english

Faculty of Arts, Cultures and Education

English Language, Linguistics and Cultures

UndergraduateBA (Hons) Available in Clearing

Year of entry:
UCAS code: QQ31

What you'll study

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Introduction to Language Awareness

    This module has been designed as an introductory overview and analysis of the core features of English language. You will be exposed to a variety of structures and systems of the English language and you'll de-construct and evaluate their nature and form.

  • Skills for Communicating Cultures

    Develop awareness of the cultural influences affecting your use of language to become a better communicator in an increasingly globalised world. You'll explore the subject through your own language knowledge and through engagement in other languages being studied and taught across the school.

  • Language, Power and Society

    Develop your ability to closely analyse texts using the techniques and methods of critical discourse analysis. Learn how to systematically identify the ways that ideology, inequality and social injustice are excused, perpetuated, made less obvious, and how they are resisted.

  • English Language in its Global Context

    Examine the complex social and political processes involved in the establishment and ongoing development of the English language. This module provides an insightful awareness to the dynamic roles, status and variation in this global common language from a worldwide perspective.

  • Ideas and Identity: The Construction of National Identity

    Discover new and innovative ways of thinking about the national and cultural identities that are central to the language(s) you will be studying during your degree. You will learn about important cultural narratives and identity politics, by focusing on topics and texts in your chosen language(s) of study: French, Spanish, English, Italian, German and Chinese.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • America: in Theory

    ‘America in Theory’ provides an overview of critical theories that can enhance your understanding of culture, history, and society, and offers the means to apply these ideas through discussion of case studies. For example, we explore feminist readings of American television programmes, and use critical race theories to examine Gangsta Rap.

  • American Revolutionary Readings

    You'll study some of the greatest works of American literature from the founding of the nation to the start of the 20th century. You'll examine these in the context of religion, folklore, women's rights, slavery and the birth of the modern city – producing new perspectives on classic novels and short stories.

  • Global Histories: the Non-Western World, 1500–Present

    Our histories are Euro-centric: they interpret events from a western perspective. But even though Europe became the world's primary arbiter between the 18th and 20th centuries, history is poly-centric – with many hubs of civilization, culture, trade and influence. This module presents a more balanced view of the world after 1492, when it's possible for the first time to speak of a true global history.

  • The Philosophy of Contemporary Thought and Culture

    This module introduces and explores philosophical questions and influences in their cultural setting; for example, in music, photography, art, film, digital media and entertainment, politics, and contemporary commentary.

  • Passport Languages

    The Passport Foreign Language Scheme provides you with the opportunity to develop your language skills. You can join a module to learn a new foreign language or to improve your existing language skills and intercultural competence. Languages include French, German, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Chinese, Japanese and Russian.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Language, Journalism and Media

    Develop and advance your understanding of critical discourse analysis and its application to the social practices of journalism and media. Topics include: the social practices and structures of journalism; the language of broadcast journalism; the language of magazine journalism; the language of newspaper journalism; and the language or sports journalism to name just a few.

  • Language and Communication

    This module introduces you to the main ideas and principles of communication and interpersonal communication by examining communication from everyday situations to more formal contexts in the workplace. You will examine how people construct, establish, and negotiate relations in a variety of interactional situations.

  • Language and Society

    Develop, in interactive and insightful ways, a deeper understanding of how language acts powerfully as a marker of inclusion or exclusion, defines our individual and collective identity, and contributes to informing and shaping our everyday encounters. Language changes society and society is often reflected in the changes of its language and sub-codes.

  • Introduction to Intercultural Communication

    Discover, in exciting and transformative ways, the fundamental role of communication skills in intercultural contexts and develop the ability to understand and manage intercultural experiences. This is a core knowledge for employability in our global reality.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Contemporary America in Context

    This module considers the history behind each week's news stories. To debunk the myths of changing social and political events, we need to dive deeper to understand the narratives behind the news stories themselves.

  • Trinity CertTESOL 1

    This module offers an introduction to English language teaching leading to the Trinity Certificate in TESOL professional qualification. You'll cover core areas and competencies such as teacher language awareness, teaching approaches, lesson planning and classroom management - as well as gaining some teaching practice experience.

  • Introduction to Language Teaching

    Develop basic language teaching skills, with a particular focus on English as a Foreign Language. As such, it is especially relevant if you are considering spending your Year Abroad as a teaching assistant.

