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Faculty of Science and Engineering

Zoology

UndergraduateBSc (Hons) Available in Clearing

Year of entry:
UCAS code: C300

What you'll study

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Skills for Biology

  • Cells and Organelles

    Explore the fascinating inner workings of cells, giving you a foundation in areas such as cell biology, molecular biology and biochemistry. You'll cover topics such as cancer biology, how cells respond to hormones, and how proteins are regulated. You'll learn how to use equipment in research laboratories and design, carry out and write up your own experiment.

  • Diversity of Life

  • Principles of Genetics

    Explore core genetic concepts leading to an understanding of how genetics underlies the biological and molecular traits observed in organisms. You will cover the following topics: gene and chromosome structure, DNA replication, mechanisms of transcription and translation, genetic inheritance, genetic variation, and the principles behind techniques used to analyse the genome.

  • Ecology and Evolution

  • Dive Training

  • Science Communication

    Communicating science effectively is a skill you will need within your degree and beyond. This module allows you to learn theory and practise of communicating a topic related to your degree, in a range of ways (video, writing, infographics) and for a range of audiences.

  • Chemistry of Life

    The basis of all life is? Yes, a chemical - join this module to understand the building blocks of biomolecules, their reactivity and biological examples that help to understand organisms physiology, ecology, health and evolution.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Professional and Research Skills for Biologists

    Develop key experimental design and data analysis skills necessary for your degree. You’ll learn how to identify and evidence your skills and experience, to help you secure employment in the future.

  • Animal Form and Function

    The module provides an integrated view of animal biology by showing how ecology shapes morphology, physiology and behaviour in different animals and across different environments, from marine to terrestrial ecosystem.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Evolutionary Biology

  • Fish Ecology

    Develop a detailed understanding of fisheries science covering taxonomy, distribution, growth, mortality, population dynamics, feeding, reproduction, parasites and predation. The module is under-pinned by theoretical and practical exercises allowing you to understand key fisheries assessment methods used globally.

  • Behavioural Ecology

  • Conservation Biology

  • Aquatic Zoology

  • Geographic Information Systems

  • Genetic Analysis

    Takes a problem-based approach to understanding modern molecular genetics and genomics of eukaryotes. You will become accustomed with modern methods of laboratory investigation and genetic data analysis and debate current discoveries.

  • Intertidal Systems

    Here we look at the temporal and spatial factors affecting composition and productivity of intertidal systems, and the sustainability of intertidal resources. Develop your field sampling and laboratory identification skills and apply them in an intertidal monitoring context.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Your final year includes residential field studies, an optional placement in industry, and a research project which you can complete as a member of one of the faculty's research groups or at Hull's award-winning submarium, The Deep.

Optional modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Sensory Physiology of Animals

    Discover the fascinating world of animal communication to learn how sensory systems control behaviour, and how this is applied and affected by human activity, including climate change.

  • Freshwater Fisheries and Conservation

    Develop an understanding of the status and importance of freshwater fisheries worldwide. You will learn how humans impact on freshwater fisheries, rehabilitation processes, conservation methods and legislative instruments all used to protect and develop fisheries.

  • Biology in Education

    This exciting module enables you to conduct original research in a subject of your choosing, within the broad area of Educational studies. You will plan, implement and report with guidance from a supervisor and through guided group tutorials.

  • Field Studies

  • Independent Research Project

    You will have the unique opportunity to work on your own lab-based project alongside researchers. You'll have direct input into experimental design and will analyse your data before writing it up in a dissertation. For many students, this is the highlight of their degree as it's a chance to show off your skills in a real-world environment.

  • Concepts in Ecology

    Should we focus conservation of species on their importance or their vulnerability? How much is a coral reef worth and is it more valuable than a mangrove? Why can’t we just stop things from going extinct?These kinds of questions are the foundation of this module. You'll consider how theoretical ecological concepts impact applied ecological processes (such as conservation).

  • Insect Biology

    Insects are among the most numerous, diverse and awesome creatures on the planet - an Aladdin's cave, bursting with weirdness, colour and intrigue. They are also among the most important animals - vital to ecosystems we depend on, but also wreaking terrible destruction. In a mix of lectures, workshops, practicals and fieldtrips, you will discover this amazing, crazy little world we’re lucky enough to study.

  • Wildlife Management

  • Sex and Social Behaviour

    Evolutionary biology and behavioural ecology are taken to the next level in this module, in which you'll develop a deeper understanding of fascinating topics such as the evolution of sex, cryptic female choice and sperm competition, sexual conflict, parental care, brood parasitism and co-operative breeding and much more.

  • Extinction

    Investigate and discuss questions on prehistoric, historical and contemporary extinctions, from genetic, evolutionary, ecological, paleoecological, geographical and geological perspectives.

  • Practical Conservation

    Work in partnership with local environmentally orientated organisations to help further their objectives. You'll learn about the day-to-day practicalities of species/habitat management, population surveys, public engagement and promoting sustainable use of environmental resources.

  • Structured Research Project

“When I hear people talking about Hull, I feel really proud.”

Nadira Hendarta Watch Video

More about this course

Our Zoology programme explores all aspects of animal life, from sub-cellular level to ecosystems, combining traditional zoology and contemporary biology in an exciting and rewarding course for 21st-century scientists. Field study is an integral part of the programme which includes opportunities for residential field courses in locations including Scotland, Mallorca, Malaysia and Brazil, as well as day-to-day fieldwork opportunities which allow you to put the theory you learn into practice. Students have the opportunity to train as scuba divers to PADI Advanced Open Water level within the Dive Training module. Placements in industry or in schools, as well as the possibility to complete your final-year project in one of our research groups or at Britain's only submarium, The Deep in Hull, provide you with valuable career insights.

Specialisation is a major feature of our programme, allowing you to choose a zoological area tailored to your career goals such as conservation biology, animal behaviour, evolutionary genetics or physiology. Your learning experience is underpinned by research active academics, hands-on experience of modern lab and field research techniques, excellent facilities and a supportive setting. The option of a foundation year is ideal if you do not have a strong enough background in biology to meet our direct entry requirements for the full BSc course.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

52%

23%

25%

Second year

43%

13%

44%

Final year

17%

9%

73%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

Learn to scuba dive and become a PADI-certified advanced open water diver (extra fee may be payable).

Exciting field work opportunities in the UK or in destinations like Brazil, Malaysia or Mallorca.

Learn in superb facilities such as our botanical gardens and brand new environmental classroom.

Study under world-leading experts on vital issues such as climate change and environmental DNA.

Find out more

Entry requirements

During Clearing we look at all of your qualifications and experience, not just your academic grades – you're more than just letters on a page!

Some courses do still have requirements such as previous study in your subject area, or specific GCSE grades. Others have additional requirements such as an interview or a satisfactory DBS check.

Please call us now on 01482 462238 to find out if we have a course that’s suitable for you.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £16,000 per year*

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

Many of our graduates go into successful careers as professional biologists, laboratory officers, environmental consultants, microbiologists and diving related positions. Others go into a diverse range of careers with employers such as RB, the Environment Agency, Natural England, wildlife trusts, and conservation agencies. Students also go into postgraduate study across the world, including enrolling on our own taught Environmental Change Monitoring and Management degree, research Masters programmes, or PhDs.

Our course is designed with employability in mind to help develop the skills for a range of careers that require biology-focused graduates.