Learning-Disibility-2-Cropped

Faculty of Health Sciences

Social Enterprise and Creative Care

UndergraduateBA (Hons)

Year of entry:
UCAS code: L400

What you'll study

Learn how to use innovative and enterprising thinking to improve the quality of life for those affected by disability, ill health, poverty, trauma or social exclusion.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Working in a Digital World

    ​This module introduces you to the possibilities of contemporary digital technologies and platforms. You'll explore your own digital and social media identities, before developing a range of skills and knowledge to thrive in the digital world. From crowdfunding and bitcoin to vero and beyond, the possibilities are endless!​

  • Human Development and Diversity

    Explore some of the key concepts and themes in the study of development and diversity. The module takes a ‘life-span’ approach and you'll consider the centrality of relationships in wellbeing, including consideration of attachment, separation and loss. The module takes a positive approach to diversity, celebrating difference and atypical trajectories, exploring for example, the theme of neuro-diversity and the autistic experience.​

  • Identities and Inequalities

    Explore a range of social inequalities that can accrue in the context of diverse social and personal identities. Looking across the human lifespan, you'll be introduced to the ways in which our personal and collective experience is socially constructed. You'll be encouraged to think about the ways in which discrimination, marginalisation and the pathologisation of 'difference' can be addressed.​

  • The Politics of Care

    ​This module introduces you to different viewpoints and understandings of the concept of ‘care’. You'll explore a range of political and philosophical approaches to care, for instance considering the influence of the disability movement and feminist insights into care and caring.​

  • Mindfulness and Compassion

    Engage in your own self-care using the notion of mindfulness as a starting point. You'll develop a range of skills and understandings which will help you to reflect upon your own values and worldviews.You'll explore the concept of emotional intelligence and consider the importance of religious, spiritual and secular understandings of the notion of compassion.​

  • Communication, Citizenship and Participation

    ​This module introduces you to the principles of good communication in a range of contemporary contexts. You'll have the opportunity to develop and rehearse the skills required to communicate effectively with individuals and groups. You'll also explore the importance of communication styles and consider the impact of inclusive technologies and approaches.​

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Health, Wellbeing and Social Care

    ​This module introduces you to a range of understandings about the human body and the ways in which it is variously policed, managed and cared for in the context of contemporary health and well-being. Specific issues such as loss, death and decline are examined alongside broader themes of care and mutual interdependency.​

  • Social Enterprise

    Examine the growing significance of social enterprises and other forms of independent sector businesses within the world of social care and beyond. You'll consider the role of social entrepreneurs in developing new approaches to difficult problems and learn from the experiences of successful social care innovators and pioneers.​

  • Working with Individuals, Groups and Communities

    Examine a range of different approaches to direct work with people. For instance, you'll consider the relative strengths of working with individuals and working with groups and communities. In addition, the module introduces you to successful projects and skilled practitioners and innovators from the region.​

  • Explorations in the Creative Arts

    Develop an understanding of the importance of human creativity and the potential for us to use the creative arts in a therapeutic and powerful way. You'll explore the importance of the creative arts with individuals and groups who are seldom considered to be artists themselves, such as people with learning disabilities or a diagnosis of dementia.​

  • Social Research

    ​Social research can help people to make sense of their lives and can support changes and genuine improvements. Explore the ways in which researchers make sense of the social world. You'll focus on the philosophical, ideological and practical aspects of social research, engaging in some of the key debates around the planning, organisation and interpretation of research evidence.​

  • Ethical and Legal Frameworks

    ​This module introduces you to the political and social contexts within which social care is delivered. Most fundamentally, the module asks ‘what is law and how does it underpin social care practice’? The module focuses, in particular, on issues of rights, responsibilities and entitlements, using equalities legislation to explore the ways in which different individuals and groups are both policed and protected.​

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Enterprise in Action

    ​This module allows you to engage in the 'real world' of social enterprise. Based in a specific social enterprise or company, you will be supported to identify and develop new ideas for practical solutions to social issues and challenges. For example, you could work alongside the business development manager of a social enterprise or charity to help develop a new service targeting a group of people with a particular social need.​

  • Evaluation in a Digital World

    ​Successful social enterprises and community projects understand how well they are doing and what they need to do better. Collecting helpful data about services is crucial to support this understanding. You'll be introduced to a range of evaluation strategies and methods of monitoring success, including participative approaches and digital data collection platforms.​

  • Dissertation

    You will make an original contribution to research by designing, carrying out and writing up your own project on a topic you choose, supported by your dissertation supervisor.

Sorry, we are no longer taking applications for this course for 2018.

More about this course

This course aims to educate a new generation of project pioneers to enhance the quality of life for those affected by disability, ill health, poverty, trauma or social exclusion. We focus on engaging and sustaining communities to improve wellbeing – while developing your skills in leadership, social welfare, project management and solving practical problems. You'll study key topics such as

  • Enterprising welfare – equipping you with skills in applying for funding, designing websites and managing projects
  • Creative practice using art, music and drama
  • Contemporary developments in the social care landscape and the growth in the significance of social enterprise and charities
  • A reflexive and experiential approach to developing socio-emotional intelligence
  • Theories and practices of wellbeing
  • How we express personal–professional ethics in life and work, and how they relate to laws, politics and cultures

You'll have the opportunity to carry out work-based learning in your final year. And you'll gain what will become a well-regarded qualification with robust practice experience.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Click to view on Google Maps
Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

Work with leading experts and benefit from real-world experience to prepare for a career as a confident and compassionate professional.

Work in partnership with social enterprises, charities and social care businesses to develop innovative projects and improve provision.

Entry requirements

During Clearing we look at all of your qualifications and experience, not just your academic grades – you're more than just letters on a page!

Some courses do still have requirements such as previous study in your subject area, or specific GCSE grades. Others have additional requirements such as an interview or a satisfactory DBS check.

Please call us now on 01482 462238 to find out if we have a course that’s suitable for you.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £13,500 per year*

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

Graduates of this new programme will have the skills, knowledge and confidence to pursue successful careers in the social care and wellbeing industry. 

Some graduates will join leading charities and other social businesses, enhancing the lives of people with disabilities or long-term health issues. Others will use their knowledge and experience to become innovators and social entrepreneurs, creating pioneering solutions to social issues and problems.

Throughout the course, you’ll have many opportunities to develop your own network of contacts and associates, as well as being introduced to social care business leaders and successful project managers. When you graduate, we’ll support you to consolidate these networks and to use your contacts to help you identify your own unique and dynamic career pathway.