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Faculty of Science and Engineering

Computer Science (Software Engineering)

UndergraduateBSc (Hons) Available in Clearing

Year of entry:
UCAS code: G600

What you'll study

There's huge demand for software engineers. Get a cracking start in the industry while becoming a Chartered IT Professional and working in high-end computing facilities.

Besides the three-year option, there are more specialised versions of this course.

  • You can add a year’s work placement
  • You could study abroad for a year
  • Extend your study to Masters level with an extra year
  • A foundation year boosts your skills and knowledge if you don't quite meet our academic entry requirements

First year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

A common first year across all of our courses covers the fundamental aspects of the subject. Assessment is a mix of exams and coursework, generally 50:50 in the first year and leaning towards coursework in later years. Example first-year coursework includes building a small game or business application in C#, undertaking a performance analysis of different software algorithms and giving a presentation on different aspects of computer hardware.

Your programming skills will be developed using C# and the paradigm of Object Oriented Programming – there are pathways for those with no or little programing experience, and for those who are already accomplished programmers.

Due to the common first year, you can easily switch your degree course at any point until the start of Year 2, when more specialist material begins to be introduced.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Computer Systems

    Gain an overview of what makes the computer perform tasks the programmers ask it to perform. You'll look at basic hardware of the computer, the architecture of a computer system and operating systems, as well as the functionalities required to handle and manage memory and processor times in the presence of multiple users and services.

  • Quantitative Methods for Computing

    Learn and understand some of the key mathematical concepts that underpin and provide the theoretical basis of modern computing.

  • ​Software Engineering and Human Computer Interaction​

    This module takes you beyond programming to software engineering, the discipline concerned with all aspects of complex software production. You'll explore methods for improving planning and software quality, effective elicitation and modelling of software requirements using constrained languages, use cases and state automata, and focus on design for effective human-computer interaction.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Introduction to Programming and Algorithmic Thinking

    This module provides a foundation for students new to programming, or want to further develop existing programming skills. Develop a practical skill that requires both logic and creativity, from understanding basic syntax to constructing bigger and more complex systems, and comparing and evaluating different programming approaches.

  • Programming Paradigms

    You will build on your existing programming experience and start to explore the use of professional development tools and techniques. The primary programming language for this module is C#.

  • Object Oriented Programming and Principles

    This module is designed to build upon the basic knowledge of programming, to reinforce fundamental concepts and develop awareness of the issues involved in the implementation of larger-scale software.

  • Software Project-Based Learning

    Following on from Programming Paradigms, you will apply your programming and development skills as part of a team to produce a solution to a real-world problem scenario.

Second year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

In the second year of your degree, you will begin to specialise more in the area of software development.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Systems Analysis, Design and Process

    This module aims to introduce the tasks of elicitation, modelling and validation of the requirements of an information system. It includes a combination of lectures, practical classes and substantial group-based activity.

  • Information Systems and Web Technologies

    Explore the concepts, principles and guidelines which underpin the design and implementation of information systems, including network based information systems and enterprise systems. Information system design is introduced from an organisational context and the enabling technologies will also be considered.

  • Software Engineering

    The module offers both theoretical and practical study of software engineering with an object oriented perspective. You'll cover analysis, design, implementation and testing and the use of frameworks, components and patterns.

  • Networking and User Interface Design

    This module introduces you to computer networks and the practical problems associated with such interconnections. It also addresses technologies and the role that these play in creating the user interface for enterprise business web applications.

  • Advanced Programming (C++)

    Gain an in-depth knowledge of object-oriented programming. You’ll use C++ as a vehicle to explore how language features and your high-level design decisions are executed on the CPU.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Database Techniques

    A database management system (DBMS) is a program product for keeping computerized records about an enterprise. This module introduces the full implementation of a database system from its original data analysis to a relational table's implementation.

  • Agile Software Development

Final year

All modules are subject to availability and this list may change at any time.

The course consists of 120 credits per year. Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year. Some longer modules, such as a dissertation, are worth more (e.g. 40 credits). In these cases, you’ll study fewer modules - but the number of credits will always add up to 120.