  • New York City in Culture

    New York is the perhaps most visually recognisable of all American cities, but is also arguably the cultural capital of the nation, and has been home and inspiration to countless great artists, writers, musicians, and filmmakers. This module takes an interdisciplinary look at New York as the setting and subject of many works of different media and genres.

  • Cities of Culture

    Rome, Amsterdam, St Petersburg, London, Paris, Vienna, Berlin and New York. Not a list of holiday destinations, but cities at their key cultural moments from the 17th to the 20th centuries. We'll examine the visual culture of these cities in relation to their social, economic and political life.

  • Theorising Gender

    You'll examine differing ways of theorising gender relations, looking at the basis of masculinity and femininity and how these notions are involved in the production of gendered subjectivities. Drawing on feminist sources, alongside contemporary writings on masculinity, critiques from gay and lesbian studies, and recent work on transgendering and transsexuality, recognition is given to the diversity of gendered constructions, the relationship of gender and sexuality, and the intersections of gender with other social divisions.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Languages and Cultures Dissertation

    Hone your research, critical thinking, analytical, writing, and independent study skills by working on a Modern Languages topic related to your programme of study. With input from your subject supervisor, you select your chosen area and conduct research to produce a final dissertation in your specialism.

  • Introduction to Second Language Acquisition

    You will explore the nature of second language acquisition, in particular how languages are learned and the various factors that can explain why some learners are more successful than others.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Popular Cultures

    Engage with cultural products directly as a way of understanding their meaning in a variety of contexts. You'll be introduced to the complexities of the cultural world around us, and, through the use of predominantly popular cultural artefacts, to the ways in which we speak about, consume, like and dislike culture.

  • Trinity CertTESOL 2

    The final stage of the CertTESOL qualification, this module develops and extends core professional skills and competencies - with further teaching practice, learner analysis and materials design and development. On successful completion of integrated Trinity syllabus unit work and requirements, you will then be put forward for this externally awarded qualification.

  • Engagement and Resistance

    Explore the causes and effects of social, political and economic developments. You'll look at global and/or local movements to show how citizens have resisted or created change, to engage with the relationship between cultural life in the countries your are studying and real life, and to reflect on similarities and differences in this relationship across different cultures.

  • Language Learning and Teaching

    Following on from the Introduction to Language Teaching module, you'll look at specific approaches to language teaching in more depth. It is especially relevant if you are considering doing a PGCE or other formal language teacher training after completing your degree.

  • Passport Languages

    The Passport Foreign Language Scheme provides you with the opportunity to develop your language skills. You can join a module to learn a new foreign language or to improve your existing language skills and intercultural competence. Languages include French, German, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Chinese, Japanese and Russian.

  • Discourse, Politics and Power

    Develop a critique of contemporary political practice through the application of critical discourse analysis and its synthesis with work in other relevant disciplinary fields such as politics, policy analysis, sociology and political economy. Engage with current academic work at the forefront of political discourse studies and build your own dataset, analysis and critique.

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More about this course

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

21%

9%

70%

Second year

32%

17%

51%

Final year

19%

15%

66%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

Study English in the city described as the most poetic in England, where Philip Larkin wrote most of his best work.

Become part of the thriving literary and creative scene at the University and beyond.

Superb facilities include the Brynmor Jones Library which is open 24/7 and boasts cutting edge technology and more than a million books.

Gain a first-class grounding in literature, from the medieval era to the 21st century, under the guidance of world-leading experts.

Entry requirements

During Clearing we look at all of your qualifications and experience, not just your academic grades – you're more than just letters on a page!

Some courses do still have requirements such as previous study in your subject area, or specific GCSE grades. Others have additional requirements such as an interview or a satisfactory DBS check.

Please call us now on 01482 462238 to find out if we have a course that’s suitable for you.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £13,500 per year*

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

Language skills and cultural understanding are vital in a world of international cooperation, business and trade. English is no exception - well-developed communication skills are needed at all levels in the workplace. Employers value graduates who have the ability to use different forms of communication, and who are skilled professional communicators.

You’ll leave Hull with strong critical and analytical skills in a range of subjects including history, literature, politics, media, film and visual cultures. This will open up a variety of career paths. You can also choose the pathway to further study – our MA in TESOL and MA in Translation Studies are fantastic progression opportunities.