crime-scene

Faculty of Arts, Cultures and Education

Criminology with Forensic Science

UndergraduateBA (Hons) Available in Clearing

Year of entry:
UCAS code: M9F4

What you'll study

Hull's a pioneering university for criminology. Combine that track record with theoretical, practical and placement-based learning in forensic science, and you have a stand out course.

If you don't have the academic qualifications to enter the programme directly, we also offer a foundation year to prepare you for degree-level study.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Becoming a Criminologist

    This module focuses on supporting you to develop the skills and principles necessary to be successful in the academic study of Criminology. Essentially, criminologists look at four things; definitions of crime, patterns of crime, causes and explanations for crime, and responses to crime.

  • Criminal justice institutions

  • Introduction to Forensic Science

    Discover the fundamental concepts and principles of forensic science. Explore the treatment of the crime scene and the preservation of evidence, as well as specialist investigation methods including: document evaluation, fire and firearms investigation, scenes of explosion, DNA and other bodily fluids.

  • Collecting Social Data

    The module takes an integrative approach to research ethics and design. This provides a foundation for critical skills in understanding research, as well as the practical skills to conduct independent research.

  • Development of Criminological Theory

    You will study the development of criminological theory, ranging from biological and psychological theories of the 19th and first half of the 20th centuries, to the emergence of new deviancy theory, radical perspectives, and rational choice theories.

  • Introduction to DNA and Chromatography

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Policing and criminal investigation

  • Forensic Science in Practice

    This fascinating module concerns the practical techniques and problem-solving approaches used in forensic science. You will gain practical experience of the techniques used in forensic laboratories as well as studying real forensic and toxicology cases in workshops.

  • Criminology in Late Modernity

    You will look at how contemporary social theory has been used to understand recent developments in crime and crime control, taking in Left and Right Realism, Cultural Criminology, Contemporary Feminist Perspectives and Advanced Marginality.

  • Analysing Social Data

    This module builds on the research methods module Collecting Social Data, and focuses on the next stages of social research, involving analysis and interpretation of research data. You will cover a range of approaches for analysis and interpretation of a variety of qualitative and quantitative social research data.

  • Free Elective

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Punishment, Dangerousness and Risk

    You will study how and why we punish offenders and how offenders are dealt with by the contemporary penal system. You will examine how risk assessment and public protection has influenced the criminal justice system and consider a range of case studies of different type of offenders.

  • Psychology of Offending and Victimisation

    You will learn about the decisions made by offenders in committing crime - such as why burglars choose one house over another - and how the attitudes, emotions and behaviours of victims are affected by those crimes.

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Dissertation

  • Advanced Forensic Science

    Explore the methods for investigating and solving forensic cases, including the importance of following robust and correct procedures. You'll look at the methods of extracting information from collected forensic data and look at the role of toxic compounds and drugs on human processes and metabolism.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Evil

    Study the topic of evil from a number of diverse disciplinary perspectives, including theology, religion, philosophy, race and gender studies, narratology, culture and literary /film studies, psychoanalysis, politics, social psychology, anthropology, sociology and criminology. This is an interesting, challenging module that requires a lot of reflection.

  • Criminal Justice and Community Safety Placements

    You will take part in a proactive work placement where you experience the nature and range of work undertaken by the police and other criminal justice agencies. This provides you with with a wide range of transferable skills and experience to help to enhance your employability.

  • Green Criminology

    Green Criminology is the study of environmental crime, corporate/white collar, and state crime. It includes crimes against animals and also transnational organised crime, in addition to food crime and food security, the illegal trades in wild flora and fauna, and the impacts of climate change upon all types of crime, to name just a few.

  • Quantitative method using SPSS

  • Surveillance and Social Control

    You will study a wide range of competing theoretical perspectives on the emergence of a 'surveillance society' and examine what impact this transformation is having on policing, criminal justice and social justice.

  • Drug Use Today

    You will be introduced to the study of ‘the drug problem’, in Western society from sociological and psychological perspectives. You'll also explore the range of theoretical perspectives used to explain drug using behaviour.

