well as receiving an annual copy of the Graduate Directory, which is an excellent tool for networking, particularly in the early stages of your career.