Torch

Dr Rachel Anderson

Senior Lecturer

Faculty and Department

  • Faculty of Health Sciences
  • School of Life Sciences

Qualifications

  • BSc (Goldsmiths, University of London)
  • PhD (Goldsmiths, University of London)

Summary

Programme Director, Psychology postgraduate research degrees (PhD, MSc by Research, MRes)

ESRC White Rose DTP Deputy Director - Wellbeing, Health & Communities Pathway

Dr Rachel Anderson joined the University in 2010 after lecturing / post-doctoral positions at Leeds Beckett University and the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience.

She was awarded her PhD from Goldsmiths, University of London, in 2007.

Journal Article

Survival processing versus self-reference : a memory advantage following descriptive self-referential encoding

Dewhurst, S. A., Anderson, R. J., Grace, L., & Boland, J. (2017). Survival processing versus self-reference : a memory advantage following descriptive self-referential encoding. Journal of Memory and Language, 94, 291-304. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.003

Individual differences in susceptibility to false memories: The effect of memory specificity

Dewhurst, S. A., Anderson, R. J., Berry, D. M., & Garner, S. R. (2018). Individual differences in susceptibility to false memories: The effect of memory specificity. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 71(7), 1637-1644. https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2017.1345961

False memories, but not false beliefs, affect implicit attitudes for food preferences

Howe, D., Anderson, R. J., & Dewhurst, S. A. (2017). False memories, but not false beliefs, affect implicit attitudes for food preferences. Acta psychologica, 179, 14-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actpsy.2017.07.002

A brighter future : the effect of positive episodic simulation on future predictions in non-depressed, moderately dysphoric & highly dysphoric individuals

Boland, J., Riggs, K. J., & Anderson, R. J. (2018). A brighter future : the effect of positive episodic simulation on future predictions in non-depressed, moderately dysphoric & highly dysphoric individuals. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 100, 7-16. doi:10.1016/j.brat.2017.10.010

Simulation, false memories, and the planning of future events.

Dewhurst, S. A., Anderson, R. J., Grace, L., & Howe, D. (2019). Simulation, false memories, and the planning of future events. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 45(1), 26-36. https://doi.org/10.1037/xlm0000575

Research interests

Autobiographical Memory

Prospective Cognition

Memory & Prospective Thinking Biases in Depression

Project

Funder

Grant

Started

Status

Project

White Rose Social Sciences Doctoral Training Partnership

Funder

ESRC Economic & Social Research Council

Grant

£79,066.00

Started

1 October 2017

Status

Ongoing

Postgraduate supervision

Dr Anderson welcomes applications in the areas of autobiographical memory and / or prospective cognition. In particular, she is interested in

- the cognitive processes underlying memory / future thinking, their similarities and differences

- the functional purpose of memory / future thinking, such as their relationship with a sense of self, psychological well-being / distress, and in guiding future goal-oriented behaviour and problem-solving behaviours

- the relationship between memory / future thinking impairments and psychological distress

- the role of memory / future thinking impairments in chronic health conditions, such as Parkinson's disease

- the potential use of memory / future thinking as a tool for promoting psychological / physical well-being and / or alleviating distress

Completed PhD Supervisions

- Jennifer Boland (2018 ) - The effect of positive episodic simulation on future event predictions in non-depressed, Ddysphoric, and depressed individuals.

- Lydia Grace (2018) - Autobiographical memory and the self in dysphoria.

David Howe ( 2018) Implicit and explicit attitudinal consequences of false autobiographical memories and beliefs (2nd Supervisor).