Dr Jorg Hardege

Dr Jorg Hardege

Reader in Chemical Ecology

Faculty and Department

  • Faculty of Science and Engineering
  • Department of Biological and Marine Sciences

Qualifications

  • PhD

Summary

For almost 30 years, Dr Hardege has studied how animals use chemical signals.

Our understanding of senses has greatly improved, but our knowledge of the importance of smell and odour in animal, microbial and plant communication systems is still relatively weak.

This is challenging in the face of climate change with the reduction in the oceans' pH affecting marine organisms' ability to use chemical signals.

We currently have no realistic idea as to whether animal signalling systems can adapt or have the plasticity to overcome what is known as 'olfactory disruption'. Most of Dr Hardege's current research focuses on this topic as well as the impacts of combined stressors including microplastic pollution and endocrine disruption.

Recent outputs

View more outputs

Journal Article

Becoming nose-blind—Climate change impacts on chemical communication

Roggatz, C. C., Saha, M., Blanchard, S., Schirrmacher, P., Fink, P., Verheggen, F., & Hardege, J. D. (2022). Becoming nose-blind—Climate change impacts on chemical communication. Global change biology, https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.16209

Modelling Antifouling compounds of Macroalgal Holobionts in Current and Future pH Conditions

Hardege, J. D., Roggatz, C. C., & Saha, M. (2022). Modelling Antifouling compounds of Macroalgal Holobionts in Current and Future pH Conditions. Journal of Chemical Ecology, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10886-021-01340-4

Behavioural stress propagation in benthic invertebrates caused by acute pH drop-induced metabolites

Feugere, L., Angell, L., Fagents, J., Nightingale, R., Rowland, K., Skinner, S., …Wollenberg Valero, K. C. (2021). Behavioural stress propagation in benthic invertebrates caused by acute pH drop-induced metabolites. Frontiers in Marine Science, 8, Article 773870. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2021.773870

The Nereid on the rise: Platynereis as a model system

Özpolat, B. D., Randel, N., Williams, E. A., Bezares-Calderón, L. A., Andreatta, G., Balavoine, G., …Arendt, D. (2021). The Nereid on the rise: Platynereis as a model system. EvoDevo, 12(1), Article 10. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13227-021-00180-3

Acidification can directly affect olfaction in marine organisms

Porteus, C. S., Roggatz, C. C., Velez, Z., Hardege, J. D., & Hubbard, P. C. (2021). Acidification can directly affect olfaction in marine organisms. The journal of experimental biology, 224(14), https://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.237941

Research interests

- Sensory physiology and chemical signals

- Climate change and stability of functional traits

- Impacts of combined stressors on animal health

- Effects of microplastics

- The use of pheromones in invasive species and pest control

- development of ecologically sound aquaculture

- development of plastic replacement products

- development of electrodes to split water for hydrogen production

Project

Funder

Grant

Started

Status

Project

Effects of Environmental Context on Species Trait Expression in Moderating Projections of Marine Ecosystems Futures

Funder

NERC Natural Environment Research Council

Grant

£171,344.00

Started

1 January 2020

Status

Ongoing

Project

Sex Pheromones as Novel Tools for Monitoring and Control

Funder

OSU Oregon State University

Grant

£4,083.00

Started

1 August 2017

Status

Complete

Postgraduate supervision

Dr Hardege welcomes MSc and PhD projects that deal with animal ecology and physiology, especially when research on animal olfaction is involved.

His research group also has a major interest in applied projects in areas such as aquaculture and pest control, developing sensor for animals, plant fitness and research related to the impacts of climate change (i.e. ocean acidification). These are encouraged, as are projects linking these to past extinctions or predicting future extinctions.

The group's work spans areas from behaviour to physiology, including molecular aspects as well as chemistry.

Completed PhDs

Over the past 20 years, Dr Hardege's research group has hosted 14 PDRAs and more than 50 postgraduate students, most of whom are now in academic positions worldwide - including in China, the USA, Portugal, Uruguay, Germany, Ghana, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and the UK. Current PDRA/Fellows: Dr. Nichola Fletcher (NERC), Dr. Victoria Scott (EU fellow);

Over 20 PhD research projects have been completed under his supervision, with all but one of these externally funded. Current PhD supervisions:

First supervisor:

Paula Schirrmacher, Jessica Hurley, Rebecca Goodwin, Ashely McCowen, Hannah Ohnstad,

Second supervisor:

Amber Jones, Jonathan Burnett, Bryce Richardson, Victoria Scott, Afshan Dabeer, Nazish Fatima,