ND_Environmental_Management

Novel methods of synthesising circulation metabolites of natural products

About this project

Plant-derived polyphenols are an interesting class of natural product that have been identified to have some pharmacological activities in a range of disease states including cardiovascular diseases (Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, 60, 4, 787-797).  These compounds undergo significant metabolic processing in humans, however these metabolites are not available for use in in vitro drug screening approaches, due to substantial challenges using traditional synthesis methods.  This project will utilise existing expertise in microfluidic synthesis technology at the University of Hull, to develop and characterise such devices for the synthesis of polyphenolic metabolites. 

Studentships will start on 17th September 2018

Supervisors

This project is co-supervised by Dr Huw Jones, Prof. Nicole Pamme, and Dr Kevin Welham in the School of Mathematics and Physical Sciences (Chemistry).

For further information, please contact Dr Huw Jones

Next steps

Funding

To celebrate the University's research successes, the University of Hull is offering a full-time UK/EU PhD Scholarship or International Fees Bursary. 

Entry requirements

Applicants should have an undergraduate degree (1st class) or Masters degree in chemistry or biochemistry.  Applicants should have knowledge or practical experience of microfluidic technology and its application to synthesis, and practical experience of analytical chemistry techniques (e.g. HPLC/LC-MS, NMR, etc.).  Enquiries should be directed to Dr Huw Jones.

How to apply

Apply now

Application deadline: Monday 18th June 2018

Research options:

PhD: 3 years (full-time)

Fees

Full-time UK/EU PhD Scholarships will include fees at the ‘home/EU' student rate and maintenance (£14,777 in 2018/19) for three years, depending on satisfactory progress.

Full-time International Fee PhD Studentships will include full fees at the International student rate for three years, dependent on satisfactory progress.