politics
Year of entry:
UCAS code: LV21

What you'll study

First year

* Modules are subject to availability

Core modules

  • Exploring the Past

    The discipline of history encompasses an almost limitless variety of subjects and approaches. This module introduces you to some of the key areas, moving at a fast pace through seven historical themes.

  • British Political History since 1945

    This module details the political history of the UK after World War Two. From Eden to the EEC and from Wilson to the 'Winter of Discontent', encounter the people, ideas and policies that have shaped modern Britain.

  • Introduction to International Relations

    You’ll develop an understanding of the theories that have been developed to advance our understanding of the way in which politics operates on a global level, and of the ways in which the field of International Relations is expanding today.

  • The Modern World

    The French Revolution of 1789 was arguably the political ‘big bang’ which created the modern world. You'll explore its legacy, as well as that of the Russian Revolution of 1917: an event which defined the 20th century in much the same way as the French Revolution shaped the 19th. 

Optional modules

  • The Medieval World

    Between the 11th and 13th centuries, Europe experienced a transformation so revolutionary and profound that historians now refer to it as 'the making of Europe'. This module introduces the period which was so central to European history and culture.

  • Early Modern People and Their Worlds

    This module introduces the different ways that historians have sought to explain historical change in Europe – and Europe’s changing place in the world – from the late Middle Ages to the dawn of the modern era. It investigates a distinctive, exciting period of history which has done much to shape the world of today.

  • Global Histories: the Non-Western World, 1500–Present

    Our histories are Euro-centric: they interpret events from a western perspective. But even though Europe became the world's primary arbiter between the 18th and 20th centuries, history is poly-centric – with many hubs of civilization, culture, trade and influence. This module presents a more balanced view of the world after 1492, when it's possible for the first time to speak of a true global history.

  • Introduction to War and Politics

    This module covers the causes and conduct of war in the modern period. It charts the development of warfare from the First World War to ongoing conflicts in our own time. Along the way, you'll discover why the Allies won the Second World War, why the United States lost in Vietnam, how nuclear weapons affect international security, and how counterinsurgency and counterterrorism work.

  • Introduction to Politics of the World Economy

Second year

* Modules are subject to availability

Core modules

  • Thinking About the Past

    This module focuses on historiography: the history of history. It deals with how the subject of history and historical writing have evolved from ancient times to the present day.

  • Understanding America

    This module will provide you with a general introduction to the political culture and institutions of the United States, and the environment in which those institutions operate. You'll learn about the USA’s international role and behaviour and the complex relationship between the domestic and international aspects of American politics.

Optional modules

  • British Government

    In the age of Brexit, who governs Britain? Discover the institutions of the British state from 10 Downing Street to the Houses of Parliament, from Whitehall to the devolved assemblies, and from the Conservative Party to Labour.

  • Understanding States and Markets: An Introduction to Political Economy

    Discover the history of ideas in political economy, and the relevance of these ideas for contemporary politics. You’ll explore the ideas of all the major schools, including the work of Adam Smith, Friedrich List, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, Friedrich Hayek, Marianna Mazzucato, Joseph Stiglitz, and the student-led campaign for greater pluralism in economics.

  • British Identity

    'Britishness' is in crisis. Who are we? The answer has changed radically in the last 150 years. A great imperial nation? A union of Anglo-Saxons and Celts? A country of immigrants? Or the wartime saviour of Europe? Brexit has brought these issues into sharp focus. This module might provide some answers.

  • Emperors, Vikings and Scholars: the Transformation of 'Barbarian' Europe, 750–1000

    The fall of the Roman Empire changed the cultural and political landscape of the West forever. In a region that was once only part of a civilisation straddling three continents arose a new political and cultural phenomenon: Europe. This module begins with the Carolingian empire and moves to the dramatic events of the Viking Age, which engulfed the continent between the eighth and tenth centuries.

  • Into the Wild: US Environmental History from the 19th Century to the Present

    An up-to-the-minute exploration of American environmental history and current approaches to the global climate change crisis. Named 'Best Module' in the 2017 students' union Teaching Awards, which are voted for by our students.

  • Understanding the European Union

    Learn about the history and politics of the European Union. You'll assess the EU's main actors, such as the European Council, Council, Commission and European Parliament, and its core policies, the European Single Market, Economic and Monetary Union, environmental policy and the Common Foreign and Security Policy, as well as the implications of Brexit.