This is the most specialist year of your degree and provides you with the opportunity to work on a major individual software project as part of your dissertation. Year 3 allows you to dig deeper into the subject, acquiring the expertise and experience that will stand you in good stead when entering industry or pursuing further study.

The highlight of the third year is the individual software project. You can choose from a range of suggested topics or propose your own idea, and you will then spend time across both semesters researching, developing, and writing about your chosen software project. Previous projects have included AI simulations, 3D games, emulators for historic computers, stock control management systems, robotics and even a Jedi lightsaber training simulator using 3D motion tracking and virtual reality.

Core modules

Core and compulsory modules are fundamental to achieving the learning outcomes for your course and must be studied.

  • Honours Stage Project

    Show your all-round ability to tackle a substantial piece of computer-related investigation or software design in an area of your interest. You will demonstrate project, time and risk management skills and bring the task to a successful conclusion with a quality report, documentation as appropriate and presentation.

  • Languages and their Compilers

    You'lll study all aspects of computer languages, their background theory, formal specifications of languages and features of languages. You'll gain an understanding of all language both from the history of computers in the past and all current and future languages.

  • Advanced Software Engineering

    Discover the techniques for design of dependable software, drawing on recent advances and current research. You'll explore mechanisms of failure in computer systems and software, and practice techniques for preventing and managing software related hazards via safety analysis, formal specification, advanced software testing and online detection, diagnosis and control of failures.

Optional modules

Optional modules let you tailor the course to your interests. Please note, the availability of optional modules can vary each trimester.

  • Communicating and Teaching Computing

    Undertake a placement in a school or college to develop understanding of the education process and practical teaching and communication skills. Supporting tutorials explore models of learning, curriculum structures, lesson planning, classroom management and professional awareness.

  • Mobile Devices and Applications

  • Starting and Managing a High-Tech Business

    Explore the management, planning and development issues concerning information systems used in an organisation. A key issue is strategic planning to achieve competitive advantage through deployment of information systems, technology, software products and intellectual property. You'll also consider entrepreneurship issues associated with new high-tech business ventures..

  • Distributed Systems Programming

    Beginning with an overview of key networking technologies, relevant software patterns and distributed topologies, this module explores mechanisms for applying your existing C# knowledge to distributed systems or applications whilst considering key areas like scalability and security.

  • Computer Systems Infrastructure and Management

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“Hull University is one of the best universities in the country and I thought that is where I want to be”.

Edward Brown Watch video

"Something that gives me great satisfaction as a lecturer, is when students have that light-bulb moment."

Dr David Parker Watch video

More about this course

Take on board the fundamentals of computer science, then specialise in the areas that interest you – ending with a major individual software project. Some students' previous project topics have included 3D games, stock control management systems and a Jedi lightsaber training simulator.

  • 95% of our students are in work or further study six months after graduating (UK domicile full-time first degree leavers; Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey for the academic year 2016/17, published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency 2018)
  • Accredited by the British Computer Society (the Chartered Institute for IT) to meet the requirements for full Chartered IT Professional and partial Chartered Engineer status. The MEng programme meets all the requirements for both.
  • Our strong links to companies like Microsoft, Sony and Studio Gobo ensure that our teaching stays up to date and industry relevant.
  • Access to facilities including the Hull Immersive Visualization Environment (HIVE).
  • CV-boosting activities such as our Rather Useful Seminar series, our 'Three Thing Game' rapid development competition and opportunities to engage with employers.
  • We've enjoyed multiple wins at the UK finals of the prestigious Microsoft Imagine Cup (which showcases student achievement), as well as trips to the world finals in India and South Korea.

Computer science plays a vital role in driving the technological advances that are essential to 21st-century living. The skills, experience and technical expertise you’ll gain at Hull will put you in high demand when it’s time to enter the job market in this fast-evolving industry.

Teaching and learning

Throughout your degree, you’re expected to study for 1,200 hours per year. That’s based on 200 hours per 20 credit module. And it includes scheduled hours, time spent on placement and independent study. How this time’s divided among each of these varies each year and depends on the course and modules you study.

