Qing Lu

Faculty and Department

  • Faculty of Business, Law and Politics
  • Hull University Business School

Summary

Dr Qing Lu started her lectureship at the Hull University Business School in April 2009. Prior to joining Hull, Dr Lu had been a lecturer at Sunderland Business School for nearly four years. In 2005, she finished her PhD study and was awarded a PhD in Economics from University of Dundee. Her PhD study was financially supported by the Overseas Research Students Awards.

Journal Article

Bounded Reliability and the termination of international joint ventures – insights from the Mid-Med Bank, 1975–1979

Lu, Q. (2019). Bounded Reliability and the termination of international joint ventures – insights from the Mid-Med Bank, 1975–1979. Business history, 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2018.1552679

Is the speed of post-acquisition integration manageable" Case study: post-acquisition integration of HSBC with the Mercantile Bank, 1959–84

Lu, Q. (2014). Is the speed of post-acquisition integration manageable? Case study: post-acquisition integration of HSBC with the Mercantile Bank, 1959–84. Business history, 56(8), 1262-1280. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2013.876533

Factors influencing the growth of foreign banks' branches in China

Lu, Q., & Dewhurst, J. (2007). Factors influencing the growth of foreign banks' branches in China. Journal of Contemporary China, 16(52), 517-534. https://doi.org/10.1080/10670560701314487

The US government dual banking regulation levels, transaction costs and HSBC's strategy in acquiring Marine Midland Banks, Inc., 1978-80

Lu, Q. (2010). The US government dual banking regulation levels, transaction costs and HSBC's strategy in acquiring Marine Midland Banks, Inc., 1978-80. Business history, 52(6), 955-977. doi:10.1080/00076791.2010.511184

Government control, transaction costs, and commitment between the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation (HSBC) and the Chinese government

Lu, Q. (2008). Government control, transaction costs, and commitment between the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation (HSBC) and the Chinese government. Enterprise & society, 9(1), 44-69. doi:10.1093/es/khm106