  • Terrorism, War and Ethics

    Explore the history, evolution and political and legislative impact of terrorism, as well as ethical arguments around it. You'll uncover the history of terrorism and learn about violent political groups from the 19th century to the present day.

  • A Millennium of Persecution: Jews and Antisemitism in Europe, c.1000-1945

    This module offers a history of the persecution of European Jewry from the medieval to the modern eras. You'll explore an array of local sources – from the medieval archaeology of York and Lincoln to the archives of first-hand Holocaust testimonies held in our Wilberforce Institute here in Hull.

  • Power and Dominion: Expanding Rule in the Atlantic World, 1066-1865

  • Understanding China

    This module examines the economic transformations of contemporary China in a historical, cultural and political context. You'll evaluate the major issues and challenges facing the People’s Republic of China.

Final year

* Modules are subject to availability

Core modules

  • Dissertation

Optional modules

  • Crisis and Conflict after the Cold War: Interpreting the Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s

    The Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s destroyed a country of 20 million people. They shattered dreams of a peaceful utopia after the Cold War. And they gave rise to ideas about the 'clash of civilisations' which live on today. By studying controversies about the causes and course of the wars and their international context, you'll investigate how we make sense of the break-up of Yugoslavia and the legacies of the conflict.

  • Hazards and History: Disasters, Wars and Societies

    Disasters and wars are usually only seen as events that cause death and destruction and there is little attempt at theorising them in an historical context as significant causal factors in the shaping of human societies. In this module you'll study how disasters are never really “natural” but are the outcome of interplay between physical hazards and vulnerable human populations.

  • The Third Reich, 1933-1945

    This module explores the domestic and foreign policies of Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1945. It seeks to explain how and why one of the most cultured nations on Earth – this ‘land of poets and thinkers’ – descended to such depths of barbarity within a few short years.

  • A Racial History of Modern Britain, 1793-1999

    From the Napoleonic Wars to Brexit, a constant flow of migrants to our shores has shaped Britain. Through seminars, lectures and a field trip to Hull's historic docklands, this module reveals the documentary legacy of successive patterns of prejudice.

  • UK Politics in an Age of Austerity

    Explore the most important contemporary political debates about economic, social and political renewal. You'll cover topics such as: Brexit, austerity, reform of the National Health Service, the future of the welfare state, foreign policy, constitutional reform, and the politics of the two major UK political parties.

  • Being Great

    Gain an understanding of the role that Great Powers play in international politics and of how their existence and role serves to challenge some of the central tenets of traditional International Relations thinking. At a time of major shifts in global power, it will enable you to make sense of some of the key issues of contemporary international politics.

  • BRICS: Emerging Powers in International Affairs

    Develop your theoretical and empirical knowledge to understand and comparatively examine the challenges facing the five emerging powers (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) in the shifting power structures of international affairs.

  • Small Wars

  • The US in Vietnam

  • Imperial Colonies: Reinterpreting the American Revolution

    This module looks at the real story of the American Revolution and dispels the myth that it was fought by American ‘patriots’ against the tyranny of George III. You'll discover how the real imperial powers in America were the colonies themselves, which were always largely independent from Britain, and how the conflict of the 1770s was about maintaining that independence, by transforming colonies into states.

  • The Anglo-American ‘special relationship’ and the Middle East, 1945-1973

    The module examines Anglo-American relations in the Middle East from the end of World War Two to the Yom Kippur War. The Middle East has been one the world's most unstable and conflict-ridden territories since 1945. It's an ideal test case for examining the dynamics of the ‘special relationship’ – not least because Britain and the United States both had strong, identifiable interests in the region.

  • Commanding the Oceans: Seapower and British Ascendancy, 1688-1815

    You will study the maritime dimensions of Britain's economic, imperial and military ascendancy. You'll consider seapower in its broadest sense, starting from the assumption that the 'wooden world' of the Navy and the wider world interacted closely at almost every point.

  • The World We’re in: Globalisation and Democratic Governance in Practice

    Explore the politics of globalisation, global governance and provision of global public goods for human development. You'll look at issues such as security, prosperity, financial stability and sustainability through case studies of the United Nations, International Monetary Fund, World Bank, World Economic Forum, and World Trade Organization.

  • Critics of Capitalism

    In this module, you study some of the most important critics of politics and the economy in capitalist societies. You'll explores issues such as capitalist oppression, the nature of work, the corruption of music and art by "big business", vanity and alienation, exploitation, and the capitalism's alleged continuing imperialist machinations, as well as exploring alternatives to capitalism.