Scheduled hours typically include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, and supervised laboratory and studio sessions. The types of scheduled lessons you’ll have depend on the course you study.

Placement hours typically include time spent on a work placement, studying abroad, or field trips.

Independent study is the time outside your scheduled timetable, where you’ll be expected to study independently. This typically involves coursework, assignments, reading, preparing presentations and exam revision.

Assessment
Written
Practical
Coursework

First year

53%

7%

40%

Second year

42%

13%

45%

Final year

42%

58%


Written assessment typically includes exams and multiple choice tests.

Practical is an assessment of your skills and competencies. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work.

Coursework typically includes essays, written assignments, dissertations, research projects or producing a portfolio of your work.

Our teaching staff

Where you'll study

The location below may not be the exact location of all modules on your timetable. The buildings you'll be taught in can vary each year and depend on the modules you study.

Hull Campus

Click to view directions on Google Maps

How far will a Computer Science degree take you?

Find out

Links to companies like Microsoft, Sony and Electronic Arts ensure our courses stay industry standard, up to date and relevant.

Take part in a variety of extracurricular events, from industry speakers to competitions - including our 'Three Thing Game', where teams have just 24 hours to build a computer game.

Watch video

Entry requirements

During Clearing we look at all of your qualifications and experience, not just your academic grades – you're more than just letters on a page!

Some courses do still have requirements such as previous study in your subject area, or specific GCSE grades. Others have additional requirements such as an interview or a satisfactory DBS check.

Please call us now on 01482 462238 to find out if we have a course that’s suitable for you.

International students

If you require a Tier 4 student visa to study or if your first language is not English you will be required to provide acceptable evidence of your English language proficiency level.

This course requires academic IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in each skill. For other English language proficiency qualifications acceptable by this University, please click here.

If your English currently does not reach the University's required standard for this programme, you may be interested in one of our English language courses.

Visit your country page to find out more about our entry requirements.

Fees and funding

  • Home/EU: £9,250 per year*
  • International: £16,000 per year*

*The amount you pay may increase each year, in line with inflation - but capped to the Retail Price Index (RPI).

UK and EU students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course, and UK students can take out a maintenance loan of up to £8,700 to cover living costs.

Substantial discounts are available for International students.  

More information on fees can be found in the Money section of the website.

Additional costs

Your tuition fees will cover most costs associated with your programme (including registration, tuition, supervision, assessment and examination).

There are some extra costs that you might have to pay, or choose to pay, depending on your programme of study and the decisions you make. The list below has some examples, and any extra costs will vary.

  • Books (you’ll have access to books from your module reading lists in the library, but you may want to buy your own copies
  • Optional field trips
  • Study abroad (including travel costs, accommodation, visas, immunisation)
  • Placement costs (including travel costs and accommodation)
  • Student visas (international students)
  • Laptop (you’ll have access to laptops and PC’s on campus, but you may want to buy your own)
  • Printing and photocopying
  • Professional-body membership
  • Graduation (gown hire and photography)

Remember, you’ll still need to take into account your living costs. This could include accommodation, travel and food – to name just a few. 

Future prospects

The applications of computers and computing continue to grow in industry, in commerce and in pure and applied research. Our graduates have moved into all of these areas for their first employment – joining computer manufacturers, software houses and IT departments – while others have undertaken postgraduate study and research. Hull graduates have recently gained employment with, among others, Sony, the BBC, Government Communications Headquarters, Logica, Dell Computers, Fujitsu, and News International.

In designing our degree programmes, we aim to provide you with a good theoretical and practical training which will interest potential employers and equip you with the tools to undertake further study.

The University has an excellent Careers Service, which gives individual advice to students about possible careers. It also arranges recruiting visits by prospective employers during your final year. The University does consistently well in the ‘graduate employment’ category of national surveys, and it has one of the lowest graduate unemployment rates in the UK.

Research is an important part of the department’s academic work, and there are opportunities for graduates to undertake research leading to an MSc or PhD, or both. Current research interests in the department include Dependable Systems, Intelligent Systems, and Simulation and Visualization.