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Faculty of Science and Engineering

Computing

UndergraduateBSc (Hons) Available in Clearing

Year of entry:
UCAS code: G405

What you'll study

Learn the theory behind the advances that define the modern world. And work to master them with the help of two high-spec computing facilities.

Besides the three-year option, there are more specialised versions of this course.

  • You can add a year’s work placement
  • You could study abroad for a year
  • A foundation year boosts your skills and knowledge if you don't quite meet our academic entry requirements

Please note, this course is not available for 2019 entry.

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Your first year covers many fundamental aspects of computer science. You learn through lectures, small group tutorials and practical laboratory sessions.

Your programming skills will be developed using C# and the paradigm of Object Oriented Programming – there are pathways for those with no or little programing experience, and for those who are already accomplished programmers.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Computer Systems

    Gain an overview of what makes the computer perform tasks the programmers ask it to perform. You'll look at basic hardware of the computer, the architecture of a computer system and operating systems, as well as the functionalities required to handle and manage memory and processor times in the presence of multiple users and services.

  • Quantitative Methods for Computing

    Learn and understand some of the key mathematical concepts that underpin and provide the theoretical basis of modern computing.

  • ​Software Engineering and Human Computer Interaction​

    This module takes you beyond programming to software engineering, the discipline concerned with all aspects of complex software production. You'll explore methods for improving planning and software quality, effective elicitation and modelling of software requirements using constrained languages, use cases and state automata, and focus on design for effective human-computer interaction.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Introduction to Programming and Algorithmic Thinking

    This module provides a foundation for students new to programming, or want to further develop existing programming skills. Develop a practical skill that requires both logic and creativity, from understanding basic syntax to constructing bigger and more complex systems, and comparing and evaluating different programming approaches.

  • Programming Paradigms

    You will build on your existing programming experience and start to explore the use of professional development tools and techniques. The primary programming language for this module is C#.

  • Object Oriented Programming and Principles

    This module is designed to build upon the basic knowledge of programming, to reinforce fundamental concepts and develop awareness of the issues involved in the implementation of larger-scale software.

  • Software Project-Based Learning

    Following on from Programming Paradigms, you will apply your programming and development skills as part of a team to produce a solution to a real-world problem scenario.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

In your second year, you specialise more in the area of information systems development. There is a greater focus on practical software development, with more time spent developing in the computer labs and a greater focus on coursework-based assessment. There are also more opportunities for team work, which plays an important part in significant pieces of coursework.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Systems Analysis, Design and Process

    This module aims to introduce the tasks of elicitation, modelling and validation of the requirements of an information system. It includes a combination of lectures, practical classes and substantial group-based activity.

  • Information Systems and Web Technologies

    Explore the concepts, principles and guidelines which underpin the design and implementation of information systems, including network based information systems and enterprise systems. Information system design is introduced from an organisational context and the enabling technologies will also be considered.

  • E-Commerce and E-Business

  • Database Techniques

    A database management system (DBMS) is a program product for keeping computerized records about an enterprise. This module introduces the full implementation of a database system from its original data analysis to a relational table's implementation.

  • Networking and User Interface Design

    This module introduces you to computer networks and the practical problems associated with such interconnections. It also addresses technologies and the role that these play in creating the user interface for enterprise business web applications.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Global Challenge Module

  • Agile Software Development

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

Year 3 provides you with the opportunity to work on specialist areas including: databases; computer systems infrastructure and management; data mining and decision systems; software project management; starting and managing a high-tech business. You will also undertake an individual information systems dissertation project. Previous examples include student timetable management systems, e-commerce websites, financial planning tools, dinner party helpers, and stock control management systems.

The specific knowledge required of an information systems professional depends on the nature of the business. With this in mind, the course has been designed to provide significant optionality within all years – enabling you to focus on the particular aspects of the discipline that will be of most relevance in your chosen career.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Honours Stage Project

    Show your all-round ability to tackle a substantial piece of computer-related investigation or software design in an area of your interest. You will demonstrate project, time and risk management skills and bring the task to a successful conclusion with a quality report, documentation as appropriate and presentation.

