Dr Rebecca Weil

Dr Rebecca Weil

Lecturer

Faculty and Department

  • Faculty of Health Sciences
  • Department of Psychology

Summary

Rebecca Weil is a social psychologist whose main research interest is in social cognition.

She has been a psychology lecturer at the University of Hull since October 2016.

Previously, Rebecca completed her PhD at the University of Trier, Germany, and spent her time as a post doc at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Recent outputs

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Journal Article

Correction of evident falsehood requires explicit negation

Weil, R., Schul, Y., & Mayo, R. (in press). Correction of evident falsehood requires explicit negation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, https://doi.org/10.1037/xge0000635

When Does Contextual Positivity Influence Judgments of Familiarity" Investigating Moderators of the Positivity-Familiarity Effect

Weil, R., Palma, T., & Gawronski, B. (in press). When Does Contextual Positivity Influence Judgments of Familiarity? Investigating Moderators of the Positivity-Familiarity Effect. Social cognition : the official journal of the International Social Cognition Network,

Detecting falsehood relies on mismatch detection between sentence components

Weil, R., & Mudrik, L. (2020). Detecting falsehood relies on mismatch detection between sentence components. Cognition, 195, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2019.104121

At the boundaries of misattribution: does positivity influence judgments of familiarity in the affect misattribution procedure"

Weil, R., Palma, T. A. C., & Gawronski, B. (2017). At the boundaries of misattribution: does positivity influence judgments of familiarity in the affect misattribution procedure?. Experimental Psychology, 64(6), 369-386. https://doi.org/10.1027/1618-3169/a000379

The role of recollection in evaluative conditioning

Halbeisen, G., Blask, K., Weil, R., & Walther, E. (2014). The role of recollection in evaluative conditioning. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 55, 162-168. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2014.07.005

Research interests

Misinformation, Falsehood, Misattribution

Postgraduate supervision

How Do People Handle Falsehood?

A daily challenge for the mental system is to distinguish between true and false information. The rise of “fake news” seems to make it more and more difficult to distinguish between truth and falsehood. Mounting evidence demonstrates that false information alters existing knowledge even when people are warned about falsehood or surprisingly, even when they know the truth. Thus, it is crucial to investigate how the mental system deals with false information to explain and prevent errors in validation.