  • European Union Politics and Policies

  • One-Semester Internship (Westminster)

If you opt for the One-Semester Internship, you'll have access to our exclusive seminar series presented by senior parliamentary officials including Black Rod, the Speaker, the Serjeant-at-Arms, and the Clerk of the House of Commons.

"There's a lot of history surrounding Hull, and this influences the modules you study. Once I realised that, I knew that I'd be in the ideal place for my course."

Holly Cockerham Watch video

"I'm currently being taught by Lord Norton of Louth, so I'm being taught by people who are actually currently sitting in the House of Lords."

Lucy Dunwell Watch video

More about this course

History and Politics are a natural combination. Knowledge of the past helps us to understand the present day, while politics provides unique insights into history. Inspired by the rich history of Hull and its particular contribution to national politics, this combined programme will enhance your knowledge and understanding of the human experience over the long term, and enable you to apply historical insights to the study of politics and governance today. You’ll have access to our unique research resources in Hull – largely housed at the wonderfully refurbished University Library, the world-leading Wilberforce Institute for the study of Emancipation and Slavery, the distinctive Maritime Historical Studies Centre, and the pioneering Hull History Centre.

Studying at Hull opens doors of opportunity for those considering a career in politics. We have an established programme of internships with public and private organisations, including a challenging three-month placement at Westminster. Our graduates are well known throughout the major UK political parties because we have produced more special advisors (SpAds) than any other university. Our staff are active researchers and authors whose professional expertise underpins the modules they provide. Flexible in its approach, the degree allows you to tailor your studies to suit your own interests and career aspirations, as well as encouraging you to question conventional wisdom and your own preconceived ideas.

Teaching and Learning
Scheduled
Placement
Independent

First year

18%

82%

Second year

18%

82%

Final year

13%

87%

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

27%

8%

65%

Second year

56%

5%

39%

Final year

23%

77%

The largest Westminster placement scheme in the UK, with unmatched access to MPs.

Our graduates are so numerous at Westminster and Whitehall, they’ve become known as the 'Hull Mafia'.

Follow your interests in the social, cultural, art, indigenous, military, maritime and economic history of Britain, Europe and the wider world.

Resources include one of the UK's best university libraries, plus the Hull History Centre, Maritime Historical Studies Centre and the Wilberforce Institute.

Entry requirements

2018 Tariff points: 112 points. Points can be from any qualifications on the UCAS tariff, but must include at least 80 points from

  • A levels
  • BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma, Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • CACHE Diploma or Extended Diploma
  • Irish Leaving Certificate
  • Scottish Highers
  • Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma
  • or a combination of appropriate Level 3 qualifications 

UCAS has changed the way that qualifications earn points under the Tariff system. Please click here to work out your estimated points and to find out more about how the University of Hull considers qualifications.

Alternative qualifications 

  • IB Diploma: 28 points.
  • Access to HE Diploma: pass with minimum of 45 credits at merit.

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match the combinations shown above. Please contact the University’s Admissions Service for individual guidance.

At a glance

For this course, you'll need...

112 UCAS points

Points can be made up of a variety of qualifications. Calculate your points here.

We welcome a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not be listed.

Many of our courses offer a Foundation Year for applicants without the qualifications for direct entry on to the degree.

If you have any questions about our entry requirements or the tariff, please contact admissions or call 01482 466100.

International students

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250
  • International: £13,500

Fees may be subject to permitted inflationary increases in future years. 

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Future Prospects

A joint degree lends itself to various career paths. For those interested in pursuing a career in politics, this course can lead to positions in political consultancy, the media, the Civil Service, public relations, political parties, parliament, charities, as well as international organisations. Many of our graduates are now working within the political arena in Westminster or Whitehall as party members, consultants, researchers and civil servants. Our graduates are so numerous there, they are known as the ‘Hull Mafia’.

Posts held by those who have successfully completed this course include Parliamentary Relations Manager for English Heritage, UK Corporate Affairs Director for Unilever UK; and Chief Executive, Educational and Services Division, at the multinational publishing house of Pearson Education. You can also choose the pathway to further study and training; our graduates have gone onto courses such as Masters courses in both Political and Historical Research, International Relations and Global Politics. There's also the option of becoming a member of our Graduate Association, which will notify you of interesting news and events occurring in the world of politics. You will also receive an annual copy of the Graduate Directory, which is an excellent tool for networking, particularly in the early stages of your career.