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Florence Halstead

Miss Florence Halstead

Post Doctoral Research Associate

Faculty and Department

  • Faculty of Arts Cultures and Education
  • School of Education

Qualifications

  • BA (University of Hull)
  • PhD (University of Hull)

Summary

As a PDRA at the University of Hull, Florence has experience spanning numerous international research projects working directly with children, youth, families, communities and schools. Florence works across disciplines on a broad spectrum of topics; most prominently Youth Activism, Education, Social Justice, Sustainability and Climate Change. With the consistent goal of enhancing the voices of marginalised people, she has expertise in qualitative and participatory data collection methods and analysis, and has employed ethnographic, as well as arts-based and creative, approaches to her research. She has conducted research both here in the UK, and internationally - working with partners in Vietnam, Cambodia, Kenya and beyond.

Florence has taught and mentored undergraduate students in Teacher Education; specifically the Modules 'Professional Practice' and 'Inquiry Based Learning'.

Florence has given lectures and seminars on the module 'Flood Adaptation and Mitigation'.

Florence often appears as a guest lecturer across modules within the Faculty of Arts, Culture and Education; and within the Energy and Environment Institute.

Recent outputs

View more outputs

Journal Article

2020-Vision: understanding climate (in)action through the emotional lens of loss

Jones, L., Halstead, F., Parsons, K., Le, H., Ha Bui, L. T., Hackney, C., & Parsons, D. (in press). 2020-Vision: understanding climate (in)action through the emotional lens of loss. Journal of the British Academy, 9(s5), 29-68. https://doi.org/10.5871/jba/009s5.029

A journey of emotions from a young environmental activist

Halstead, F., Parsons, L. R., Dunhill, A., & Parsons, K. (2021). A journey of emotions from a young environmental activist. Area, https://doi.org/10.1111/area.12745

Other

How students can use storytelling to bring the dangers of climate change to life

Parsons, K., Halstead, F., & Jones, L. (2021). How students can use storytelling to bring the dangers of climate change to life

Presentation / Conference

INtergenerational Stories of Erosion and Coastal community Understanding of REsilience 'INSECURE'

Parsons, K., Jones, L., & Halstead, F. (2021, April). INtergenerational Stories of Erosion and Coastal community Understanding of REsilience ‘INSECURE’. Presented at EGU General Assembly 2021 (European Geosciences Union), vEGU21: Gather Online

I'll be dead by the time it happens: Children's Perceptions of Climate Change in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

Halstead, F., Parsons, D., Jones, L., & Hackney, C. (2020, May). I'll be dead by the time it happens: Children's Perceptions of Climate Change in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Paper presented at EGU General Assembly 2020 (European Geosciences Union), Sharing Geoscience Online

Research interests

Florence's research interests focus predominantly at the interface between climate change, sustainability and education. She has a particular interest in international settings, and has a growing repertoire working in youth climate action.

Social and Climate Justice, Education for Sustainable Development; Youth Climate Activism, Climate Resilience; Socio-cultural Determinants; Gender; Children’s Rights; Participatory and Creative Methodologies, Anthropology.

Project

Funder

Grant

Started

Status

Project

Gender (in)equality in the face of Climate Change and hydrometerological hazards in Vietnam

Funder

British Geological Survey

Grant

£7,000.00

Started

16 August 2021

Status

Complete

Charity role

Youth Group Volunteer

2021

School Governor

2020

Knowledge Exchange Facilitator

2017

Committee/Steering group role

Postgraduate Officer

2018 - 2019

Conference presentation

vEGU20: I’ll be dead by the time it happens: Children’s Perceptions of Climate Change in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

2020

The Mekong Delta in Southern Vietnam is one of the most at risk places globally to the effects of climate change and sea level rise, specifically in terms of flooding. It is predicted to change drastically over the next 100 years, with additional human-driven actions (such as sand mining and groundwater extraction) expected to exasperate the speed and severity of said change. Understanding the existing perceptions of those that will face these future challenges, and what contributes to forming those perceptions, is a critical underpinning required for the success of any future resilience and mitigation initiatives. A holistic view that takes account of these varying influences on societal perceptions, resilience and education needs to be taken. One of the most vulnerable groups to the consequences of climate change, and indeed the citizens that will go on to tackle the majority of challenges we are predicted to face in the future, is children. For this reason alone, ascertaining their perceptions and understandings, along with the influences and sources that shape their views, is paramount. This paper will present the findings from a project that explored local children’s perceptions of climate change in the heart of the Mekong Delta. Creative and arts-based methods enabled children’s voices to be heard. Combined with further policy analysis and interviews with parents, teachers and government officials, these voices have been further contextualised within their socio-cultural context and environment. Through developing an understanding of these perceptions and the influencing factors, a more effective and holistic approach to shaping children’s climate change resilience can be executed, which will ultimately enhance a society’s ability to adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change into the future.