  • Starting and Managing a High-Tech Business

    Explore the management, planning and development issues concerning information systems used in an organisation. A key issue is strategic planning to achieve competitive advantage through deployment of information systems, technology, software products and intellectual property. You'll also consider entrepreneurship issues associated with new high-tech business ventures..

  • Computer Systems Infrastructure and Management

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Communicating and Teaching Computing

    Undertake a placement in a school or college to develop understanding of the education process and practical teaching and communication skills. Supporting tutorials explore models of learning, curriculum structures, lesson planning, classroom management and professional awareness.

  • Data Mining and Decision Systems

    This module provides an introduction and overview of data analytics, data mining and decision systems. Fundamental concepts and important techniques are systematically explored through lectures and lab sessions.

  • Visualization

This course has places available in Clearing 2018

Call 01482 462238 now Apply online

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“There was another student at the University who was a friend of mine, he gave me really good feedback of the University. He was telling me about the student experience here and he recommended it. I’ve developed academically and I’ve learned about many opportunities in Computer Science”.

Dimitar Nikovski Watch video

“Hull University is one of the best universities in the country and I thought that is where I want to be”.

Edward Brown Watch video

"Something that gives me great satisfaction as a lecturer, is when students have that light-bulb moment."

Dr David Parker Watch video

More about this course

This is a rewarding combination of computer systems and software implementation for people who want to master the latest in computer technology. You'll gain a grounding in computer science fundamentals and learn about the tech behind a range of commercial and enterprise solutions.

  • Accredited by the British Computer Society (the Chartered Institute for IT) to meet the requirements for full Chartered IT Professional and partial Chartered Engineer status. 
  • Our links to companies like Microsoft, Sony and Studio Gobo ensure our teaching stays up to date and industry relevant.
  • Access to facilities including the Hull Immersive Visualization Environment (HIVE).
  • CV-boosting activities such as our Rather Useful Seminar series, our 'Three Thing Game' development competitions and opportunities to engage with employers.
  • We've enjoyed several wins at the UK stage of the prestigious Microsoft Imagine Cup (a showcase for student achievement) as well as trips to the world finals in India and South Korea.

We cover everything from wearable tech to large-scale server farms. The skills you learn will make you a valuable commodity in the job market – or, with our links to start-up incubators, you'll be well placed to start a business yourself.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

45%

7%

48%

Second year

47%

4%

49%

Final year

57%

10%

33%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

Computer Science at Hull was rated joint sixth for student satisfaction in the Guardian University Guide 2017.

Links to companies like Microsoft, Sony and Electronic Arts ensure our courses stay industry standard, up to date and relevant.

Take part in a variety of extracurricular events, from industry speakers to competitions - including our 'Three Thing Game', where teams have just 24 hours to build a a computer game.

Watch video

Entry requirements

During Clearing we look at all of your qualifications and experience, not just your academic grades – you're more than just letters on a page!

Some courses do still have requirements such as previous study in your subject area, or specific GCSE grades. Others have additional requirements such as an interview or a satisfactory DBS check.

Please call us now on 01482 462238 to find out if we have a course that’s suitable for you.

International students

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £16,000 per year*

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

The applications of computers and computing continue to grow in industry, in commerce and in pure and applied research. Our graduates have moved into all these areas for their first employment – joining computer manufacturers, software houses and IT departments – while others have undertaken postgraduate study and research. Hull graduates have recently gained employment with, among others, Sony, the BBC, Government Communications Headquarters, Logica, Dell Computers, Fujitsu and News International.

95% of our computer studies students are in work or further study six months after graduating (UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey for the academic year 2016/17, published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency 2018).

In designing our degree programmes, we aim to provide you with a good theoretical and practical training which will interest potential employers and equip you with the tools to undertake further study.

There are opportunities for graduates to undertake research, leading to an MSc or PhD, or both. Current research interests in the department include dependable systems, intelligent systems, and simulation and visualisation.