politics

Faculty of Business, Law and Politics

Politics

UndergraduateBA (Hons) Available in Clearing

Year of entry:
UCAS code: L200

What you'll study

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • British Political History since 1945

    This module details the political history of the UK after World War Two. From Eden to the EEC and from Wilson to the 'Winter of Discontent', encounter the people, ideas and policies that have shaped modern Britain.

  • Introduction to International Relations

    You’ll develop an understanding of the theories that have been developed to advance our understanding of the way in which politics operates on a global level, and of the ways in which the field of International Relations is expanding today.

  • Introduction to Comparative Politics

    This module introduces you to comparative politics as an approach to studying states. It combines a thematic assessment of key features of modern states (which provides the basis of comparison) with a country-by-country study: allowing you to begin making comparisons.

  • Philosophy, History and Ideology

    Learn how to analyse the structure of contemporary political ideologies. And discover to assess the historical interrelations between key philosophical concepts and their political implications.

  • Introduction to the Politics of the World Economy

    Explore how politics defines the power map of the world's economy and provides the constitution for markets. We'll introduce you to the principal ideas, institutions, policies and institutions which shape the politics of the global economy.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Introduction to War and Politics

    This module covers the causes and conduct of war in the modern period. It charts the development of warfare from the First World War to ongoing conflicts in our own time. Along the way, you'll discover why the Allies won the Second World War, why the United States lost in Vietnam, how nuclear weapons affect international security, and how counterinsurgency and counterterrorism work.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • British Government

    In the age of Brexit, who governs Britain? Discover the institutions of the British state from 10 Downing Street to the Houses of Parliament, from Whitehall to the devolved assemblies, and from the Conservative Party to Labour.

  • Understanding States and Markets: An Introduction to Political Economy

    Discover the history of ideas in political economy, and the relevance of these ideas for contemporary politics. You’ll explore the ideas of all the major schools, including the work of Adam Smith, Friedrich List, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, Friedrich Hayek, Marianna Mazzucato, Joseph Stiglitz, and the student-led campaign for greater pluralism in economics.

  • History of Political Thought

    You will learn about the thought and historical context of a selection of the most important philosophers and political theorists to have written about collective power, human nature, freedom, justice, rights, community and the state, including Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Mill, Rousseau, Hegel, Green and Marx.

  • Paths of Research

    Discover the full range of research techniques and skills used in the academic study of politics. This module introduces everything you'll need for conducting research in your own area of interest within the field of politics, from statistical analysis to using texts.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Understanding the European Union

    Learn about the history and politics of the European Union. You'll assess the EU's main actors, such as the European Council, Council, Commission and European Parliament, and its core policies, the European Single Market, Economic and Monetary Union, environmental policy and the Common Foreign and Security Policy, as well as the implications of Brexit.

  • Understanding America

    This module will provide you with a general introduction to the political culture and institutions of the United States, and the environment in which those institutions operate. You'll learn about the USA’s international role and behaviour and the complex relationship between the domestic and international aspects of American politics.

  • Terrorism, War and Ethics

    Explore the history, evolution and political and legislative impact of terrorism, as well as ethical arguments around it. You'll uncover the history of terrorism and learn about violent political groups from the 19th century to the present day.

  • Understanding China

    This module examines the economic transformations of contemporary China in a historical, cultural and political context. You'll evaluate the major issues and challenges facing the People’s Republic of China.

  • The Politics and Philosophy of the Environment

    How should we think about the environment? And how should we act towards to it? You'll study environmental attitudes, the politics and ideology of environmentalism, its ethics and philosophy, pressure groups and political parties, and the principles of environmental policy.

  • Ethnic Conflict Resolution and Peace Building

    Engaging theoretical concepts and empirical cases, this module analyses ethno-national conflicts, their resolution and the challenges of post-conflict peace building. It examines cases such as Israel-Palestine Conflict, Northern Ireland peace process, Darfur Crisis, the Kurds question, and Tamil-Sinhalese conflict.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

The final year consists entirely of optional modules.

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Dissertation

  • UK Politics in an Age of Austerity

    Explore the most important contemporary political debates about economic, social and political renewal. You'll cover topics such as: Brexit, austerity, reform of the National Health Service, the future of the welfare state, foreign policy, constitutional reform, and the politics of the two major UK political parties.

  • Being Great

    Gain an understanding of the role that Great Powers play in international politics and of how their existence and role serves to challenge some of the central tenets of traditional International Relations thinking. At a time of major shifts in global power, it will enable you to make sense of some of the key issues of contemporary international politics.