AGU19: Climate Change and Children: Positioning Children as Stakeholders within the Climate Change Debate in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

2019

Home to almost 20 million people, the Mekong Delta in Vietnam is one of the most at risk regions globally in terms of exposure to climate change and sea-level rise, notably in terms of future flood risk. Societal resilience to climate change and flood risk will underpin adaptation and mitigation measures into the future. An essential first step in developing resilience within at risk communities is an appreciation of existing understandings and perceptions of the target audience. It is also important to decipher where these understandings and perceptions stem from, identifying influencing factors. To understand this, a multidisciplinary approach that listens to the personal needs and perceptions of local stakeholders is required. Amongst these local stakeholders, yet often an underexplored and forgotten group within both research and policy, is children. This is despite children being statistically the most vulnerable group to both the effects of climate change and flooding. As the citizens and stakeholders that will go on to face the projected changes associated with climate change, understanding their existing perceptions is paramount. This paper will present the findings from a project that explored local children's perceptions of climate change in the heart of the Mekong Delta. Creative and arts based methods enabled children's voices to be heard. Combined with further policy analysis and interviews with parents, teachers and government officials, these voices have been further contextualised within their socio-cultural context and environment. Through developing an understanding of these perceptions and the influencing factors, a more effective and holistic approach to shaping children's climate change resilience can be executed, which will ultimately enhance a society's ability to adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change into the future.

AGU19: Children and Climate Change: Using an Ecological Systems Theory to Explore Children’s Perceptions of Climate Change in Vietnam.

2019

The Mekong Delta in Southern Vietnam is one of the most at risk places globally to the effects of climate change and sea level rise, specifically in terms of flooding. It is predicted to change drastically over the next 100 years. Understanding the existing perceptions of those that will face these future challenges, and what contributes to forming those perceptions, is a critical underpinning required for the success of any future resilience and mitigation initiatives. In the face of present and future changes, these influencing factors, and the degree to which they influence, need to be understood if academics, policy makers and stakeholders are to help foster and enhance community resilience. A holistic view that takes account of the varying influences on societal perceptions, resilience and education needs to be taken. One of the most vulnerable groups to the consequences of climate change, and indeed the citizens that will go on to tackle the majority of challenges we are predicted to face in the future, is children. For this reason alone, ascertaining their perceptions and understandings, along with the influences and sources that shape their views, is paramount. This paper will present how Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory was utilised to aid the understanding of children's perceptions of climate change in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. By applying Bronfenbrenner's model, the entangled and enmeshed network that is children's lives was systematically analysed, uncovering what their perceptions are as well as the influencing factors that contributed to and shaped their perceptions. These findings can support future initiatives that aim to strengthen resilience within at risk communities, taking account of existing perceptions and their origins.

EGU19: Climate Change and Children in Vietnam: Influencers, Understandings, and Perceptions.

2019

An essential first step in developing educational outcomes is an appreciation of existing understandings and perceptions of the target audience. It is also important to decipher where these understandings and perceptions stem from, identifying the influencing factors. Whilst all understandings and perceptions are unique to the individual, it is common for societies to share collective cultural beliefs and perceptions, particularly when assessing perceived hazard and risk. This paper presents preliminary findings from a cohort of school children on the Mekong Delta in Vietnam, one of the most at risk regions globally in terms of exposure to climate change and sea-level rise. The results show that their understandings and perceptions in relation to climate change and flooding are shaped by four main influences: the media, family, lived experiences and formal education. The most obvious of these four to target when strategically implementing climate change education is formal education within schools. However, to be executed correctly, it must consciously take account of the other 3 factors that have influence on children and their views. This may highlight that a more localised approach to climate change education in schools will be more effective, drawing on local and regional changes as driven by climate change. Climate change will effect each society throughout the world in different ways, and whilst the global impacts of climate change need to be educated to all, societal resilience and overall capacity to adapt and mitigate climate change will need to have a strong local and regional understanding base. Through developing an understanding on the influences of children’s perceptions, shaped by local knowledge and experience, a more effective and holistic approach to children’s climate change education can be implemented, which will ultimately enhance societal resilience into the future.

RGS-IBG-19: “When Crafting Goes Bad”: Exploring Barriers to Participation-Based Research Using Arts and Crafts.

2019

The deployment of crafts as a methodological approach and participatory tool in research can be rich and rewarding, both for researchers and research participants. However, there are contexts in which the use of crafts can become problematic. Whilst human expression through art and craft is universal, the execution is always culturally mediated. Based on our research experiences in the UK and overseas, we describe some barriers to the successful use of crafts as a participatory research strategy. These barriers can include cultural and educational norms, aesthetic attachment to 'good' craft, gender bias and expectations, and lack of confidence in the researcher's chosen medium. We will put attendees in the position of the research participant, giving them an experiential opportunity to play with their own barriers to making. By illustrating what happens when "crafting goes bad", we highlight the importance of context sensitive methodologies, which maximise inclusivity for all involved.

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