  • Histories of punishment

    You will study the history of punishment and penal policy between the mid-eighteenth and the early twentieth century. You will examine public punishments, notably execution, transportation overseas, the birth of the prison, the operation of the Victorian penal system and the ways in which different offenders have been punished and how this has changed over time (e.g. female offenders, juvenile offenders).

  • Prostitutes, Pickpockets and Peelers: Crime and Policing, 1750-1950

    You will study how society has conceived of the ‘problem of crime’ and public perceptions of crime and responses to it from 1750 to 1950. You will examine crime, offending and crime control mechanisms examining for example, the 'criminal classes', juvenile delinquency, prostitution, rural crime and the development of policing.

  • Transnational Organised Crime

    Become familiar with the historic and contemporary theories and concepts that inform our understanding of Transnational Organised Crime (TOC). You will work on an individual and a group basis to consider a range of contemporary areas of transnational crime, including the trade in illegal drugs and arms, people trafficking for the sex trade and forced labour, cybercrime and online child abuse, terrorism, corporate crime, environmental and wildlife crimes.

  • Desistance

  • Restorative Justice and Peacemaking Criminology

    You will examine the origins and development of restorative justice and peacemaking criminology, and critically analyse their key concepts, values, principles, practices and controversies surrounding them.

  • Contemporary Imprisonment

    You will study broad themes in the contemporary sociology of imprisonment. You'll examine current controversies in the use of imprisonment and consider the effects of incarceration on a range of offenders, including women, young people and children, the elderly and BME groups.

"When I found out about the placement with Humberside Police, I knew Hull was the place for me."

Jasmine Morley Watch Video

More about this course

This fascinating degree allows you to explore the lab and field techniques of the forensic scientist – alongside the causes and solutions to crime. You’ll blend the theory surrounding crime and offending with the science of gathering and testing physical evidence from crime scenes. But what sets criminology at Hull apart?

  • One of the best-established criminology departments in the UK, we pioneered this area of academic study more than 30 years ago.
  • You can study one of your modules in Hong Kong, over a two-week period, where you'll live and learn in a vibrant multicultural city
  • Our links with local, regional and national criminal justice agencies gives you access to work placements and experience-enhancing visits.
  • Our expert staff come from a diverse range of backgrounds. And our choice of modules lets allows you to tailor your degree to your interests.

Throughout your degree, you’ll explore the practical, ethical and scientific debates relating to crime and punishment. You'll also gain an understanding of the collection and processing of body chemistry and DNA evidence.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

42%

4%

54%

Second year

33%

2%

65%

Final year

17%

83%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

Hull pioneered this exciting area of study more than 30 years ago and is one of the UK's leading criminology centres.

Work alongside police officers on placement, applying your theoretical knowledge to real-life situations.

Tailor your degree by combining criminology with sociology, psychology, law or forensic science.

Friendly, accessible, expert staff from a diverse range of backgrounds, each with their own unique approach.

Entry requirements

During Clearing we look at all of your qualifications and experience, not just your academic grades – you're more than just letters on a page!

Some courses do still have requirements such as previous study in your subject area, or specific GCSE grades. Others have additional requirements such as an interview or a satisfactory DBS check.

Please call us now on 01482 462238 to find out if we have a course that’s suitable for you.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £13,500 per year*

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

Demand for Criminology graduates has increased significantly in recent years and our degree equips you with the knowledge and skills that are invaluable for a career in the field of crime and criminal justice. Common career paths for Criminology graduates include the police, prison and probation services, the legal professions and academic or Civil Service research.

We hold an annual Criminal Justice careers event to introduce you to criminal justice and related organisations, helping you make vital career connections.

Once you have started studying at Hull, we are here to guide you at any point of your studies or subsequent career. This is one of the factors that distinguishes us from other universities and the reason our Careers Service was one of the first to be accredited against the new matrix standards. Matrix is the UK mark for advice, information and guidance services.

There's a range of services to assist you in development of skills looked for by employers, including skills workshops, practice interviews and practice ability tests. We offer one-to-one advice and guidance – and you will have a named careers adviser for your subject.