  • BRICS: Emerging Powers in International Affairs

    Develop your theoretical and empirical knowledge to understand and comparatively examine the challenges facing the five emerging powers (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) in the shifting power structures of international affairs.

  • Dangerous Minds

    Study the fascinating relationship between ideas, the people who promote them, and political practice. From Plato, to Machiavelli, Gentile, Heidegger, Schmitt, and Strauss, explore just how influential and dangerous ideas can be.

  • One Semester Abroad

    An opportunity to study for a semester abroad at any of our partner institutions. Select a number of modules on offer from the host institution to count towards your Hull degree.

  • One-Trimester Internship

    Take the opportunity of applying your degree learned knowledge in a real working environment provided by one of our unique internship opportunities: and enhance your chance of getting a job at the same time.

  • The World We’re in: Globalisation and Democratic Governance in Practice

    Explore the politics of globalisation, global governance and provision of global public goods for human development. You'll look at issues such as security, prosperity, financial stability and sustainability through case studies of the United Nations, International Monetary Fund, World Bank, World Economic Forum, and World Trade Organization.

  • Critics of Capitalism

    In this module, you study some of the most important critics of politics and the economy in capitalist societies. You'll explores issues such as capitalist oppression, the nature of work, the corruption of music and art by "big business", vanity and alienation, exploitation, and the capitalism's alleged continuing imperialist machinations, as well as exploring alternatives to capitalism.

  • One-Trimester Dissertation

    Research and write a 6,000 word dissertation that captures your imagination. A module of independent study with academic supervision.

If you opt for the One-Semester Internship, you'll have access to our exclusive seminar series presented by senior parliamentary officials including Black Rod, the Speaker, the Serjeant-at-Arms, and the Clerk of the House of Commons.

This course has places available in Clearing 2018

Call 01482 462238 now Apply online

"I'm currently being taught by Lord Norton of Louth, so I'm being taught by people who are actually currently sitting in the House of Lords."

Lucy Dunwell Watch video

More about this course

For more than 35 years, our BA Politics degree has produced graduates who have put their political skills and knowledge into practice. They've pursued careers of public and political prominence at Westminster, in Whitehall, at the BBC and with many other organisations all over the world. What distinguishes politics at Hull is the opportunity to apply your studies to the real world. We have an established programme of internships with public and private organisations, including a challenging three-month placement at Westminster. You can also choose to study at one of our partner universities in Europe, Hong Kong or North America.

This programme focuses on the most important topics and debates in past and contemporary politics. Key advances in human security and welfare, political theory, political economy, development and environmental sustainability, and British Politics are just some of the issues you'll analyse in detail. You’ll be encouraged to question conventional wisdom and your own preconceived ideas. And you'll graduate with the ability to think as a political analyst, theorist, historian, or an actual politician or political activist. Our BA Politics with a Foundation Year degree is ideal if you've had time away from education or need to enhance your language and writing skills.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

63%

37%

Second year

67%

7%

26%

Final year

42%

58%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

The largest Westminster placement scheme in the UK, with unmatched access to MPs.

Our graduates are so numerous at Westminster and Whitehall, they’ve become known as the 'Hull Mafia'.

You could visit Brussels as part of your degree and see the inner workings of the European Union.

Our expert staff are recognised globally as contributing to the cutting-edge of political research.

Entry requirements

During Clearing we look at all of your qualifications and experience, not just your academic grades – you're more than just letters on a page!

Some courses do still have requirements such as previous study in your subject area, or specific GCSE grades. Others have additional requirements such as an interview or a satisfactory DBS check.

Please call us now on 01482 462238 to find out if we have a course that’s suitable for you.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £13,500 per year*

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

Many of our graduates are now working within the political arena in Westminster or Whitehall as party members, consultants, researchers and Civil Servants. Our graduates are so numerous there, they are known as the 'Hull Mafia'.

Some of the posts held by our graduates include: Senior Assistant, Prime Minister’s Political Office; Director of Communications, Financial Times; Member of Parliament; Senior Communications Advisor, International Committee of the Red Cross (Geneva); Film Director, ITV Tonight Programme; and Head of Political Communications, the Labour Party.

This course also leads to careers within the non-governmental sector, the media, public relations, academia, charities and international organisations. You can also choose the pathway to further study and training; our graduates have gone onto Masters courses in Political Research, International Relations and Global Politics.

As a graduate, you will continue to have access to the University Careers Service, which will provide a wealth of advice, information and guidance to help ready you for the world of work.